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Diabetes / Insulin sensitivity

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Replies

  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    That could well be. I hope they figure it out in my lifetime. I'd like to know.
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    That could well be. I hope they figure it out in my lifetime. I'd like to know.

    There's been a fair amount written on the correlation between sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and metabolic syndrome/T2D.

    Here's a recent meta-analysis:
    http://m.care.diabetesjournals.org/content/33/11/2477.full.pdf
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    RalfLott wrote: »
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    That could well be. I hope they figure it out in my lifetime. I'd like to know.

    There's been a fair amount written on the correlation between sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and metabolic syndrome/T2D.

    Here's a recent meta-analysis:
    http://m.care.diabetesjournals.org/content/33/11/2477.full.pdf

    Interesting. Thanks. :)
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    edited March 2016
    Here's a Bloomberg opinion piece on Asian countries' push to levy sugar taxes in order to curb consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

    Not surprisingly, Coca-Cola and other carb-peddling charter members of Big Sugar are not going down without a fight. Following the lead of Big Tobacco decades earlier, BS intends to spend billions building markets in developing Asian countries, as health-conscious western countries reduce their sugar consumption:
    http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2016-02-23/soda-taxes-can-protect-health-in-asia

    There's also the depressing yet fascinating international diabetes atlas project:
    Http://www.Diabetesatlas.org

    From the 2015 executive summary:
    IDF’s call for action

    IDF’s mission is to promote diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide and it takes a leading role in influencing policy, increasing public awareness and encouraging improvements in health.

    Notably in 2015, the United Nations Member States adopted the Sustainable Development Goals which included targets on non-communicable diseases. The previous Millennium Development Goals had omitted diabetes and other non-communicable diseases which presented an obstacle to establishing
    resources and political focus to tackle diabetes.

    During the 2015 G7 Summit, IDF launched a call to action for all G7 nations to develop and implement cost-effective policies to improve the health outcomes for people with diabetes and to prevent new cases.

    In 2015, IDF published its Framework for Action on Sugar, which recognises the important role that excess sugar consumption has in increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, and presents a series of policy initiatives aimed at reducing consumption of sugar and increasing production and availability of more healthy foods.

    As part of IDF’s work with The European
    Connected Health Alliance to create a global network of Diabetes Aware Cities, IDF piloted the Diabetes Prevention Score in 2015. This will enable cities globally to assess how their urban environments can be improved to support prevention of type 2 diabetes in communities.

    By continuing to increase awareness of diabetes and promote care and prevention, IDF hopes that today’s estimates for 2040 will be purely hypothetical.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    Thanks. Those are indeed depressing yet fascinating links. ;)
  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,478 Member
    Progression of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion over 5 years. Orange arrows started with Normal Glucose Tolerance, pale blue with Impaired Glucose Tolerance and darker blue with Diabetes Mellitus. Reported here . If your Acute Insulin Response (y-axis) can respond to a decline in insulin sensitivity (x-axis) you're OK, if not you're progressing towards diabetes.
    F1.medium.gif


  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,478 Member
    Table 3 of this study shows the change in variables over 5 years when following the change in insulin sensitivity (above graph). This does not show a statistically significant difference in the change of either BMI or waist circumference between individuals who had normal glucose tolerance at baseline and either retained it or progressed to impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. In this case the mean BMI increase was smallest in those progressing from normal glucose tolerance to diabetes.
    wmhc5lyf3wn9.png
  • mommarnurse
    mommarnurse Posts: 515 Member
    Maintaining a healthy body fat% followed by regular cardio and strength training are it for preventing diabetes. Once you HAVE it though, the focus should be on obtaining those two things with a focus on limiting the carbs.
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    yarwell wrote: »
    If your Acute Insulin Response (y-axis) can respond to a decline in insulin sensitivity (x-axis) you're OK, if not you're progressing towards diabetes.

    Interesting. Thanks for the info (and please keep it coming).

  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,478 Member
    "Exercise Training, Without Weight Loss, Increases Insulin Sensitivity" http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/26/3/557

    Exercise increased SI (2.54 ± 2.74 vs. 4.41 ± 3.30 μU · ml−1 · min−1, P < 0.005) in previously sedentary adults. 6 months of walk training (intensity 45–55 or 65–75% heart rate reserve, frequency 3–4 or 5–7 days/week, duration 30 min/session).
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    Insulin resistance & keto carb targets

    Stephen Phinney related this observation from Tim Noakes:
    The more insulin resistant a person is, the further they have to go down the carbohydrate intake scale to drop down toward the improved metabolic condition and to get out of the damaging zone as a result of carb intake.

    It seems obvious once you hear it, but it's another reminder that one size just don't fit us all.
  • Tama072015
    Tama072015 Posts: 30 Member
    I am type 1 diabetic. I have spent 32 years working on what works best for me. I do think it is person to person. I find that when I am not overweight that a very low processed carb diet works well for me needing very little insulin. I eat natural carbs and don't need a great deal of insulin. Examples are things like fruits (not fruit juice ever) and veggies. If I am not overweight and eat processed crap, I need tons of insulin and it may go on for hours before the blood glucose goes to a normal reading. If I am overweight, I need more insulin for processed or non. I also do not live like the typical diabetic. If I need to lose weight, I eat less food. I intermittent fast and I eat 1000 or under calories. I no longer subscribe to breakfast, lunch and dinner. I eat only when I am hungry and I I am not hungry I do not try to make up calories for the day by eating them. It is a great deal of work to monitor the diabetes and the macros/calories etc, but this is what works for me. I suppose my diet could closest be paleo but I don't necessarily follow that plan. I just like meat,veggies and fruits and it is what works best for me as a diabetic on insulin.
  • Tama072015
    Tama072015 Posts: 30 Member
    hag48125 wrote: »
    I am type 1 diabetic. I have spent 32 years working on what works best for me. I do think it is person to person. I find that when I am not overweight that a very low processed carb diet works well for me needing very little insulin. I eat natural carbs and don't need a great deal of insulin. Examples are things like fruits (not fruit juice ever) and veggies. If I am not overweight and eat processed crap, I need tons of insulin and it may go on for hours before the blood glucose goes to a normal reading. If I am overweight, I need more insulin for processed or non. I also do not live like the typical diabetic. If I need to lose weight, I eat less food. I intermittent fast and I eat 1000 or under calories. I no longer subscribe to breakfast, lunch and dinner. I eat only when I am hungry and I I am not hungry I do not try to make up calories for the day by eating them. It is a great deal of work to monitor the diabetes and the macros/calories etc, but this is what works for me. I suppose my diet could closest be paleo but I don't necessarily follow that plan. I just like meat,veggies and fruits and it is what works best for me as a diabetic on insulin.

    And I am very active. I do believe exercise is the key to making me the healthy diabetic I am in addition to the above.
  • ForecasterJason
    ForecasterJason Posts: 2,577 Member
    I don't understand how some people can reverse their IR by eating a high carb diet (independent of weight control). Unless it's just simply that some people respond very differently to different diets, which may be why there are conflicting studies on what the optimal diet should be for those with the condition.
    http://180degreehealth.com/starch-lowers-insulin/
  • RalfLott
    RalfLott Posts: 5,036 Member
    I don't understand how some people can reverse their IR by eating a high carb diet (independent of weight control). Unless it's just simply that some people respond very differently to different diets, which may be why there are conflicting studies on what the optimal diet should be for those with the condition.
    http://180degreehealth.com/starch-lowers-insulin/

    It's a mystery to me, too. Stephen Phinney in several of his videos emphasizes that different people do better on different types of diets, and that there are indeed people built for higher carbs. (Pretty sure he's thinking high-nutrient density carbs, not white-flour waffles with corn syrup and powdered sugar and a Coke on the side.)

    But when it comes to IR..... well, that's really mysterious.. There are a lot of people following LCHF who swear by consuming small amounts of resistant starch, like potato starch (but not potato flour), on the theory that the wonders it works in your small intestine ultimately lower your IR. But there are others who warn that pulling a single starch off the taboo list is not sufficient, because you need a full range of plant nutrients to get the desired effect....

    Confusing enough that I haven't tried it yet.

    Anyone?
  • TrailNurse
    TrailNurse Posts: 359 Member
    My patients can and do get off of their diabetes medication if they maintain a low carb diet and exercise long term.