Bodyfat Percentage

Hey guys. Idk if I'm posting this in the right spot. Do any of you know if 27 percent body fat is high for a chick that is 5 foot 3 and 113 pounds? How does that even happen?

Replies

  • deetucker70
    deetucker70 Posts: 43 Member
    How did you have it tested?
  • richardgavel
    richardgavel Posts: 1,000 Member
    Gimsteinn1 wrote: »
    I think it's in the average... How was it tested?

    When you say average, do you mean among the current population (not good) or healthy (good)?

    As to the OP, it can happen easily. In my case, I lost 60 lbs very quickly and did not resistance training during that timeframe. Both contributed to losing a good deal of muscle along with the fat. Now I'm having to​ slowly build the muscle back up.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    While it is average, it is surprising for someone as light as the OP.

    I'd also like to know how it was measured and if OP has ever strength trained and if they have lost a significant amount of weight at all.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,488 Member
    Likely an error in the reading. If it's correct, then you are really lacking in lean muscle. Most likely in the legs for many females I've seen in the 100's who are your height or taller.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • Well, it was measured by this machine thing at Snap fitness when they told me my body age as well. But when I use the math equation from online it says 24 %, I think. So, idk. It is possible that it is correct, though, bc I used to be more muscular for sure. So, maybe. I just want to know if it was accurate.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,852 Member
    Well, it was measured by this machine thing at Snap fitness when they told me my body age as well. But when I use the math equation from online it says 24 %, I think. So, idk. It is possible that it is correct, though, bc I used to be more muscular for sure. So, maybe. I just want to know if it was accurate.

    Assuming the "machine thing" was a BIA device (sends a very small electrical current through your body, or part of your body) then they vary from ludicrous as worst to maybe give you a somewhat believable trend if used frequently but with some huge individual variations day to day.

    Don't give any great significance to a one time number. Hydration levels can swing the already vague results dramatically.

    The sample pictures here are probably a better guide http://www.builtlean.com/2012/09/24/body-fat-percentage-men-women/
  • 883xlsportster
    883xlsportster Posts: 221 Member
    For reference on measuring myself. My handheld BIA says 26%. My BIA scale reads 21% and skin callipers read 15%.
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,473 Member
    I had a Dexa scan - one of the most accurate methods of measuring BF%. For comparison, I used my Omron scale before leaving to get that done. Scale with bio-electric impedance said 16.1%. Dexa said 15.8 %. Some bio-electrical impedance devices may be way off, but I'm happy with how close mine is.
  • Randalicious91
    Randalicious91 Posts: 37 Member
    I have 9% body fat. Its really hard to gain muscle tbh but I am a soccer player so makes sense
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,473 Member
    What Omron scale is that btw?

    Omron HBF-516
  • nrbutton
    nrbutton Posts: 165 Member
    I'm 5'3" and 22% body fat at 130 lbs with a medium body frame and slightly muscular. I would think 113 would be around 20-22% body fat even if you had a small frame and not much muscle but no way does 27% sound right. That's my body fat percentage when I joined the army at 154 lbs
  • bbell1985
    bbell1985 Posts: 4,582 Member
    edited April 2017
    It's high. But those machines aren't accurate.
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,069 Member
    1) For general population 27% for a female is quite likely considered healthy although to my knowledge I'm not sure if there's ever been any official standards that use body-fat %.

    2) All methods of body fat analysis have a high degree of error associated with them, some more than others.

    http://weightology.net/weightologyweekly/index.php/free-content/free-content/volume-1-issue-3-the-pitfalls-of-body-fat-measurement-parts-1-and-2/the-pitfalls-of-body-fat-measurement-part-1/
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,473 Member
    The American Council on Exercise made a chart that is referenced quite a bit. WebMD references it here: http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/body-fat-measurement#2
  • ChristopherLimoges
    ChristopherLimoges Posts: 298 Member
    edited April 2017
    I believe you have to set a profile of your current self before judging your body fat and mass, average, athletic, etc. Seems like you're using a profile more towards the average or lesser type of body. There are also other factors that can effect the reading of these calculations. Try to use a profile that's the most accurate representation of your current self and life.
  • Thank you all for your insight and useful information