weighing chicken breast? Raw or cooked?

nab212
nab212 Posts: 42 Member
I've read different schools of thought. Which do you ladies and gents do?
Thanks
AJ

Replies

  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
    Always raw
  • nab212
    nab212 Posts: 42 Member
    That's what I've always done. I prepped some for today and decided to check it after. It was roughly 4oz less after boiled.
  • T0M_K
    T0M_K Posts: 7,526 Member
    a good friend told me to also try to use the USDA entries in the database. have to be careful what entries you use unfortunately.
  • nab212
    nab212 Posts: 42 Member
    Thanks. I'll look into that.
  • Diem78
    Diem78 Posts: 1,720 Member
    I weigh chicken raw unless it's the pre-cooked chicken breast strips.
  • Beka3695
    Beka3695 Posts: 4,134 Member
    The database will say raw or grilled.

    If in doubt - go raw
  • heiliskrimsli
    heiliskrimsli Posts: 735 Member
    I weigh everything raw. If I am making something that is multiple portions, I weigh it raw to prepare it, weigh it cooked and divide by the number of portions, then I write the grams on a piece of tape and stick it on the container.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    You can weigh raw or cooked so long as you pick the right entry (package information if weighing raw and you have it, use the USDA otherwise) and the cooking method. I would do raw for boneless, skinless chicken breast, normally, since you can weigh it before you cook it. I mostly eat bone-in chicken, and so weight it cooked, using the cooked entry.
  • nab212
    nab212 Posts: 42 Member
    Thanks for the info.
  • PowerliftingMom
    PowerliftingMom Posts: 430 Member
    I only eat boneless chicken breasts and always weigh them AFTER cooking. My original diet was set up that way
  • bunnyluv19
    bunnyluv19 Posts: 103 Member
    I always weigh boneless,skinless chicken breast cooked and log it as 35 calories an ounce.I hope that's right.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    bunnyluv19 wrote: »
    I always weigh boneless,skinless chicken breast cooked and log it as 35 calories an ounce.I hope that's right.

    It depends on how it's cooked, but for dry heat (sauteed, broiled, roasted) I have 46 calories per oz cooked.

    35/oz is the raw weight, I think. It shrinks (due to less water) when you cook it, which is why it is so important to match raw/cooked and the entry you use.

    Luckily it's pretty low cal, so for 4 oz we are only talking a difference of about 44 calories total, but it adds up.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    I go raw weight for meat/vegies, or dry weight for grains/pasta ...I think it's more accurate.
  • JoJosAnatomymfp
    JoJosAnatomymfp Posts: 178 Member
    Raw for everything
  • dutchandkiwi
    dutchandkiwi Posts: 1,389 Member
    raw!
  • nab212
    nab212 Posts: 42 Member
    That's what I've always done. I may be over boiling.
  • Enjcg5
    Enjcg5 Posts: 389 Member
    edited May 2017
    But what do you do when you cook more than you plan on eating? Like what if Im putting a bunch of chicken in the crockpot?
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    Enjcg5 wrote: »
    But what do you do when you cook more than you plan on eating? Like what if Im putting a bunch of chicken in the crockpot?

    We weigh out enough raw chicken for X portions. Cook it, weigh again and divide by X to get the weight of cooked chicken per portion.
  • Queenmunchy
    Queenmunchy Posts: 3,380 Member
    edited May 2017
    Enjcg5 wrote: »
    But what do you do when you cook more than you plan on eating? Like what if Im putting a bunch of chicken in the crockpot?

    Enter all of your raw ingredients in the recipe builder. Cook your meal and weigh the total finished meal, subtracting the weight of the pot. Set that number as the amount of 1g or 100g servings.
    When you eat it, you can weigh and log what you're eating. 250g would be 250 1g servings OR 2.5 100g servings. It helps with variable serving sizes, like if everyone in your family eats a different amount and it's not portioned out into 6 or 8 equal portions.