Question for runners

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I just recently finished the C25k app. I haven't run a 5k yet but I am looking for one in my area. My question is about warming up. The app has you start each run with a 5 minute brisk walk. When you run a 5k how do you warm up? And how do you warm up in general when you are just going on a run? I am planning to continue running for 3 days a week just on my own and I like the 5 minute walk to start out. But I am curious if I were to run in an actual 5k event what type of warmup would be best.
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Replies

  • bboyd223
    bboyd223 Posts: 1,430 Member
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    You will have time to get your walk in. I dont walk and find that I am not 100% warm until after the first half mile. I do a lot of stretching prior to running. I would stick to what ever type of warm up you do before any run.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
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    When I am running an actual 5K race, I will run to the race site itself (if it is close) or do a quick run in the area prior to the race beginning. If I'm just going for a run, I will start with a slower run and speed up after a couple of minutes.

    Whatever works for you, I wouldn't change it on race day. If you like a five minute brisk walk before your run, you can almost always do that in the race area before the race begins.
  • fattothinmum
    fattothinmum Posts: 218 Member
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    I just continue with the warm up and down walk, however long I plan to run.
  • RunningBuryBlue
    RunningBuryBlue Posts: 25 Member
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    Be careful stretching cold muscles. Slow jog for a few mins only, deep breath, start.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,502 Member
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    If it is as well-attended as many 5K's, you could start towards the middle or back of the pack unless you think you will win. The people who want to win (and are capable) will be right at the line probably and everyone else will be stacking up behind them. For the 5K's I've run, the entire crowd starts walking towards the start line as a big group as everyone starts running when getting to the line... fanning out further to allow a little bit of distance between each other. So if you start mid-way in the group and it is a busy 5K, you'll have 1-2 min. of walking anyway. You can add a bit of walking around the area before getting in line too.
  • dopeysmelly
    dopeysmelly Posts: 1,390 Member
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    I usually run/walk briskly to the start because I'm always late!
  • EauRouge1
    EauRouge1 Posts: 265 Member
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    I've been to a few races where they have an organised warm up at the beginning, or there is a chance to have a brisk walk around.

    Not sure if Parkrun is available in the US but it's a great place to start if there is one near you.
  • 7lenny7
    7lenny7 Posts: 3,493 Member
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    When I first started running, I warmed up for a 5K by taking a brisk walk for 10 or 15 minutes, usually looking for a place to pee that didn't have a line. Once I became more experienced in much better shape, I started warming up by running 1 to 2 miles at a very slow pace, ending with a few strides. Strides are when you ramp your speed up to nearly a sprint, hold it for 10 seconds, then ramp your speed down to a low pace again. The entire sequence should take about 30 seconds.

    To warm up for a regular run I briskly walk for 5 minutes, then a slow paced run, building up to whatever pace I want that run.
  • pondee629
    pondee629 Posts: 2,469 Member
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    " But I am curious if I were to run in an actual 5k event what type of warmup would be best"

    The same warm up you have been doing for your training runs. As an example: If you've been walking five to ten minutes before your run, walk five to ten minutes before your race start. Get to the race start in enough time to do the warm up you have been used to doing and do it. These shouldn't be a different warm up for a race than what you've been doing before a training run of the same distance.
  • kgirlhart
    kgirlhart Posts: 5,015 Member
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    Thanks everyone. Running is new to me and I admit I feel a little intimidated. I'm afraid when I get there I'll look like I don't know what I'm doing. But it sounds like I will be able to walk around to warm up before the race and not look like I'm in the wrong place.
  • RunHardBeStrong
    RunHardBeStrong Posts: 33,069 Member
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    kgirlhart wrote: »
    Thanks everyone. Running is new to me and I admit I feel a little intimidated. I'm afraid when I get there I'll look like I don't know what I'm doing. But it sounds like I will be able to walk around to warm up before the race and not look like I'm in the wrong place.

    You will be just fine, there will be all kinds of runners doing their own thing. You will see all kinds of different strategies. Don't sweat it! And most of all, have fun!
  • CindyFooWho
    CindyFooWho Posts: 179 Member
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    I do jumping jacks in place because, to me, that motion is more like running than walking is, if that makes sense.
  • GiddyupTim
    GiddyupTim Posts: 2,819 Member
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    Slow jog. Maybe 10 minutes. Break a sweat. But no need to wear yourself out. Gotta keep your reserves, especially in a 5k where you might want a kick at the end.
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
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    Even while doing C25K I did about 100 squats and lunges after my warm up walk and before I started the run.
  • Glossberg
    Glossberg Posts: 40 Member
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    I've seen all kind of different approaches before a race. For me, no warm up unless it's in the 30's or cooler. Even then it's only a slow jog in place for a minute or two. To each his own.
  • nowine4me
    nowine4me Posts: 3,985 Member
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    @kgirlhart --most every race has a warm up walking running area where you can warm up first. I would suggest starting with a smaller 5k that doesn't have large crowds to get your feet wet ( for example NOT Susan G. Komen). Races where you have to stand around in corrals before the start aren't the best for a first timer. Pee first. Start slow and sprint like hell at the end. Mostly enjoy yourself, they are meant to be fun.
  • debubbie
    debubbie Posts: 767 Member
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    kgirlhart wrote: »
    Thanks everyone. Running is new to me and I admit I feel a little intimidated. I'm afraid when I get there I'll look like I don't know what I'm doing. But it sounds like I will be able to walk around to warm up before the race and not look like I'm in the wrong place.

    You won't be the only one that is doing their first race and you won't seem out of place. You will find that the running community is super supportive and will try to make every race you enter the best race that you do. My best advice is to watch starting out to fast (sometimes the crowd atmosphere can hype you up), walk if you need to (there will be people running and walking in intervals to get to the finish line), and most importantly have fun! Good luck!
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,619 Member
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    I do 20-30 min of yoga before driving to the park to do my long run. After work runs...I feel warn from the day already.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,689 Member
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    For my first 5k, I got there early and walked part of the course before the start. With more experience, I started doing warm-up jogs for a mile or more before the race plus dynamic stretches.

    For my ordinary runs, I just start out very slowly and increase my pace as I get warmed up. I usually do a walk at the end of my run to cool down, followed by some simple stretches (AT and quads especially).

    For your first race, don't line up near the front. Fast people start out in front and go out hard, slower ones in the back so they don't obstruct other runners. If you need to stop to either walk or drink, don't stop suddenly. Move to the side and let anyone close behind you know you are going to stop or slow down. (A friend of mine got badly injured when she tripped over a runner who stopped suddenly to tie her shoe.) Don't wear the race t-shirt, that marks you as a newbie. If you're running with a friend, don't take up the whole path. Move aside if anyone comes up from behind to pass.

    Have fun.
  • BruinsGal_91
    BruinsGal_91 Posts: 1,400 Member
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    For my first 5k, I got there early and walked part of the course before the start. With more experience, I started doing warm-up jogs for a mile or more before the race plus dynamic stretches.

    For my ordinary runs, I just start out very slowly and increase my pace as I get warmed up. I usually do a walk at the end of my run to cool down, followed by some simple stretches (AT and quads especially).

    For your first race, don't line up near the front. Fast people start out in front and go out hard, slower ones in the back so they don't obstruct other runners. If you need to stop to either walk or drink, don't stop suddenly. Move to the side and let anyone close behind you know you are going to stop or slow down. (A friend of mine got badly injured when she tripped over a runner who stopped suddenly to tie her shoe.) Don't wear the race t-shirt, that marks you as a newbie. If you're running with a friend, don't take up the whole path. Move aside if anyone comes up from behind to pass.

    Have fun.

    Poor lass. Hope she's fully recovered. The same thing nearly happened to me recently. A young kid just stopped without warning right in front of me. Luckily I was able to leapfrog over him because he was only small. And he got a telling off from his mum.

    In fact in my race at the weekend, my shoelace was loose, and I was a good girl and pulled over to the sidewalk to re-tie them. My main concern was whether the delay meant I'd blown my chance of a PB, but I manged to improve by four seconds.

    As for warm-ups; If it's a training run from home, I start slowly and and increase my pace, then walk at the end and do a bit of stretching. For races I either walk to the start line (I'm lucky in that I have some fab local races where I don't need to drive). Or if I do take the car, I will park about 0.75m away and slowly jog to the start.

    Hope everyone enjoys their Turkey Trots tomorrow!