Milk question

rosebette
rosebette Posts: 1,657 Member
edited December 2016 in Food and Nutrition
So I was talking to a friend who looked really fit and toned, and she said when she's a few lbs. over, she gives up all dairy. She also told me that if I have dairy, I should drink whole milk, not skim or lowfat because it's more satisfying. She also said lowfat and skim have added sugar so that it will have an acceptable taste, so to avoid it because of the sugar content. However, I've looked at the labels of lowfat milk I have at home (which is not a major brand, I admit), and there are no added ingredients, except Vitamin D. Do major manufacturers, like Hood or Garelick Farms, add sugar to lowfat or skim milk or is this an "urban legend"? If sugar was added, wouldn't the calories be close to the same as whole because sugar has calories?

Replies

  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    Sounds like 'bro science'* to me. No reason to avoid whole milk just as there is no reason to avoid low fat milk. Its just milk. If it fits in your calorie allotment for the day, drink it. Also, no reason to avoid sugar (even if it was added). Same reason.

    *bro science - myths learned and propagated at the gym that make little or no sense but are believed by the lifters there.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,473 Member
    rosebette wrote: »
    So I was talking to a friend who looked really fit and toned, and she said when she's a few lbs. over, she gives up all dairy. She also told me that if I have dairy, I should drink whole milk, not skim or lowfat because it's more satisfying. She also said lowfat and skim have added sugar so that it will have an acceptable taste, so to avoid it because of the sugar content. However, I've looked at the labels of lowfat milk I have at home (which is not a major brand, I admit), and there are no added ingredients, except Vitamin D. Do major manufacturers, like Hood or Garelick Farms, add sugar to lowfat or skim milk or is this an "urban legend"? If sugar was added, wouldn't the calories be close to the same as whole because sugar has calories?

    urban legend
    No, sugar is not added. The sugar (lactose) number is higher in skim and partially skim because the fat has been reduced so percentage wise it makes up more of the total volume, however, it is all the same stuff that is in full fat milk. Drink which ever one you want and like that you can fit in your calorie goal

    It is a tiny, tiny difference in the amount of sugar. Like 2 centigrams per 100 grams of milk, or 15 centigrams per cup, according to the USDA nutrient database. So, you'd have to be drinking nearly a gallon of milk a day to get an extra gram of sugar from drinking skim milk instead of whole milk.

    So, OP, you should make your decision based on what you find satiating, not what your friend finds satiating; based on what you can fit in your calorie goal; and based on how the extra fat in whole milk fits in your overall macro goals, if you track your macros.
  • thelovelyLIZ
    thelovelyLIZ Posts: 1,227 Member
    I don't know about the added sugar thing. When I drank milk I tended to prefer 2% or whole though. Of course, I switched to almond during my first bout of weight loss because the calories are lower (and I don't really care for milk anyway) and lo and behold I have a dairy sensitivity. I'm not 100% dairy free- I still have cheese and ice cream on occasion, as well as whey protein. But moving away from dairy has been a good call for me.
  • MissusMoon
    MissusMoon Posts: 1,900 Member
    No sugar is added to plain milk products.

    Have it or don't have it. Consider the calories and the impact those have. Let those who view food products as religion have their religion, but you don't have to make it your own.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    I know a guy who is an amazing guitar player but knows hardly anything about musical equipment.
    You know someone who is in great shape but knows hardly anything about nutrition.

    There is no added sugar in milk. Cutting dairy (or sugar or grains or anything else) can be a way to reduce calories but is absolutely not necessary because it's the energy balance (calories in vs calories out) which will determine weight loss.
    As far as whole milk being more filling, this is different for everyone. I feel just as full drinking 2% as I do while milk.
  • renae161
    renae161 Posts: 334 Member
    rosebette wrote: »
    So I was talking to a friend who looked really fit and toned, and she said when she's a few lbs. over, she gives up all dairy. She also told me that if I have dairy, I should drink whole milk, not skim or lowfat because it's more satisfying. She also said lowfat and skim have added sugar so that it will have an acceptable taste, so to avoid it because of the sugar content. However, I've looked at the labels of lowfat milk I have at home (which is not a major brand, I admit), and there are no added ingredients, except Vitamin D. Do major manufacturers, like Hood or Garelick Farms, add sugar to lowfat or skim milk or is this an "urban legend"? If sugar was added, wouldn't the calories be close to the same as whole because sugar has calories?

    In my personal opinion, I don't think it is wise for a person to suggest giving up all dairy or dairy substitutes just for the sake of a scale saying you're a few pounds over weight. It could've been that the person needs to work on their portion control or that they need to exercise more. Or, it could also just be water retention or bloating if your friend notices a fluctuate in their weight. I would honestly seek out a good nutritionist who can help you get on the right track because just cause cutting out dairy worked for your friend does not mean it will work for you, you know? Also, if you have any questions about the food, milk, or drinks you're consuming there usually is a 1-800 number on the product below the nutrition facts you can call to ask questions about the product.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,056 Member
    I asked the lady in my supplement store who is also a fitness competitor about avoiding dairy before shows, and her reasoning was estrogen in milk causes water weight which will leave a thin layer of bloat/water over the muscles. She went into more detail, 30 minutes worth in fact! But that was the general gist. She also avoids fruit, but i'll save asking her why she omits that in my next visit there, when i have like a spare 1 hour :open_mouth: .
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,082 Member
    edited December 2016
    rosebette wrote: »
    So I was talking to a friend who looked really fit and toned, and she said when she's a few lbs. over, she gives up all dairy. She also told me that if I have dairy, I should drink whole milk, not skim or lowfat because it's more satisfying. She also said lowfat and skim have added sugar so that it will have an acceptable taste, so to avoid it because of the sugar content. However, I've looked at the labels of lowfat milk I have at home (which is not a major brand, I admit), and there are no added ingredients, except Vitamin D. Do major manufacturers, like Hood or Garelick Farms, add sugar to lowfat or skim milk or is this an "urban legend"? If sugar was added, wouldn't the calories be close to the same as whole because sugar has calories?

    There is no added sugar in skim or lowfat milk...it's lactose and there is slightly (pretty irrelevant) more lactose in lower fat milks because of the way it's processed...to make skim milk and lower fat milk requires more milk because the cream/fat has to be removed...so to get the same volume requires more product and thus more lactose.

    As far as cutting dairy to drop weight...it has nothing to do with the actual dairy...your friend is simply cutting calories by removing dairy...when I need to cut I just stop drinking beer during the week.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,357 Member
    edited December 2016
    I asked the lady in my supplement store who is also a fitness competitor about avoiding dairy before shows, and her reasoning was estrogen in milk causes water weight which will leave a thin layer of bloat/water over the muscles. She went into more detail, 30 minutes worth in fact! But that was the general gist. She also avoids fruit, but i'll save asking her why she omits that in my next visit there, when i have like a spare 1 hour :open_mouth: .

    The diet modifications that physique competitors make in pre-contest preparation aren't applicable to everyday dieting. Most of them are completely irrelevant to average people with average (or above) bodyfat percentages too.

    To the OP - you're correct, there is no sugar added to skim/low-fat milk. Milk already has a certain sugar content due to the lactose ("milk sugar") inherent in the milk itself.

    As far as giving up dairy, it may work for her because it cuts her calorie intake by not drinking it, or maybe she has a slight lactose intolerance/sensitivity and giving up the dairy reduces some bloat. Either way, there are a lot of fit/"toned" people who have taken different dietary paths to get their results, and there are plenty who include milk/dairy products as part of their daily diets (just as there are many who choose to exclude it). There's no one size fits all answer.
  • Christine_72
    Christine_72 Posts: 16,056 Member
    edited December 2016
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    I asked the lady in my supplement store who is also a fitness competitor about avoiding dairy before shows, and her reasoning was estrogen in milk causes water weight which will leave a thin layer of bloat/water over the muscles. She went into more detail, 30 minutes worth in fact! But that was the general gist. She also avoids fruit, but i'll save asking her why she omits that in my next visit there, when i have like a spare 1 hour :open_mouth: .

    The diet modifications that physique competitors make in pre-contest preparation aren't applicable to everyday dieting. Most of them are completely irrelevant to average people with average (or above) bodyfat percentages too.

    To the OP - you're correct, there is no sugar added to skim/low-fat milk. Milk already has a certain sugar content due to the lactose ("milk sugar") inherent in the milk itself.

    As far as giving up dairy, it may work for her because it cuts her calorie intake by not drinking it, or maybe she has a slight lactose intolerance/sensitivity and giving up the dairy reduces some bloat. Either way, there are a lot of fit/"toned" people who have taken different dietary paths to get their results, and there are plenty who include milk/dairy products as part of their daily diets (just as there are many who choose to exclude it). There's no one size fits all answer.

    But does what she said about milk make sense? Even Almond milk is off the table, and definitely NO fruit.

    I dont know if her claims have any validity or it is all just bro science..
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,357 Member
    edited December 2016
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    I asked the lady in my supplement store who is also a fitness competitor about avoiding dairy before shows, and her reasoning was estrogen in milk causes water weight which will leave a thin layer of bloat/water over the muscles. She went into more detail, 30 minutes worth in fact! But that was the general gist. She also avoids fruit, but i'll save asking her why she omits that in my next visit there, when i have like a spare 1 hour :open_mouth: .

    The diet modifications that physique competitors make in pre-contest preparation aren't applicable to everyday dieting. Most of them are completely irrelevant to average people with average (or above) bodyfat percentages too.

    To the OP - you're correct, there is no sugar added to skim/low-fat milk. Milk already has a certain sugar content due to the lactose ("milk sugar") inherent in the milk itself.

    As far as giving up dairy, it may work for her because it cuts her calorie intake by not drinking it, or maybe she has a slight lactose intolerance/sensitivity and giving up the dairy reduces some bloat. Either way, there are a lot of fit/"toned" people who have taken different dietary paths to get their results, and there are plenty who include milk/dairy products as part of their daily diets (just as there are many who choose to exclude it). There's no one size fits all answer.

    But does what she said about milk make sense? Even Almond milk is off the table, and definitely NO fruit.

    I dont know if her claims have any validity or it is all just bro science..

    The only milk I've ever heard of that posed estrogen issues is soy milk (because of the phytoestrogens), and even the research on that is inconclusive and all over the place in terms of opinions. I don't see how there could be estrogen in almond milk, since it's nothing but almonds and water. I've never heard of there being an estrogen issue with dairy milk, and this study seems to show that there's no such issue.

    The fruit thing is most likely because physique competitors strongly cut carbs during contest prep to minimize water retention. They do a lot of different things to manipulate their water levels, wanting to come into stage condition as "dry" as possible (until a carb load immediately before the contest, to maximize glycogen/water in the muscles for fullness).
  • crzycatlady1
    crzycatlady1 Posts: 1,930 Member
    Unless you're friend is referring to chocolate milk, then no she's wrong. She's losing weight when she cuts out dairy because she's cutting out calories. Nothing magical about dairy in itself though :)
  • rosebette
    rosebette Posts: 1,657 Member
    Thanks for all the responses. She actually drinks a lot more milk than I do -- a cup or more a day, not just a splash in coffee, so cutting it would make a big calorie difference for her. She might have other reasons for cutting -- as she is really cut and toned, so she's aiming for a certain physique. She's pretty strict. She says she uses MFP and nets 1100 to keep her shape (she does eat back exercise calories). Meanwhile, I'm still recovering from 4 lbs. of post Thanksgiving weight.