Lifting

This is my question. I've seen the b and a of lifting, HOW does one start?? As in how do I know what to do how much to do when to do? I'm 53, I have a very physical job so I don't want to hurt anything in the process, but I also can't afford a personal trainers fee. Any thoughts???

Replies

  • DetroitDarin
    DetroitDarin Posts: 955 Member
    I started simple - I want stronger arms. Standing bicep curls. 4 sets of 8-10 reps were the last rep takes some effort. Then I do triceps extensions with the rope on a machine. same deal. Then I go to seated incline curls - and lighter weight and do 15 or so; being seated helps keep me from cheating.

    Are you part of a gym? It's absolutely okay to ask other folks there...or the staff.
  • ttfnweight
    ttfnweight Posts: 202 Member
    Yep I have a gym membership but they don't have an extensive amount of weights. Mostly machines. No " kettle bells" which I read in one account was a go to. I just feel really unsure and confused by it. Though I've been wanting to do it.
  • paulbrttn
    paulbrttn Posts: 72 Member
    You can download the stronglifts 5x5 app, which is often recommended as a good place to start, and it will guide you through amount of weight and reps to do in each exercise which takes the work out of it for you.
    Not sure how little they have when you say the weights aren't extensive but pretty much all you need for the program is a barbell, weights, bench and squat rack, if they don't have at least these things it might be time to find another gym.
  • DetroitDarin
    DetroitDarin Posts: 955 Member
    There is no 'way to go' in terms of weight lifting because there are too many variables. When we target-fixate on what we read is the ideal, we can often miss out on 'pretty darn good'. :)
  • BeastField
    BeastField Posts: 463 Member
    Honestly, if you ask the staff at the gym or other people (let them finish their set), for advice, I found that most people are willing to help. People are a lot nicer at gyms than one might think. I was doing a particular lift wrong, and a very large, intimidating man came walking over to me. In the nicest voice he told me I was doing it wrong, and then helped me start doing it right.
  • RoseTheWarrior
    RoseTheWarrior Posts: 2,035 Member
    Try a good book like Starting Strength or New Rules of Lifting. Books like these give you great information on how and why. Then you can start with their program. I recommend using a program over making up something yourself if you're new to lifting. Good luck and have fun!
  • fposte2016
    fposte2016 Posts: 130 Member
    I just posted a couple of links I've found helpful. I'm just dipping my toe in as well, but have found helpful info at bodybuilding.com. There are lots of gifs and videos by trainers demonstrating proper form. I also want to read the books @RoseTheWarrior recommended. I've heard they are great places to start.
  • JenHuedy
    JenHuedy Posts: 611 Member
    The most important thing is to start with a proven routine. Random exercises are better than nothing, but a good basic plan will be more effective.

    If your gym only has machines, try the Basic Machine Program in this plan:

    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/muscle-gain/beginning-weight-training-part-4.html/

    I currently do Stronglifts 5x5, and have seen great results. I'm in better shape now at 43 than I was at 23!
  • ttfnweight
    ttfnweight Posts: 202 Member
    Jen. I totally get being in that shape at 43 because I did it myself when I was 40. I actually lost 40 lbs and kept it off for 4 years!! I never imagined I'd ever be this heavy again. My new husbands love language is food, so when he thinks of me he buys me See's Candy, Hagen Daz ice cream Pepperidge Farms cookies etc.. Also I have the dreaded Plantar Faciitis so running hurts. I'm kinda just throwing my hands up. Lol
  • ttfnweight
    ttfnweight Posts: 202 Member
    Thanks everyone for all the assist. I'll keep you posted. :)
  • malioumba
    malioumba Posts: 132 Member
    JPBgrad98 wrote: »
    Honestly, if you ask the staff at the gym or other people (let them finish their set), for advice, I found that most people are willing to help. People are a lot nicer at gyms than one might think. I was doing a particular lift wrong, and a very large, intimidating man came walking over to me. In the nicest voice he told me I was doing it wrong, and then helped me start doing it right.

    I know that sounds helpful, and it can be and perhaps it depends on the location, but I find that absolutely everyone assumes themselves to be a fitness pro and gives advice unsolicited. They always come up to me and say, "I'm a professional fitness trainer, let me show you how to do that". These days, "everyone" is a fitness trainer, and they all give very different advise. Plus, coming up to people and telling them how to do something better likely makes (some) people feel uncomfortable - confirming that they are indeed being watched and judged - the very reason (some) people avoid gyms in the first place.