overhead press plateau

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Replies

  • ArmyofAdrian
    ArmyofAdrian Posts: 177 Member
    Flex your glutes and quads as you press. This will allow you to press more weight. Also experiment with different grips. Check out alan thrall on YouTube how to overhead press. Also athlean x on YouTube.
  • Meganthedogmom
    Meganthedogmom Posts: 1,641 Member
    Oh boy, OP - I feel you, but I would take the suggestions of following the SL 5x5 program, including what to do when you hit a plateau/failure.

    I just started this program a few weeks ago. Today I did 60lb OHP and man it was not easy! Us women typically struggle in the upper body strength department. You may need to figure out smaller increments, but right now I would follow the program and see what you can do. Don't be scared!

    I am following the program. and I'm not scared. I just want to make sure I'm not going to injure myself and set myself way back by pushing myself too hard.

    You shouldn't injure yourself if you're using proper form and following the program (I.e. Not skipping through and lifting more than called for) or following the modified version for women who need to go up by increments of 2.5lb instead of 5lb.
  • AlphaCajun
    AlphaCajun Posts: 290 Member
    jimmmer wrote: »
    AlphaCajun wrote: »
    Yep, if you're finishing 5x5, add weight. If you fail, it'll hold you there next session. You say you aren't progressing or getting stronger and by refusing to add weight... you're right! You have to fail to succeed in progressive lifting. OHP was my first failure, I've since failed on it twice and bench once (11 weeks in).

    I'm not finishing 5x5, I've only been doing it for a month. my overhead press, benchpress, and bentover row aren't even up to olympic barbell weight yet. I started out only lifting 15lbs to get stronger and focus on form. you have a point though. I need to at least try to add some weight.

    It's confusingly written, but I think he means: "If you are completing all reps in your 5x5, increase weight next session". Finish, as in completing all 25 reps successfully....

    This. Thank you for clarifying it for me lol exactly what I meant but poorly worded.

    And OP... for the record I failed to complete all five sets on OHP yet again today. The fifth rep on the fourth set didn't want to play nice lol but that's all part of the plan so don't let it get in your head, you're a warrior regardless of what bar you're lifting...
  • ObsidianMist
    ObsidianMist Posts: 519 Member
    You shouldn't injure yourself if you're using proper form and following the program (I.e. Not skipping through and lifting more than called for) or following the modified version for women who need to go up by increments of 2.5lb instead of 5lb.

    unfortunately with what's available to me at my gym I have no choice but to go up 5lbs at a time.
    AlphaCajun wrote: »
    ... for the record I failed to complete all five sets on OHP yet again today. The fifth rep on the fourth set didn't want to play nice lol but that's all part of the plan so don't let it get in your head, you're a warrior regardless of what bar you're lifting...

    thanks :)
  • jimmmer
    jimmmer Posts: 3,535 Member
    Oh boy, OP - I feel you, but I would take the suggestions of following the SL 5x5 program, including what to do when you hit a plateau/failure.

    I just started this program a few weeks ago. Today I did 60lb OHP and man it was not easy! Us women typically struggle in the upper body strength department. You may need to figure out smaller increments, but right now I would follow the program and see what you can do. Don't be scared!

    I am following the program. and I'm not scared. I just want to make sure I'm not going to injure myself and set myself way back by pushing myself too hard.

    You shouldn't injure yourself if you're using proper form and following the program (I.e. Not skipping through and lifting more than called for) or following the modified version for women who need to go up by increments of 2.5lb instead of 5lb.

    Not to be nit-picky, but three things:

    1) Some people have "crappy form" and never get injured.
    2) Some people who have "crisp form" do get injured.
    3) By definition no beginner/novice has "proper form" - part of navigating the novice stage is roughly hewing your form into something less biomechanically awful as you go and reaping the neural-efficiency gains. (I mean, you'll never stop working on it if you keep lifting longer term, but the adjustments will be finer as you get further along.)