food obsession

I find myself thinking about food obsessively. I'm diagnosed OCD. I have an unpleasant life, and no in person support. I hate my body and I'm looking to lose 50-70 pounds. I started out strong by doing the same thing every day. I went to work at the same time, and ate the same foods. I lost 60 pounds. Then I moved and fell off the wagon and it's been chaos every since. I work varying hours, I'm in a new living situation, and i started going to school. Things change around every day. I don't have the same structure. Every day I start strong, but I obsess about eating certain foods--even though they never really taste good to me. Once I start obsessing I fail. Does anyone else have this problem and have a solution?

Replies

  • harrybananas
    harrybananas Posts: 292 Member
    Easy. Eat what you crave, but make sure you're eating within your daily calorie limit and you'll be golden. Nothing but unicorns and rainbows ahead for you op.
  • Kyrenora
    Kyrenora Posts: 133 Member
    I have OCD as well, so I know how bad those obsessions can get. First of all, what are you doing to manage the condition? That's really where you need to start if your obsessions are currently centering around foods.
  • bri170lb
    bri170lb Posts: 1,375 Member
    I agree with the above poster. It sounds like the OCD is keeping you from reaching your weight loss goals. When this kind if problem is interfering with your life -- it's time to seek help with it.
  • L0singMoreThanMyMind
    L0singMoreThanMyMind Posts: 26 Member
    edited January 2016
    Currently i journal every day. I keep my hands busy through out the day by playing video games or doing schoolwork. The problem is that my mind roams beyond the task at hand. I try to distract myself but it's challenging. I have to make the decision not to eat something over and over again.
    One technique i learned in therapy a while back was to write down the thought i was obsessed about and tear it up. But it doesn't seem to work wih food because it's more intangible.
  • Kyrenora
    Kyrenora Posts: 133 Member
    Currently i journal every day. I keep my hands busy through out the day by playing video games or doing schoolwork. The problem is that my mind roams beyond the task at hand. I try to distract myself but it's challenging. I have to make the decision not to eat something over and over again.
    One technique i learned in therapy a while back was to write down the thought i was obsessed about and tear it up. But it doesn't seem to work wih food because it's more intangible.

    Are you still in therapy? Have you ever gone the medication route? It made an enormous difference in my case.
  • For years i was in therapy and taking prozac and klonopin. I improved significantly and am no longer on medication or in therapy. I have some mild obsessions now, including the food issue. I just recently regained health insurance. Do you think a therapist could help me with my food obsession? I never addressed my food issues in therapy in the past.
  • Whitezombiegirl
    Whitezombiegirl Posts: 1,044 Member
    Do these foods you crave have positive associations for you? Like a comfort blanket. It seems like a daft suggestion but would just keeping the packets help so you have them without actually having to eat them.

    It actually worked for me.
  • Kyrenora
    Kyrenora Posts: 133 Member
    For years i was in therapy and taking prozac and klonopin. I improved significantly and am no longer on medication or in therapy. I have some mild obsessions now, including the food issue. I just recently regained health insurance. Do you think a therapist could help me with my food obsession? I never addressed my food issues in therapy in the past.

    It can absolutely help. It took me years of therapy and finding the right combination of medications (one specifically geared toward OCD) to get to a point where I could manage my obsessions. The other thing is that, like most psychiatric disorders, OCD has a tendency to increase in intensity during any time of stress or major changes. During these times, an alteration in coping mechanisms is often needed, and a therapist can help with that.
  • Okay thank you everyone! I will look into a therapist. And be a little nicer to myself because it's difficult to adjust