bariatric surgery

How does anyone feel about bariatric surgery? I have always thought it would be my only option. My weight fluctuates ao much. I am petrified of surgery because of im a mom of 4. I have recently been doing research on balloon weight loss. It seems so safe, easy, affordable. Has anyone here had it? if you dont know what im talking about you can see the balloon procedure here: http://balloonweightloss.com/ Is this just the easy way out? I would really like feed back.
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Replies

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,889 Member
    How many pounds do you have to lose?

    You might find the WLS convo starting with this post helpful: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/39777849/#Comment_39777849
  • vivelajackie
    vivelajackie Posts: 321 Member
    edited June 2017
    I think many people are turning to surgery because it seems like the only option for them, and honestly I'm not going to judge their choices. My friend in nursing personally forbade me from it because there are some risks. So... I turned to counting calories and discovered that's free and I can eat and drink at the same time, which is pretty cool. It's all up to you, but either way, best of luck.
  • Bekah7482
    Bekah7482 Posts: 247 Member
    What you will find is that most people who have not had the surgery have a lot of opinions on it but very little knowledge of the surgery. There are so many benefits to the surgery and it is by no means easy BUT it is only a tool so you have to be committed to making the appropriate changes.

    I would suggest you talk to your doctor about getting a referral to your bariatrics department. Attend their orientation and meet with a surgeon or go to their support group. That does not mean you are committed to having the surgery but will let you know what the process is, how the surgery works and allow you to talk to people who have had the surgery. You will get far more and accurate information that way than you will from the general public.

    You can also message me if you have any questions.
  • inertiastrength
    inertiastrength Posts: 2,343 Member
    edited June 2017
    I don't feel it's an easy way out, same as I do about steroids. You still need to put in work. There are a lot of morbidly obese post-WLS folks, as there are steroid abusers with brutal physiques. It's a tool.
  • CPFitnessIsFun
    CPFitnessIsFun Posts: 33 Member
    It definitely changed my life and helped me but the struggle with weight is still the same. You need to be honest with yourself your diet and your exercise routine. In a way I have found it harder after surgery because I'm even more critical of people's opinions of me especially since I gained back some weight (lost 150 lbs gained back 50lbs). All I can say is no matter what start exercising and eating healthy now; regardless if you decide to do surgery. You want a change, you are ready for the change start making it! Create some mini goals drink 64 oz of water for 2 weeks, then add something else like exercise for 2 days a week.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
    I had the bypass and the entire process including the lifestyle change has transformed my life. The head surgeon that supervised my program is not a fan of the lap band or the balloon. These surgeries are NOT proven and are based on a false premise.

    (The false premise is that the obese got that way by consuming large volumes of food at a sitting)

    My (proven) surgery is thought to work by reducing/impairing absorption. It also changes the production of ghrelin and "turns off" insulin resistance.

    Whichever way you decide to go, OP, I'm roooting for you.
  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,298 Member
    Weight loss surgery isn't an easy way out - the surgery and aftereffects are a *kitten*, but there is no doubt that some that get it think that it will be easier than alternative methods, that it will enforce what they should be doing. And it does, to a degree, but not perfectly and not forever. Those people are the ones that fail, unless they have an attitude change.

    I know four people who've had it done, varying procedures, and all four were unpleasantly shocked by the negative effects. Makes me wonder if the negative effects were downplayed during the medical consult, or if they just refused to hear things they didn't want to hear. I really hope it was the second.

    One nearly died from complications and malnutrition. He lost weight while sick and then gained it all back and didn't lose any more. The other three lost varying degrees of weight. Only one made it out of obesity, and all four gained it all back again because they used the surgery like a permanent crutch and weren't learning to do it on their own.

    The one that made it out of obesity once (and is a former athlete) finally realized he needed to take control of his diet and activity and that the surgery was not going to make him do it. He got back to his habits when he was an athlete and lost the weight again. He's at an ideal weight now, and looks to be close to his former athletic physique.

    What bothers me about WLS is that for most people, I think it is a temporary fix and I think that it is often used unnecessarily. I think few manage to make the permanent changes after surgery that are needed to be successful long term, and I don't see a benefit of putting people through it unless they are in a situation where they need to lose weight immediately (not the case for any of the four I described).
  • Bekah7482
    Bekah7482 Posts: 247 Member
    I just had VSG I'll be a week out tomorrow. I can't speak for the ballon option seeing as I went for something permanent. But I must say as of right now. I regret it every single day. I wish I had went with something that could have been reversed or even better nothing at all! At times I feel like this is one of the worse decisions I've ever made and now I have to live with it forever. That being said I could change my mind and a few months out be so thankful I had it. But if I knew someone who was going to even consider weight loss surgery I would suggest something that can be reversed.

    You are only a week out, you will not regret long term. I promise that it gets better. Give it a couple of weeks.
  • Soundwave79
    Soundwave79 Posts: 469 Member
    I just had VSG I'll be a week out tomorrow. I can't speak for the ballon option seeing as I went for something permanent. But I must say as of right now. I regret it every single day. I wish I had went with something that could have been reversed or even better nothing at all! At times I feel like this is one of the worse decisions I've ever made and now I have to live with it forever. That being said I could change my mind and a few months out be so thankful I had it. But if I knew someone who was going to even consider weight loss surgery I would suggest something that can be reversed.

    I have a loved one that is strongly considering the VSG. If you don't mind... could you share some more in depth reasoning as to why you feel like it was a mistake for you? If it's too personal I understand.

  • firef1y72
    firef1y72 Posts: 1,579 Member
    [quote="Bekah7482;c-39822774"

    Because if weight loss was as easy as "just stick to the diet," we wouldn't have overweight people. The pre-surgery diet is a very specific set of guidelines for not only what foods to eat but how you eat those foods. You need to change these habits before surgery because you can literally hurt yourself if you do not follow the new eating guidelines after surgery. The general population seem to think that WLS patients have surgery then sit on their *kitten* and watch the weight drop. They still have to diet and exercise for the rest of their life just like everyone else. Surgery is just a tool, if not used right, you will not lose the weight or gain it all right back.

    As far as complications, the complication rate of surgery is very low. It has become a pretty routine surgery and is relatively safe. The side effects are generally short term throughout the healing process; nausea, dizziness, food getting "stuck," constipation, etc. Most of the issues that are dangerous have to do with a patient who does not follow the post surgery rules (again why the pre-surgery diet is so important). If you do not eat right, get in your water and protein, take your vitamins, etc are far more dangerous than the actual surgery.

    Also with surgery, most of the time you are required to take 6 months of nutrition courses, meet with dietitians and therapist and go to support groups to work on your relationship with food. There is far more to WLS then get the surgery and lose weight.[/quote]

    Sorry but weight loss really is as simple as "just stick to the diet", whether you have WLS or not. As I said, I was told there was no way I'd be able to lose the weight without surgery, but by sticking to the diet, and moving more I have. If the same resources and effort were put in to helping these people continue with the pre-surgery weightloss who's to say they wouldn't also be able to shed the weight without resorting to surgery. It seems to me that the possibly life long rules after surgery are just over restrictive, I enjoy the occasional "naughty" meal where I blow out and that hasn't stopped me losing the weight.