CrossFit?

What do you all think of CrossFit?
«1

Replies

  • aub6689
    aub6689 Posts: 351 Member
    Is this a trap? It looks like you are doing crossfit in your profile pic....
  • jimmmer
    jimmmer Posts: 3,535 Member
    HelloDan wrote: »
    Its a method of training. Like all methods of training, it's as good as the people coaching/leading it, and the person doing it and their ability to do things properly, rather than going for records.

    There's a lot of hate for crossfit, but I don't see the problem. It's not my thing, but if it introduces people to fitness and gets them active, all good.
    Yes, there are people who are overzealous, who risk injuries, think things like ripping callouses and throwing up are cool. However there are also people who do equally stupid things like going for bench presses way beyond their strength, lifting with awful form, not using spotters or safety bars, but no one inherently thinks lifting is bad because of these guys and girls.

    100% in agreement.
  • cmarangi
    cmarangi Posts: 131 Member
    I love it. But you have to be smart. I'm 44 so I don't expect to do the things that the 20 somethings are doing, and I'm super careful about knowing my limits. Make sure the coach is good and giving common sense advice. Make sure the coach goes over form, EVERY TIME even if you know what you are doing. Don't add weight until you know your form is good.

    It challenges me and I've never been this strong, so I'm a cross fit believer.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,082 Member
    HelloDan wrote: »
    Its a method of training. Like all methods of training, it's as good as the people coaching/leading it, and the person doing it and their ability to do things properly, rather than going for records.

    There's a lot of hate for crossfit, but I don't see the problem. It's not my thing, but if it introduces people to fitness and gets them active, all good.
    Yes, there are people who are overzealous, who risk injuries, think things like ripping callouses and throwing up are cool. However there are also people who do equally stupid things like going for bench presses way beyond their strength, lifting with awful form, not using spotters or safety bars, but no one inherently thinks lifting is bad because of these guys and girls.

    Pretty much agree with this...though I do think one of the issues with CF is the whole group pressure thing that can sometimes make people push beyond what they are actually capable of. It really depends on the box too...I've been to some pretty crappy boxes.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,210 Member
    mjudd1990 wrote: »
    As a budding orthopaedic surgeon, I love it. Crossfit is gonna help put my kids through college.

    Actually, runners will. New runners have a 20-26% injury rate, depending on which study you look at. And there are way more runners than Crossfitters. You'll be rich. :+1:
  • thatjeffsmith
    thatjeffsmith Posts: 110 Member
    Give it a shot Jessie..most CrossFit gyms are super-open to new folks. I had zero experience going into it, weightlifting or gymnastics, and I was made to feel very welcome and unjudged.
  • MudRunChica
    MudRunChica Posts: 24 Member
    I am endurance athlete turned body builder turned power lifter turned crossfitter. I've never been more happy with my training and my body as I have been since switching to crossfit. I've been at it for six months now and (so far) no one at my box has had any injuries. The coaches are amazing and have a basis in power and oly lifting, so form is always paramount.
  • webbz92
    webbz92 Posts: 38 Member
    I've been thinking about trying it out. There are 3 boxes in town. I think it would be a good way to learn proper weight lifting form without hiring a personal trainer. I just need to get up some courage and some $$
  • GiddyupTim
    GiddyupTim Posts: 2,819 Member
    mjudd1990 wrote: »
    As a budding orthopaedic surgeon, I love it. Crossfit is gonna help put my kids through college.

    I so hate it when doctors say things like this.
    There is a guy I meet at the pull-up bars at the park. He says: "My friend is an orthopedist. He says nobody over 50 years should run because he sees former runners whose hips are shot!"
    I have another friend -- a physician -- with whom I play tennis, who says his orthopedist tells him that he sees all kinds of Crossfit people, including one who tore his Achilles tendon doing box jumps. This orthopedist, my friend says, contends that Crossfit is INCREDIBLY dangerous!
    Now, you would think that doctors, of all people, would understand that they see only those people who are injured. They have no idea how many people actually do a thing, and they have no idea what the rate of injury is if they are only judging from what comes in their door.
    Plus, my guess is that being out of shape is a much bigger threat to your health and happiness than any form of popular exercise is.
    I'll take my chances.
    AND, it so happens that the best study of rates of injury in Crossfit suggests that the rate is comparable to the injury rate of weight lifting generally, which is much lower than the rates for jogging and/or for cutting-and-running sports like basketball, soccer, tennis, etc.
    Maybe we should all avoid those sports too, doc?
  • maranarasauce93
    maranarasauce93 Posts: 293 Member
    I have a love/hate relationship with crossfit. I love that it challenges people to push themselves to reach new heights and set new goals. Hate that people feel pressured to do all the reps as fast as possible. As long as you don't do anything stupid and you know your limits, I think it can definitely be a good workout program. Also, if it weren't for crossfit, I would probably not have developed a love for deadlifts and in turn powerlifting. So thank you, for that Crossfit!

    Crossfit is also dependent on the box you go to. If coaches are knowledgeable and ensure their clients are improving form before going HAM with weights or reps, then that's awesome! Unfortunately, there are coaches out there that may only have a level 1 and know jack shiite about form or a gym might have too small of a coach to client ratio. In those situations, crossfit can definitely be much more dangerous. At the end of the day it's about the box, the coaches, and the client.
  • flippy1234
    flippy1234 Posts: 686 Member
    Crossfit is really hard. There is no real pressure to keep up but once you are there, participating, you push yourself harder than you normally would. I have seen nasty injuries. The first time I tried it, I had to run to the bathroom and throw up and I was in great shape.
    I am even in better shape now at 51 and doing weights and HIIT and in way better shape than when I did cross fit. No more. It's definitely for the young, and slightly crazy. It does have its place. I can spot a cross fitter anywhere. They have a certain build....
  • mjudd1990
    mjudd1990 Posts: 222 Member
    Obviously all sports/physical activities carry with them an inherent risk of injury. And of course inactivity and sedentary lifestyles are much more at fault for most of the health problems we see than some weekend warrior trying to do hang snatches for time. As a health care professional, I'll try to refrain from sarcasm or having a sense of humor from now on.
  • LazSommer
    LazSommer Posts: 1,855 Member
    Insert anecdotal evidence here.
  • Upstate_Dunadan
    Upstate_Dunadan Posts: 435 Member
    tufel wrote: »
    mjudd1990 wrote: »
    As a budding orthopaedic surgeon, I love it. Crossfit is gonna help put my kids through college.

    I so hate it when doctors say things like this.
    There is a guy I meet at the pull-up bars at the park. He says: "My friend is an orthopedist. He says nobody over 50 years should run because he sees former runners whose hips are shot!"
    I have another friend -- a physician -- with whom I play tennis, who says his orthopedist tells him that he sees all kinds of Crossfit people, including one who tore his Achilles tendon doing box jumps. This orthopedist, my friend says, contends that Crossfit is INCREDIBLY dangerous!
    Now, you would think that doctors, of all people, would understand that they see only those people who are injured. They have no idea how many people actually do a thing, and they have no idea what the rate of injury is if they are only judging from what comes in their door.
    Plus, my guess is that being out of shape is a much bigger threat to your health and happiness than any form of popular exercise is.
    I'll take my chances.
    AND, it so happens that the best study of rates of injury in Crossfit suggests that the rate is comparable to the injury rate of weight lifting generally, which is much lower than the rates for jogging and/or for cutting-and-running sports like basketball, soccer, tennis, etc.
    Maybe we should all avoid those sports too, doc?

    I'm with you. Many doctors act like they had not practice or livelihood whatsoever before CrossFit came around. Not.

    I think all they can really say is close to 100% of the injured CrossFitters they see got injured doing CrossFit. At the same time, the same can be said for Tennis, Gold, Bowling, Soccer, Football, or any other sport that can lead to injury.

    I've injured myself 2 times while doing CrossFit in the past year.

    1st - I strained a muscle in my quad doing a basic lunge with a plate overhead. Funny thing, I did the same thing about the year before in the gym on my own (before starting CrossFit) doing Bulgarian Split Squat.

    2nd - I strained ligaments in my shoulder warming up for a bench press progression. It wasn't heavy weight, or a timed WOD, and bench press isn't unique to CrossFit. It was just one of those stupid things.

    Overall, I actually find my self being injured less (that's not the same as being less sore, trust me) doing CrossFit than when I was lifting in the gym on my own. Chalk that up to having a coach that watches my form closely, and if he isn't happy with something I'm doing, he's not going to stay quiet.

    I say try CrossFit out and make up your own mind. My wife started earlier this year after watching me for quite a while and she loves it. It's the first real exercise that has hooked her since she was in college 20+ years ago. It's honestly changing her life, already changed mine, and might be just what the doctor (a different one) ordered.
  • giantrobot_powerlifting
    giantrobot_powerlifting Posts: 2,600 Member
    What do I think? I generally approve of CF (not like my approval matters) but high rep cleans, jerks and snatches I see no need for since they are technical lifts. Otherwise, its good exercise and while it is not necessarily training, its a pretty sound methodology to become/stay fit. I know lots of awesome CFers in my small community and I like them, even if they confuse my powerlifting training with Olympic weighlifting all the time. I can't stand the founder Glassman though.
  • RollTideTri
    RollTideTri Posts: 116 Member
    Cherimoose wrote: »
    mjudd1990 wrote: »
    As a budding orthopaedic surgeon, I love it. Crossfit is gonna help put my kids through college.

    Actually, runners will. New runners have a 20-26% injury rate, depending on which study you look at. And there are way more runners than Crossfitters. You'll be rich. :+1:

    Let's not get carried away. How many running injuries are of the "OMG I need an orthopedic surgeon" variety? Not many. Not many people getting surgery for shin splints and other new runner injuries.
  • caitlinrn83
    caitlinrn83 Posts: 178 Member
    I'm an ortho/trauma nurse. Aside from the obvious car/motorcycle/ATV accidents and anything involving alcohol, you know what I see most? Sedentary people (or people who are lightly active but without resistance training) who break hips. Very overweight people needing knee replacements. Granted, I work in a hospital so I don't see outpatient cases, but the surgeons I've talked to all say the same thing. It's inactivity, not activity, that will put their kids through school.

    This, this, this, this, this.