something for good fiday that isn't fish

hi,
never having made a frittata, i'm thinking of giving it a go.
been googeling for some healthy ideas, but can't seem to find anything that tickles my fancy.
perhaps using ingredients i already have like frozen broccoli or spinich, roast red peppers, fresh tomatoes, cottage/cream cheese, parmasan cheese, and the ususal pantry staples.
any thoughts???
all ideas are welcome
thanks.

Replies

  • L1zardQueen
    L1zardQueen Posts: 8,754 Member
    Ah, the beauty of trying new recipes! Just do it.
    I'm forever trying a new recipe and building on what i have learned. Sometimes recipes are a total fail. Failure is good.
  • SuzySunshine99
    SuzySunshine99 Posts: 2,977 Member
    How about a veggie stir fry or a pasta primavera? Both are good for using up all kinds of leftover random stuff. Vegetarian chili as well...I throw whatever I have in the fridge in there.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,752 Member
    My frittata is generally a "kitchen sink" recipe... Anything and everything goes in, to use up whatever odds and ends are in the fridge. Pieces of roast sweet potato are good though! And mushrooms and onion.

  • Lizzy622
    Lizzy622 Posts: 3,705 Member
    Frittatas are actually quicker and easier than I imagined. You should go for it but make sure you have an oven safe frying pan. I also like a vegetable stir fry and you can use cauliflower "rice" to cut calories even more. My daughter and I are actually going vegan this week. Tofu stir fry for lunch today. Yesterday's dinner was a vegan black bean burrito.
  • AngryViking1970
    AngryViking1970 Posts: 2,847 Member
    Honestly, I would throw in all those things you mentioned. Frittata is so flexible.
  • Mary_Anastasia
    Mary_Anastasia Posts: 267 Member
    Crust of bread and water.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,401 Member
    Lobster? Crab? Shrimp? Is it just seafood that you don't want?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • mom23mangos
    mom23mangos Posts: 3,070 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Lobster? Crab? Shrimp? Is it just seafood that you don't want?

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Around here, crawfish boils are big good Friday.
  • Jruzer
    Jruzer Posts: 3,501 Member
    There are elaborate fish fries here in the Upper Midwest all through Lent.

    Including on Good Friday, which seems . . . inappropriate to me. It's not really penitential.

    We usually have buttered noodles.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Jruzer wrote: »
    There are elaborate fish fries here in the Upper Midwest all through Lent.

    Including on Good Friday, which seems . . . inappropriate to me. It's not really penitential.

    We usually have buttered noodles.

    I've never seen a church-based fish fry on Good Friday (I'm in Chicago, obviously could be different elsewhere). Would be contrary to the idea of fasting, even if the fasting rules (for Catholics) don't require a complete fast. True that pubs and restaurants will do them on Fridays through Good Friday here, however.

    If I don't fast completely I usually just have some roasted veg or something simple like oatmeal. Omelet would be good, though. Don't remember what we had when I was a kid -- probably fish.
  • fitoverfortymom
    fitoverfortymom Posts: 3,452 Member
    Macaroni and cheese.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,943 Member
    Lentil soup.
    Vegetarian chili.
    Grilled cheese and tomato soup.
    Scrambled eggs or omelet (with cheese if you like).
    Salad and cottage cheese.
    Peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
  • laur357
    laur357 Posts: 896 Member
    I love fritattas. You can add potatoes or chickpeas to give it more bulk and stay meat-free.

    Artichoke hearts, spinach, sun dried tomatoes, hot pepper flakes, and Parmesan or feta
    Broccoli, potato, and cheddar
    Mushrooms, leeks, chickpeas, goat cheese
    Your whole pantry list sounds pretty good too!

    You could also make bean salads, poblano peppers stuffed with beans, rice, and cheese, minestrone soup, cheese ravioli or gnocchi with spring veggies and egg, grilled cheese and tomato soup, veggie/bean enchiladas.
  • fitoverfortymom
    fitoverfortymom Posts: 3,452 Member
    I second the lentil soup. I LOVE lentil soup! Lentil soup with a grilled cheese sandwich would be great.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    edited April 2017
    Is there a thing about not eating meat on Good Friday? Are there any other restrictions?

    There are countless websites, blogs, books, and youtube channels full of amazing vegetarian meals--the world is your pleurotus ostreatus!

  • Jruzer
    Jruzer Posts: 3,501 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Jruzer wrote: »
    There are elaborate fish fries here in the Upper Midwest all through Lent.

    Including on Good Friday, which seems . . . inappropriate to me. It's not really penitential.

    We usually have buttered noodles.

    I've never seen a church-based fish fry on Good Friday (I'm in Chicago, obviously could be different elsewhere). Would be contrary to the idea of fasting, even if the fasting rules (for Catholics) don't require a complete fast. True that pubs and restaurants will do them on Fridays through Good Friday here, however.

    If I don't fast completely I usually just have some roasted veg or something simple like oatmeal. Omelet would be good, though. Don't remember what we had when I was a kid -- probably fish.

    By us it's usually the Knights of Columbus who sponsor them. So not technically church-baaed, but definitely a Catholic organization. They are always fundraisers for various organizations: youth mission trip, bowling team, etc.

    To clarify, I think it's possible to make this fit in under the precepts of the Good Friday fast. I personally just don't feel that it's in the spirit of the occasion.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited April 2017
    Jruzer wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Jruzer wrote: »
    There are elaborate fish fries here in the Upper Midwest all through Lent.

    Including on Good Friday, which seems . . . inappropriate to me. It's not really penitential.

    We usually have buttered noodles.

    I've never seen a church-based fish fry on Good Friday (I'm in Chicago, obviously could be different elsewhere). Would be contrary to the idea of fasting, even if the fasting rules (for Catholics) don't require a complete fast. True that pubs and restaurants will do them on Fridays through Good Friday here, however.

    If I don't fast completely I usually just have some roasted veg or something simple like oatmeal. Omelet would be good, though. Don't remember what we had when I was a kid -- probably fish.

    By us it's usually the Knights of Columbus who sponsor them. So not technically church-baaed, but definitely a Catholic organization. They are always fundraisers for various organizations: youth mission trip, bowling team, etc.

    To clarify, I think it's possible to make this fit in under the precepts of the Good Friday fast. I personally just don't feel that it's in the spirit of the occasion.

    We have those too (also KoC sponsored sometimes), through most of Lent, but not on Good Friday. I can't see my church going for it. (They scheduled one on St. Patrick's Day this year, when the archdiocese said meat was okay, which wasn't great planning, although they had Irish themed stuff so I assume it was intentional!)

    I suppose Wisconsinites will use any excuse to party, though!
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited April 2017
    Is there a thing about not eating meat on Good Friday? Are there any other restrictions?

    Depends on the religion.

    Current US Catholic rules are that it's a fast day (not for kids or people who have medical reasons not to limit food). That means (because we are loosey-goosey about what a fast is these days) ;-), no meat (but fish is okay, even though it's meat, because Latin), one regular sized meal only, and up to two smaller meals that should be less than one full meal together.

    Lots of people do more of a fast, though. I either do a full fast or eat one vegetarian meal for dinner.