Teach me how to love lifting

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  • mean_and_lean
    mean_and_lean Posts: 164 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.

    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    Or . . . . they just think it's boring.

    Not everyone likes to lift weights. It's not the "end all be all" of exercise. The OP should do something that they enjoy doing and what they will stick to because they want to do it, not because some online community says they have to.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,688 Member
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    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.
    I'm puzzled sometimes with statements like this. People will go on an elliptical, run, or do yoga and love it, but say that weight lifting is boring when there's much more variety in ways of doing it. I mean, you can only really run a couple of ways, and the same with elliptical. Yoga is a lot of pose and hold. And for an hour it's the same repetitious motions. So I do the Spock eyebrow raise sometimes.
    IMO, most feel it's boring because they lack knowledge on how to lift correctly and have a well put together regimen. Going from machine 1 to machine 20 isn't always the best way to do a program. Nor is doing the same lifting workout week in and week out if you're a person that likes variety. There are thousands of programs that can be assembled for ways of lifting you like. Find someone or a site that can help you with that.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png





  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.
    I'm puzzled sometimes with statements like this. People will go on an elliptical, run, or do yoga and love it, but say that weight lifting is boring when there's much more variety in ways of doing it. I mean, you can only really run a couple of ways, and the same with elliptical. Yoga is a lot of pose and hold. And for an hour it's the same repetitious motions. So I do the Spock eyebrow raise sometimes.
    IMO, most feel it's boring because they lack knowledge on how to lift correctly and have a well put together regimen. Going from machine 1 to machine 20 isn't always the best way to do a program. Nor is doing the same lifting workout week in and week out if you're a person that likes variety. There are thousands of programs that can be assembled for ways of lifting you like. Find someone or a site that can help you with that.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png





    My husband does not lift because it is boring (his words, not mine.) According to him, having to rest between sets is the boring part. I have suggested supersetting lifts or doing a circuit (we have a home gym so it's easy to customize a circuit without annoying anybody else) in order to do less resting/thumb-twiddling. He hasn't done either yet but those are two ways that could help alleviate boredom.

    I think we all find different things boring though. He used to play basketball and I attended every game all through high school even though I find the sport mind numbingly boring to watch and worse to play.
  • yesimpson
    yesimpson Posts: 1,372 Member
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    If you think it's boring, find another way to approach it. There are other ways to get resistance training in without lifting barbells if that's what you don't like. I don't enjoy it, but a good mix of kettlebells, basic lifts like squats and deadlifts, and trying new movements every couple of weeks keeps me reasonably interested so I fit it in once or twice a week. It's not my main priority but it has benefits, so I appreciate it for what it is and don't expect to get the same sense of fulfillment from it that I do from running. You don't have to love lifting, and if you don't that's OK, but you can get a good workout done in half an hour so you shouldn't have too much time to get bored!
  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member
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    rainbowbow wrote: »
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.

    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    :expressionless:

    Anyways, if you don't enjoy something the liklihood of you keeping it up is pretty low. In my opinion, you should find something that challenges you that you enjoy doing and can maintain forever. You don't HAVE to lift weights to have a nice physique, be strong, or "be cool" despite what everyone on MFP says.

    The OP asked how she could start loving it not how she could do something else instead. More weight
    is certainly one way to make it anything but boring. Mindlessly curling 3 lb dumbbells for 100 reps can certainly be boring but squatting a 1 RM isn't so boring as intimidating and scary. Different lifts and routines is another way to ease the boredom.

    For the OP, what kind of lifting are you doing and what are your goals? If your goals and routine match there isn't much to say. If your goals and routine aren't a match we have room to work with you.
  • AbigailC17
    AbigailC17 Posts: 78 Member
    edited February 2016
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    Yep, we cannot make you like weightlifting. You have to "like" it. I started to like it when I saw my body change faster than just doing cardio by itself. I did Zumba, body combat, and all other classes (all considered cardio). It all ended up into a disappointment till I did my research about women weightlifting. Once I started seeing results, I CANNOT STOP. I always look forward to go at my gym!!!
  • ydyms
    ydyms Posts: 266 Member
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    Op here. Right now my goal is maintenance. I'd love to reduce BF'ing % which is why I'd love to love lifting:)
    Some of you gave great advice and I thank you for that!
  • blues4miles
    blues4miles Posts: 1,481 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.

    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    I don't know. I run and have heard people say they don't want to run because it's "too boring". Or they can't run more than x miles because it's too boring. But I think for a lot of these people, it's more about being able to push past the pain of not quitting when it gets too hard (and I don't really mean physical 'ouch I'm hurting' pain, but like don't give up and start walking or mental pain). So I think people can say 'too boring' when they mean 'too hard and I'm not motivated to keep pushing.'

    I struggle to regularly weight lift as well, but I really want and really need to make it a part of my routine. I like the ideas for an awesome playlist, might try that next time. I am usually walking back and forth between the room where my weights are and the room where my entertainment is. Maybe it would help if I took more time to setup in front of the TV or something. But then, laziness and avoiding too much setup is for sure a big part of my problem. Stronglifts is great because it's easy for me to just remember and do without too much changing plates around or looking at my notes to remember what I'm supposed to do next.
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
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    Ok, what - exactly - do you find boring about it?

    What - exactly - is your current lifting routine?
  • ElizabethOakes2
    ElizabethOakes2 Posts: 1,038 Member
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    I have my fitness gear in front of the TV. If I want to watch a show, I have to be working, either hula hooping, or weight training. It's gotten to the point where if I just curl up to watch a show, I feel like I need to get up and move.
  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.

    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    I don't know. I run and have heard people say they don't want to run because it's "too boring". Or they can't run more than x miles because it's too boring. But I think for a lot of these people, it's more about being able to push past the pain of not quitting when it gets too hard (and I don't really mean physical 'ouch I'm hurting' pain, but like don't give up and start walking or mental pain). So I think people can say 'too boring' when they mean 'too hard and I'm not motivated to keep pushing.'

    I struggle to regularly weight lift as well, but I really want and really need to make it a part of my routine. I like the ideas for an awesome playlist, might try that next time. I am usually walking back and forth between the room where my weights are and the room where my entertainment is. Maybe it would help if I took more time to setup in front of the TV or something. But then, laziness and avoiding too much setup is for sure a big part of my problem. Stronglifts is great because it's easy for me to just remember and do without too much changing plates around or looking at my notes to remember what I'm supposed to do next.

    I agree with all of this.

    I wouldn't say I found running boring except maybe the treadmill. I don't get that rush from running like I do when lifting but I would never call it boring if I am outside.

    If I was lifting in a haphazard and unstructured way I would probably feel bored too just like the treadmill. Lifting in a structured program with heavy weight is much more enjoyable just like running outside or HIIT when doing cardio.

    I am betting there is some lifting the OP will enjoy just as there is some types of cardio to enjoy.
  • drachfit
    drachfit Posts: 217 Member
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    treat it like a sport. every lift is a different "event" and training isn't just working out, it's PRACTICE. each lift is a technical skill so there is always something to work on technique wise. if you learn good enough technique to go heavy, you will see there is also a psychological element to it as well. lifting, as a sport, is a test of your ability to be honest with yourself, to plan realistically, and to stick with the plan. it's also a measure of how well you can develop a technical skill.
  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,298 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    ydyms wrote: »
    I hate it cuz it's boring.
    I'm puzzled sometimes with statements like this. People will go on an elliptical, run, or do yoga and love it, but say that weight lifting is boring when there's much more variety in ways of doing it. I mean, you can only really run a couple of ways, and the same with elliptical. Yoga is a lot of pose and hold. And for an hour it's the same repetitious motions. So I do the Spock eyebrow raise sometimes.
    IMO, most feel it's boring because they lack knowledge on how to lift correctly and have a well put together regimen. Going from machine 1 to machine 20 isn't always the best way to do a program. Nor is doing the same lifting workout week in and week out if you're a person that likes variety. There are thousands of programs that can be assembled for ways of lifting you like. Find someone or a site that can help you with that.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Personal preference. Or what they mean when they say bored isn't what you're thinking.

    I find lifting boring. It's the same frigging routine over and over again, yet it's hard work and requires concentration while lifting so I can't just turn my brain to other things to entertain myself. Between sets, I'm either too pooped to think of anything but how tired I am and dread the next set, or I'm not and I wait just long enough to drop my heart rate. My HR drops quickly. To add insult to injury, I hate going to the gym. It's a pain in the *kitten* and adds an additional 30-45 to the workout time.

    I find running on any equipment to be boring too - can't turn my brain to other things there because I run up on the front of the machine and screw up my stride. Plus, something about an treadmill makes my knees feel weird.

    On the other hand, I can run around a 1/10 mile indoor track for 12 miles and be fine (done it) if I have something to think about. My brain doesn't need to be involved much in a steady state free run.

    I run outside and enjoy it even though it is pretty much always the same path because it is picturesque and I love looking at the scenery, the wildlife and the stars at night. I've ended up running miles more than I had planned just because (and sometimes hurting myself as a result).
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,209 Member
    edited February 2016
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    Or . . . . they just think it's boring.
    Not everyone likes to lift weights.

    It's rare to feel boredom when struggling to complete a difficult task. Boredom emerges from a lack of being challenged.

    If all we do is fun stuff, we never grow. The irony is that unpleasant tasks can become enjoyable through repetition and/or a change in perspective. The right music can help too, as can following the right lifting program. :+1:
  • mean_and_lean
    mean_and_lean Posts: 164 Member
    edited February 2016
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    Or . . . . they just think it's boring.
    Not everyone likes to lift weights.

    It's rare to feel boredom when struggling to complete a difficult task. Boredom emerges from a lack of being challenged.

    If all we do is fun stuff, we never grow. The irony is that unpleasant tasks can become enjoyable through repetition and/or a change in perspective. The right music can help too, as can following the right lifting program. :+1:

    *shrugs* To each their own. I lift and I like it but I know plenty of people who don't lift because they don't like it or do it because the all mighty THEY said that's what they have to do. Everyone needs to find something that they're going to stick with. If lifting isn't something that one is enthused about then why should they feel they have to do it? Perhaps their boredom lies from the rest in between sets or they just plain don't like it.

    And no, unpleasant tasks don't always become enjoyable. I find cleaning the house unpleasant and no matter how many times I did it it never became "enjoyable" so instead of being miserable and cranky because I had to do that chore which I hated I hired someone to do it instead and now I can use that time to do something that I do enjoy.
  • LKArgh
    LKArgh Posts: 5,179 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    Or . . . . they just think it's boring.
    Not everyone likes to lift weights.

    It's rare to feel boredom when struggling to complete a difficult task. Boredom emerges from a lack of being challenged.

    If all we do is fun stuff, we never grow. The irony is that unpleasant tasks can become enjoyable through repetition and/or a change in perspective. The right music can help too, as can following the right lifting program. :+1:

    Why bother to complete a difficult task you could jsut not complete at all, since it is a choice? This makes no sense. If I hate X training routine, why do it and keep doing it, when I could simply do something else I enjoy instead.
    This is me and cycling: I hate it. Have tried it since I was a kid. I am now 40, still hate it. Have tried outdoors, street, park, country, indoors, spinning. No, hate it It never became enjoyable. Spinning had an appeal for a short while, then no more. Why would I keep pushing myself to do it, when there are so many other things I love?
  • Wheelhouse15
    Wheelhouse15 Posts: 5,575 Member
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    No one can make you love lifting but the best ways to learn how yourself would be 1) get involved with a community of lifters that will help challenge and encourage you; 2) find goals to achieve and work towards them. The biggest reasons why people tend to find an activity either rewarding or boring seem to be things related to finding people they like who also do it and to find a way to challenge themselves. If you just go in by yourself and do the same thing with the same weights and nobody cares you aren't going to find it very rewarding, but if you have people who will give you encouragement and you can challenge yourself to pickup a bigger weight than you ever thought you could then you will likely find it much more rewarding and you won't mind the work it takes.

    I certainly would be bored if I just went in and benched 135 pounds every day for a year and just went home but if I'm posting on my wall how I fought to pull up 400 pounds off the floor 4 times that's a lot more interesting because the struggle pays off in the end and your friends who lift know how hard you worked to get there. It's a big difference mentally even though the activity is essentially the same.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,209 Member
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    aggelikik wrote: »
    Why bother to complete a difficult task you could jsut not complete at all, since it is a choice?

    Ask the OP - she's the one who wants to love it. Maybe it's because of the long list of benefits. She did say she feels great afterward, so she's halfway to liking it. :+1:
  • blues4miles
    blues4miles Posts: 1,481 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    Or . . . . they just think it's boring.
    Not everyone likes to lift weights.

    It's rare to feel boredom when struggling to complete a difficult task. Boredom emerges from a lack of being challenged.

    Again, I think a lot of people say 'x is boring' when they really mean 'x is hard'. Is running really boring? Just going faster to kill yourself/challenge yourself isn't the answer. A lot of people say running is boring because it's hard for them to run more 10 minutes or push themselves more than a mile.

    Maybe lifting is the same. I don't think making it harder will make it easier for these people to do it. Making progress and seeing results can help. But if you never get past that stage, you may never appreciate it. I'm not going to knock anyone who has to use any gimmicks to get themselves lifting. Plenty of people use gimmicks (apps or games) to get themselves running.
  • Wheelhouse15
    Wheelhouse15 Posts: 5,575 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    If it's boring, the weight is too light. :+1:

    Or . . . . they just think it's boring.
    Not everyone likes to lift weights.

    It's rare to feel boredom when struggling to complete a difficult task. Boredom emerges from a lack of being challenged.

    Again, I think a lot of people say 'x is boring' when they really mean 'x is hard'. Is running really boring? Just going faster to kill yourself/challenge yourself isn't the answer. A lot of people say running is boring because it's hard for them to run more 10 minutes or push themselves more than a mile.

    Maybe lifting is the same. I don't think making it harder will make it easier for these people to do it. Making progress and seeing results can help. But if you never get past that stage, you may never appreciate it. I'm not going to knock anyone who has to use any gimmicks to get themselves lifting. Plenty of people use gimmicks (apps or games) to get themselves running.

    I have to agree that many people give up because something is hard and might say it's boring when they really mean they just don't like the work it takes to get better at it. I think the difficulty plus lack of knowledge of the activity might make it seem boring. People think running is just putting one foot in front of the other really fast and that lifting is just picking things up and putting them back down. In a completely reductionist view, sure, but the reality is that the training methods and skills required to become really good at them are often very deep and nuanced. Once you learn more about training methods etc you can actually find it's not simple at all.