When will they make wrist fitness monitor with BIG NUMBERS on display?

I had cataract surgery last year so need reading glasses to see anything close up (even my cellphone). I cannot read the tiny numbers on all the new HRM wrist fitness monitor displays. When will manufacturers realize they are missing a big segment of the population with their gadgets? I cannot walk outside with reading glasses on because I can't focus on much more than 4 feet away. I need an HRM that displays my heart rate in real time and in BIG NUMBERS that I can read without my reading glasses. All I really want to see is HR in real time. I'm don't care about time walked, steps taken, distance walked or pace. I can look at those at the end of my workout with my reading glasses.
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Replies

  • jaz050465
    jaz050465 Posts: 3,508 Member
    Have you seen thevPolar A360.
  • ScubaSteve1962
    ScubaSteve1962 Posts: 612 Member
    Most of the Polar activity monitors, you can set the screen to show how you would like it to look, with one to three activities.
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    I looked at both Polar A300 and A360. Both fuzzy perhaps because the background colored lighting doesn't contrast well with color of digital numbers. The only one that was easy to read was ft1. It is black on white and only number displayed is HR. But you must wesr chest strap.. not an optical reader.
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    Most of the Polar activity monitors, you can set the screen to show how you would like it to look, with one to three activities.

    I didn't know that. Can I display just HR in large numbers?
  • EvgeniZyntx
    EvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,208 Member
    Most high end HR monitors watches have this option.
  • ScubaSteve1962
    ScubaSteve1962 Posts: 612 Member
    Most of the Polar activity monitors, you can set the screen to show how you would like it to look, with one to three activities.

    I didn't know that. Can I display just HR in large numbers?

    Yes you can set the display to show just heart rate
  • nordlead2005
    nordlead2005 Posts: 1,303 Member
    edited February 2016
    ok, by big segment of the market you mean a handful of people right?

    Based on a report by Gartner in 2014, there was a total world wide "wearable electronic fitness device market" of 70.2 million units.

    Of those, 28 million units were watches or wrist devices (what you are looking for). If we assume that 100% of the watches were HR monitors, and 25% of the wristbands were, that gives us 23 million units. If we then assume that 1% have poor vision that can't be constantly corrected, then that leaves you with a market of 230k units.

    So, which would you rather go after? The 230k unit market or the 23m unit market? If you win just 1.1% of the 23m unit market you do better than trying to win 100% of the 230k unit market which would be near impossible even if you were the only person competing in that market.

    So, it is unlikely a major player will compete in that market, but some of the ones targeting the larger market may have the features you need (as pointed out that smart watches have large number displays). This is like asking when they are going to make smart phones for old people with poor vision and a lack of computer savvy. There is a market for it, but it isn't worth the time for most of the major players. There are a few competitors cropping up, but they typically put out mediocre solutions at best.

    EDIT (yes, I realize I'm leaving out the people who didn't buy one because of poor vision and not being happy with what was available, but that market is likely to be even smaller).
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    I do not have poor vision. I see 20/20 with reading glasses and 20/20 at distance without glasses. I use my smartphone just fine using my reading glasses. I do no want a smart watch to receive phone calls, text messages, etc. Just an accurate fitness watch I can read without reading glasses. I am not an elderly person (age 62). I don't need running, cycling, swimming, or sleep monitoring. Just an accurate walking app that will help me in cardiac rehab. I don't care about how many steps I take each day. Only when it matters (during exercise workouts). How many people do you estimate need devices for cardiac rehab based on number of heart attacks each year?

    Eye surgeon said he is seeing many more patients with cataracts at much younger age than a few years ago, They aren't sure why be some hypothesize it may be due excessive exposure to older computer CRT monitors. I have spent decades 8 hours a day in front of those. You probably only know about modern LCD monitors.

    Checking out fitness apps that interface with Polar H7 chest strap. Maybe I will find one that displays HR in large numbers on my Samsung Galaxy S6.
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    But why must I pay for high end watch when I will never use most of its features?
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    I do not have poor vision. I see 20/20 with reading glasses and 20/20 at distance without glasses. I use my smartphone just fine using my reading glasses. I do no want a smart watch to receive phone calls, text messages, etc. Just an accurate fitness watch I can read without reading glasses. I am not an elderly person (age 62). I don't need running, cycling, swimming, or sleep monitoring. Just an accurate walking app that will help me in cardiac rehab. I don't care about how many steps I take each day. Only when it matters (during exercise workouts). How many people do you estimate need devices for cardiac rehab based on number of heart attacks each year?

    Eye surgeon said he is seeing many more patients with cataracts at much younger age than a few years ago, They aren't sure why but some hypothesize it may be due excessive exposure to older computer CRT monitors. I have spent decades 8 hours a day in front of those doing advanced programming. So I AM very computer savvy.

    Checking out fitness apps that interface with Polar H7 chest strap. Maybe I will find one that displays HR in large numbers on my Samsung Galaxy S6.

  • EvgeniZyntx
    EvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,208 Member
    But why must I pay for high end watch when I will never use most of its features?

    You don't have to - just like most people who use a a wrist tracker prefer having a small device with a screen that uses less energy...

    But hey, go see DCRainmaker's site - you'll surely find a device that fits your needs. There are literally hundreds of different trackers.
  • DYELB
    DYELB Posts: 7,407 Member
    I had cataract surgery last year so need reading glasses to see anything close up (even my cellphone). I cannot read the tiny numbers on all the new HRM wrist fitness monitor displays. When will manufacturers realize they are missing a big segment of the population with their gadgets? I cannot walk outside with reading glasses on because I can't focus on much more than 4 feet away. I need an HRM that displays my heart rate in real time and in BIG NUMBERS that I can read without my reading glasses. All I really want to see is HR in real time. I'm don't care about time walked, steps taken, distance walked or pace. I can look at those at the end of my workout with my reading glasses.

    A big segment of the population?

    Is that bigger or smaller than the Porphyria segment?
  • CassidyScaglione
    CassidyScaglione Posts: 673 Member
    ok, by big segment of the market you mean a handful of people right?

    Based on a report by Gartner in 2014, there was a total world wide "wearable electronic fitness device market" of 70.2 million units.

    Of those, 28 million units were watches or wrist devices (what you are looking for). If we assume that 100% of the watches were HR monitors, and 25% of the wristbands were, that gives us 23 million units. If we then assume that 1% have poor vision that can't be constantly corrected, then that leaves you with a market of 230k units.

    So, which would you rather go after? The 230k unit market or the 23m unit market? If you win just 1.1% of the 23m unit market you do better than trying to win 100% of the 230k unit market which would be near impossible even if you were the only person competing in that market.

    So, it is unlikely a major player will compete in that market, but some of the ones targeting the larger market may have the features you need (as pointed out that smart watches have large number displays). This is like asking when they are going to make smart phones for old people with poor vision and a lack of computer savvy. There is a market for it, but it isn't worth the time for most of the major players. There are a few competitors cropping up, but they typically put out mediocre solutions at best.

    EDIT (yes, I realize I'm leaving out the people who didn't buy one because of poor vision and not being happy with what was available, but that market is likely to be even smaller).

    With a huge aging population ( Baby Boomers), i don't think a line with larger screens would be unreasonable. And you can even market them to the larger population because of the bigger screen, i bet... after all, we are all carting around smart phones that are increasingly likely to be mistaken as flat screen television sets.
  • nordlead2005
    nordlead2005 Posts: 1,303 Member
    I do not have poor vision. I see 20/20 with reading glasses and 20/20 at distance without glasses. I use my smartphone just fine using my reading glasses. I do no want a smart watch to receive phone calls, text messages, etc. Just an accurate fitness watch I can read without reading glasses. I am not an elderly person (age 62). I don't need running, cycling, swimming, or sleep monitoring. Just an accurate walking app that will help me in cardiac rehab. I don't care about how many steps I take each day. Only when it matters (during exercise workouts). How many people do you estimate need devices for cardiac rehab based on number of heart attacks each year?

    Eye surgeon said he is seeing many more patients with cataracts at much younger age than a few years ago, They aren't sure why be some hypothesize it may be due excessive exposure to older computer CRT monitors. I have spent decades 8 hours a day in front of those. You probably only know about modern LCD monitors.

    Checking out fitness apps that interface with Polar H7 chest strap. Maybe I will find one that displays HR in large numbers on my Samsung Galaxy S6.

    I didn't say you were old (62 is old though, median age in the US is ~38) I just gave an example of a market (smartphones for older people) that isn't served properly due to its small size. And, if you aren't willing to wear reading glasses while walking outside, then you have "poor vision that can't be constantly corrected". Yes, reading glasses fix your sight issues, but if you refuse to wear them then you are placing yourself in a tiny market for large displays. Also, as you specialize your needs you shrink your market even further.

    The heart attack market that can see fine without restrictions is already well served by the chest strap and wrist device manufacturers. I don't see how heart attacks somehow increases the need for large numbers.

    And, I know what a CRT is. LCD's didn't become popular until after the year 2000 and didn't surpass CRT's in TV sales until the year 2007. I don't get the point of this statement though, are you trying to prove how old you are here or how young?

    If you want to know why a "big" market is being ignored, the answer is typically because it isn't a big market. If you believe otherwise (they don't see the need, or you think the need is underestimated), then your best bet is to start the business yourself.
  • ScubaSteve1962
    ScubaSteve1962 Posts: 612 Member
    edited February 2016
    But why must I pay for high end watch when I will never use most of its features?

    Here's something that may fit your needs, see page 20 manual on display.

    http://www.amazon.com/Polar-Heart-Monitor-Watch-Black/dp/B001F0PVO4

    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/C1BIDsACQ9S.pdf
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    Found a solution. I am using Polar H7 chest strap with Endomondo app on my Samsung Galaxy S4. The app shows exactly what I need to see and can see well without reading glasses on display.

    Duration, distance walked, current HR, pace. After walk, I get a summary with avg HR, Max HR, kcals burned. Great app. Can set it to pause if you stop walking and resumes when walking again. Also gives audio updates throughout workout.

    Cellphone screen not easy to see in bright sunlight but fine up to 3 hours after sunrise and 2 hours before sundown. Excellent at night.

    Bought cellphone fanny pack you wear in front of body around waist from Amazon with clear window to see and operate cellphone. Waterproof and simple to just tilt up to view screen, swipe screen, or press button on cellphone.

    An IPhone 6 or Samsung Galaxy S6 too big to fit in pocket of fanny pack but my trusty S4 in otterbox fits perfectly.

    Thanks for all suggestions. I tried a lot of apps that didn't meet my needs. Digitrax iCardio doesn't show real time HR, Polar Beat and Flow try to squeeze too much data on screen so HR not easy to see.

    My cardiologist doesn't trust wrist-based HR monitoring so this setup meets his specifications.

    BTW It is not that I don't WANT to wear reading glasses walking outside. I can't see distance with them on so could trip over curb, etc. If I had multifocal or adaptive intraocular lenses implanted, I would not need reading glasses but too pricey for me.

  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
    I do not have poor vision. I see 20/20 with reading glasses and 20/20 at distance without glasses. I use my smartphone just fine using my reading glasses. I do no want a smart watch to receive phone calls, text messages, etc. Just an accurate fitness watch I can read without reading glasses. I am not an elderly person (age 62). I don't need running, cycling, swimming, or sleep monitoring. Just an accurate walking app that will help me in cardiac rehab. I don't care about how many steps I take each day. Only when it matters (during exercise workouts). How many people do you estimate need devices for cardiac rehab based on number of heart attacks each year?

    Eye surgeon said he is seeing many more patients with cataracts at much younger age than a few years ago, They aren't sure why be some hypothesize it may be due excessive exposure to older computer CRT monitors. I have spent decades 8 hours a day in front of those. You probably only know about modern LCD monitors.

    Checking out fitness apps that interface with Polar H7 chest strap. Maybe I will find one that displays HR in large numbers on my Samsung Galaxy S6.

    I didn't say you were old (62 is old though, median age in the US is ~38) I just gave an example of a market (smartphones for older people) that isn't served properly due to its small size. And, if you aren't willing to wear reading glasses while walking outside, then you have "poor vision that can't be constantly corrected". Yes, reading glasses fix your sight issues, but if you refuse to wear them then you are placing yourself in a tiny market for large displays. Also, as you specialize your needs you shrink your market even further.

    The heart attack market that can see fine without restrictions is already well served by the chest strap and wrist device manufacturers. I don't see how heart attacks somehow increases the need for large numbers.

    And, I know what a CRT is. LCD's didn't become popular until after the year 2000 and didn't surpass CRT's in TV sales until the year 2007. I don't get the point of this statement though, are you trying to prove how old you are here or how young?

    If you want to know why a "big" market is being ignored, the answer is typically because it isn't a big market. If you believe otherwise (they don't see the need, or you think the need is underestimated), then your best bet is to start the business yourself.

    This is so ignorant and age-discriminatory I can't believe it!!! Pretty much the majority of the population over age 50 or so needs reading glasses or bifocals. If you wear contacts or don't otherwise need glasses, you do need reading glasses. And most people do not walk around wearing their reading glasses because they affect your depth perception at that distance. Please stick to what you know about and quit insulting the older population.
  • chey282
    chey282 Posts: 96 Member
    Koinflipper, I had a similar surgery, also for cataracts, have perfect distance vision, horrible reading, my eye dr worked with me on finding contacts I can wear all the time and read but still have my distance vision. It's still not perfect, but better than carrying reading glasses everywhere or not being able to see!! Just something to think about!!
  • koinflipper
    koinflipper Posts: 45 Member
    Eyes too dry for contacts. Already tried that. I really hate constantly grabbing for my reading glasses or looking for them. Put a cheap pair in each room and purse. Sometimes still can't find a pair.
  • chey282
    chey282 Posts: 96 Member
    I had same problem til we went with a peroxide base cleaner/soak and went thru several brands of contacts. My eye dr Thot I was having a reaction to the solutions, I also think it's partly my meds help dry my eyes out. Maybe see if there isn't a brand that you could use? I go nuts trying to keep track of the reading glasses now, when I don't wear the contacts! an alternative would be bifocals where the top is no script but you could wear them all the time? I feel your frustration!!