How To Eat For Maximum Muscle Growth At Any Age

Wetcoaster
Wetcoaster Posts: 1,789 Member
Layne Norton wrote an interesting article at bodybuilding.com last month.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/how-to-eat-for-max-muscle-growth-at-any-age

Some take homes......




Muscle-building protein recommendations by age:

< 18 years: 0.6-0.8 grams per pound of body weight
19-40 years: 0.8-1.1 grams per pound of body weight
41-65 years: 1.1-1.3 grams per pound of body weight
> 65 years: 1.3-1.5 grams per pound of body weight


Muscle-building carbohydrate recommendations by age:

< 20 years: 1.8-2.6 grams per pound of body weight
21-40 years: 1.5-2.3 grams per pound of body weight
41-65 years: 1.2-2 grams per pound of body weight
> 65 years: 0.8-1.7 grams per pound of body weight


Muscle growth fat recommendations by age:

< 20 years: 0.25-0.45 grams per pound of body weight
21-40 years: 0.35-0.55 grams per pound of body weight
41-65 years: 0.45-0.65 grams per pound of body weight
> 65 years: 0.55-0.75 grams per pound of body weight





Replies

  • cecsav1
    cecsav1 Posts: 714 Member
    Sooooo... doing the math, I should eat anywhere from 2185.95 and 3283.35 calories? Just because I'm 36 and weigh 177 pounds? Although the article does specify it's for muscle building and not fat loss, it does not address amount of activity or even gender. I don't buy it.
  • Wetcoaster
    Wetcoaster Posts: 1,789 Member
    cecsav1 wrote: »
    Sooooo... doing the math, I should eat anywhere from 2185.95 and 3283.35 calories? Just because I'm 36 and weigh 177 pounds? Although the article does specify it's for muscle building and not fat loss, it does not address amount of activity or even gender. I don't buy it.

    I was more interested in which micros you should use as you get older. If it is on that site it geared towards people who take training seriously.
  • NealNH
    NealNH Posts: 104 Member
    But then there is this actual study which indicates that older adults should probably have much more protein than previously recommended.

    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10522-016-9637-9
  • Wetcoaster
    Wetcoaster Posts: 1,789 Member
    There are also links to studies in the article he wrote.
  • rainbowbow
    rainbowbow Posts: 7,491 Member
    edited June 2016
    I'm just going to throw out there that his recommendations are close to or similar to the National Academy of Sports Medicine's guidelines as well as the American Dietary Recommendations for active individuals, however, they base this number not off of bodyweight but total lean body mass.

    Recommendations for protein intake for sedentary individuals are .8-1g per pound KG body weight. (which is about half the recommendation for active individuals).

    In any case, to the individual above... this is the recommendation for "gaining" muscle mass. not for individuals who needs to lose weight, body fat, etc. and i believe should be used more as a general guideline. Not necessarily exact.
  • ilex70
    ilex70 Posts: 727 Member
    Looks a lot like 33% protein/37% carbohydrate/30% fat if anyone wants to fiddle with it.

    Out of curiosity I used the lower end of the ranges (female) and calculated by lean mass, goal weight (presuming this is targeting relatively lean people), and current weight.

    Biggest difference for me, even with the lowest multiplier my protein could be a bit higher. I don't think it is terribly low or anything, just maybe could be a bit better if you really do need more based on age vs. the general rule of thumb.
  • mathiseasy
    mathiseasy Posts: 165 Member
    I thought that rule of thumb was per kilogram, not pound of body weight. That cuts those numbers about in half.
  • RoxieDawn
    RoxieDawn Posts: 15,491 Member
    Just to throw this out there, I am 47 and I use the 19-40 rule on protein and fat, and carbs are what ever is left. I am already at a lower weight and no need to even be in my age group to bulk according to those macros.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,475 Member
    mathiseasy wrote: »
    I thought that rule of thumb was per kilogram, not pound of body weight. That cuts those numbers about in half.

    The rule of thumb can be in any units of the writer's choosing, of course.

    Some recommendations are phrased in terms of lean body mass, some in terms of goal (or healthy) weight, some in terms of "body weight" without specifying; sometimes the units are pounds, sometimes they're kilograms.

    Since the recommendations from the weight-training/body-building communities when given in pounds often have the same numeric value as some general-nutrition folks' recommendations when given in kilograms, I don't think you can make that assumption you're making. It misunderstands what (some) people mean.

    Putting it in a different way: Sometimes you see folks make a mistake using the wrong units; other times they disagree about the actual recommendation . IMO, in general, the heavy-lifters tend to recommend higher, mainstream nutrition-ers in the middle, and the USDA and some vegan advocacy sources down at the low end. Part of the difference is "optimal" vs. "minimal", part situational, part just opinion.
  • bioklutz
    bioklutz Posts: 1,365 Member
    Thanks for posting this. I guess I need to up my protein a little bit more!
  • mlee981
    mlee981 Posts: 18 Member
    Simple - eat well and lift heavy.

    Whole foods, eat enough, eat balanced meals, no junk. Lift heavy, rest.

    Don't complicate it.