Vegan

Hi all does anyone here follow a plant based diet? Was wondering what my daily calories should be? I've been told to avoid high fat content foods and processed foods like vegan cheese etc. I'm 5'10 and roughly about 16 stone need to lose around 3-4 stone as my weight is effecting my health now. Any advice would be greatly appreciated

Replies

  • JaydedMiss
    JaydedMiss Posts: 4,286 Member
    being vegan isnt going to make you lose weight, but if its an ethical thing carry on. Doesnt sound like it though
  • Old_Cat_Lady
    Old_Cat_Lady Posts: 1,193 Member
    edited June 2017
    You can eat grilled chicken and salmon at home and lose weight. Who told you to go vegan? An internet video? Netflix show?
  • jmaggybreen
    jmaggybreen Posts: 3 Member
    Nobody told me to vegan I've been vegan for a while it's an ethical choice I'm here because I want to lose weight not using me being vegan as a way to lose weight.
  • Old_Cat_Lady
    Old_Cat_Lady Posts: 1,193 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.
  • jmaggybreen
    jmaggybreen Posts: 3 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Thank you. It's given me just over 2000 calories
  • geltner2
    geltner2 Posts: 24 Member
    Try to only include healthful vegan foods like fruits, vegetables , legumes, nuts, whole grains. There are wonderful vegan recipes and you can experiment. I make homemade granola which makes a scrumptious breakfast with non-dairy milk and fruit. 100% whole wheat bread makes great sandwiches. And you have lots of calories to work with. I'm eating 1300 but exercise adds some calories which helps greatly .
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.
  • RedheadedPrincess14
    RedheadedPrincess14 Posts: 415 Member
    A whole food plant based diet cantered around, veg, fruit and grains can definitely make it easier to lose weight because those foods are less calorie dense then Standard American diet foods. Calories still matter but you should find it a lot easier to stay within your calorie goal if you're eating a lot of plants that are more dilute calorically. I am vegan and my diary is open. Feel free to friend
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    A whole food plant based diet cantered around, veg, fruit and grains can definitely make it easier to lose weight because those foods are less calorie dense then Standard American diet foods. Calories still matter but you should find it a lot easier to stay within your calorie goal if you're eating a lot of plants that are more dilute calorically. I am vegan and my diary is open. Feel free to friend

    Grains are pretty calorie-dense though . . .
  • RedheadedPrincess14
    RedheadedPrincess14 Posts: 415 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.

    I agree that the processed foods mentioned in this post (which are mostly minimally processed ) can be an excellent addition to a mostly whole foods diet. If you're not taking b12 and watching your nutrients on cronometer, these foods are very important for b12. You can easily get enough protein with beans, legumes and dark greens but tofu and tempeh are also great protein sources and totally healthy.

    I would t even consider canned beans or tomatoes processed foods. Eat those in abundance! they are a staple for vegans. And yes, condiments are great to make veganism enjoyable and practical. Don't make veganism harder than it needs to be!
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.

    I agree that the processed foods mentioned in this post (which are mostly minimally processed ) can be an excellent addition to a mostly whole foods diet. If you're not taking b12 and watching your nutrients on cronometer, these foods are very important for b12. You can easily get enough protein with beans, legumes and dark greens but tofu and tempeh are also great protein sources and totally healthy.

    I would t even consider canned beans or tomatoes processed foods. Eat those in abundance! they are a staple for vegans. And yes, condiments are great to make veganism enjoyable and practical. Don't make veganism harder than it needs to be!

    Canning is a form of processing. This is one reason why I think it's so ridiculous to tell people to avoid processed foods, it includes all types of foods there is no reason to avoid.

    Why would you consider something like seitan or nutritional yeast to be minimally processed? They both seem processed to me, but I'm not sure what definition you're working from.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,879 Member
    Put your stats and whatnot into MFP...being vegan doesn't alter your a calorie requirements vs a non vegan.
  • RedheadedPrincess14
    RedheadedPrincess14 Posts: 415 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.

    I agree that the processed foods mentioned in this post (which are mostly minimally processed ) can be an excellent addition to a mostly whole foods diet. If you're not taking b12 and watching your nutrients on cronometer, these foods are very important for b12. You can easily get enough protein with beans, legumes and dark greens but tofu and tempeh are also great protein sources and totally healthy.

    I would t even consider canned beans or tomatoes processed foods. Eat those in abundance! they are a staple for vegans. And yes, condiments are great to make veganism enjoyable and practical. Don't make veganism harder than it needs to be!

    Canning is a form of processing. This is one reason why I think it's so ridiculous to tell people to avoid processed foods, it includes all types of foods there is no reason to avoid.

    Why would you consider something like seitan or nutritional yeast to be minimally processed? They both seem processed to me, but I'm not sure what definition you're working from.
    Nutritional yeast and seitan are pretty processed but tempeh and tofu (especially tempeh) are pretty minimally processed. Technically even blending food and cooking and cutting is a form of processing.buti think we need to distinguish the difference between twinkles and tempeh lol. The fact that something's processed doesn't automatically make it bad. I mean, obviously, even homemade oat flour is processed. Some foods are processed with tons of chemicals and others are just a combination of whole foods with some processing
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.

    I agree that the processed foods mentioned in this post (which are mostly minimally processed ) can be an excellent addition to a mostly whole foods diet. If you're not taking b12 and watching your nutrients on cronometer, these foods are very important for b12. You can easily get enough protein with beans, legumes and dark greens but tofu and tempeh are also great protein sources and totally healthy.

    I would t even consider canned beans or tomatoes processed foods. Eat those in abundance! they are a staple for vegans. And yes, condiments are great to make veganism enjoyable and practical. Don't make veganism harder than it needs to be!

    Canning is a form of processing. This is one reason why I think it's so ridiculous to tell people to avoid processed foods, it includes all types of foods there is no reason to avoid.

    Why would you consider something like seitan or nutritional yeast to be minimally processed? They both seem processed to me, but I'm not sure what definition you're working from.
    Nutritional yeast and seitan are pretty processed but tempeh and tofu (especially tempeh) are pretty minimally processed. Technically even blending food and cooking and cutting is a form of processing.buti think we need to distinguish the difference between twinkles and tempeh lol. The fact that something's processed doesn't automatically make it bad. I mean, obviously, even homemade oat flour is processed. Some foods are processed with tons of chemicals and others are just a combination of whole foods with some processing

    Twinkies and tempeh are different foods with completely different macro- and micronutrient levels. We don't need to talk about their processing level in order to distinguish them -- they're already very different.

    Processing -- whether it's with chemicals (which are in all foods, including non-processed ones) seems like a kind of irrelevant factor to me. There are processed foods that are full of nutrition, non-processed foods that have much less. I think learning to understand macro- and micronutrients is a more valuable skill for meeting one's needs on a vegan diet than avoiding foods due to their level of processing (or even how they are processed or what they are processed with). Same with whole foods and non-whole foods. There are some non-whole foods that are great sources of macro- and micronutrients and there's no reason to avoid them just because they aren't whole.
  • RedheadedPrincess14
    RedheadedPrincess14 Posts: 415 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.

    I agree that the processed foods mentioned in this post (which are mostly minimally processed ) can be an excellent addition to a mostly whole foods diet. If you're not taking b12 and watching your nutrients on cronometer, these foods are very important for b12. You can easily get enough protein with beans, legumes and dark greens but tofu and tempeh are also great protein sources and totally healthy.

    I would t even consider canned beans or tomatoes processed foods. Eat those in abundance! they are a staple for vegans. And yes, condiments are great to make veganism enjoyable and practical. Don't make veganism harder than it needs to be!

    Canning is a form of processing. This is one reason why I think it's so ridiculous to tell people to avoid processed foods, it includes all types of foods there is no reason to avoid.

    Why would you consider something like seitan or nutritional yeast to be minimally processed? They both seem processed to me, but I'm not sure what definition you're working from.
    Nutritional yeast and seitan are pretty processed but tempeh and tofu (especially tempeh) are pretty minimally processed. Technically even blending food and cooking and cutting is a form of processing.buti think we need to distinguish the difference between twinkles and tempeh lol. The fact that something's processed doesn't automatically make it bad. I mean, obviously, even homemade oat flour is processed. Some foods are processed with tons of chemicals and others are just a combination of whole foods with some processing

    Twinkies and tempeh are different foods with completely different macro- and micronutrient levels. We don't need to talk about their processing level in order to distinguish them -- they're already very different.

    Processing -- whether it's with chemicals (which are in all foods, including non-processed ones) seems like a kind of irrelevant factor to me. There are processed foods that are full of nutrition, non-processed foods that have much less. I think learning to understand macro- and micronutrients is a more valuable skill for meeting one's needs on a vegan diet than avoiding foods due to their level of processing (or even how they are processed or what they are processed with). Same with whole foods and non-whole foods. There are some non-whole foods that are great sources of macro- and micronutrients and there's no reason to avoid them just because they aren't whole.

    I would agree!
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
    So what you are really asking is What are some healthy vegan foods?
    How about greens, beans, and nuts. Eating lots of produce. Avoiding processed foods as much as possible. Calories per day? What did MFP give you. This site does a very good job at this.

    Avoiding processed foods is unnecessary for health and may even make it harder for a vegan to meet their nutritional needs. Foods like plant milks and nutritional yeast are often fortified with B12 and are convenient ways for vegans to meet the need for this key vitamin. Tofu, tempeh, and seitan are high in protein and good lower calorie options for vegans trying to meet calorie goals. Canned beans and tomatoes are easy to store and prepare and nutrient-rich. Foods like soy sauce, miso, mustard, and hot sauces are great ways to add flavor for vegans who are experimenting with different vegetables and grains. These are just a few examples of things that are pointless to restrict.

    I agree that the processed foods mentioned in this post (which are mostly minimally processed ) can be an excellent addition to a mostly whole foods diet. If you're not taking b12 and watching your nutrients on cronometer, these foods are very important for b12. You can easily get enough protein with beans, legumes and dark greens but tofu and tempeh are also great protein sources and totally healthy.

    I would t even consider canned beans or tomatoes processed foods. Eat those in abundance! they are a staple for vegans. And yes, condiments are great to make veganism enjoyable and practical. Don't make veganism harder than it needs to be!

    Canning is a form of processing. This is one reason why I think it's so ridiculous to tell people to avoid processed foods, it includes all types of foods there is no reason to avoid.

    Why would you consider something like seitan or nutritional yeast to be minimally processed? They both seem processed to me, but I'm not sure what definition you're working from.
    Nutritional yeast and seitan are pretty processed but tempeh and tofu (especially tempeh) are pretty minimally processed. Technically even blending food and cooking and cutting is a form of processing.buti think we need to distinguish the difference between twinkles and tempeh lol. The fact that something's processed doesn't automatically make it bad. I mean, obviously, even homemade oat flour is processed. Some foods are processed with tons of chemicals and others are just a combination of whole foods with some processing

    Twinkies and tempeh are different foods with completely different macro- and micronutrient levels. We don't need to talk about their processing level in order to distinguish them -- they're already very different.

    Processing -- whether it's with chemicals (which are in all foods, including non-processed ones) seems like a kind of irrelevant factor to me. There are processed foods that are full of nutrition, non-processed foods that have much less. I think learning to understand macro- and micronutrients is a more valuable skill for meeting one's needs on a vegan diet than avoiding foods due to their level of processing (or even how they are processed or what they are processed with). Same with whole foods and non-whole foods. There are some non-whole foods that are great sources of macro- and micronutrients and there's no reason to avoid them just because they aren't whole.

    I would agree!

    :)
  • Muana1005
    Muana1005 Posts: 172 Member
    Pretty much most Indian (Gujarati, Punjabi) dry snacks are vegan & gluten free if you need to add calories.