Shin splits

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I think I'm developing shin splits now that I'm running on the days I don't do boxing. My shins burn at night when I lay down and are getting progressively more painful this week.

Does anyone have any advice on how to heal quickly and avoid this pain from returning?

I love my workouts so quitting isn't an option

Replies

  • ROBOTFOOD
    ROBOTFOOD Posts: 5,527 Member
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    Well you are going to want to take a break from running before those shin splints progress into stress reactions and then fractures requiring months off. Why not swim or bike for a week or two?
  • SCoil123
    SCoil123 Posts: 2,108 Member
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    ROBOTFOOD wrote: »
    Well you are going to want to take a break from running before those shin splints progress into stress reactions and then fractures requiring months off. Why not swim or bike for a week or two?

    I'm doing C25K and prepping for a race with the other ladies from my boxing group. I am taking a rest day tomorrow even though a run was scheduled but am hoping someone has some pointers to help me recover quickly. I have boxing Friday and we often do sprints to warm up and I don't want to take too many run days off while training for my first 5K. I've been icing my shins ever since I got home tonight.

  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,208 Member
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    You probably came across this when you googled it, but it's worth watching:
    runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/inside-doctors-office-keep-shinsplints-away

    While you're healing, try a strength training program. If you like boxing, you'll probably love deadlifts & squats. :+1:
  • ROBOTFOOD
    ROBOTFOOD Posts: 5,527 Member
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    RICE. Rest, elevation, ice, compression might help a little. I've ran 33 races now since 2008.

    You gotta give your body time to strengthen the bones and joints. Running is pretty hard on them. Especially sprints.
    I'd highly recommend only running on grass, sand, dirt trails for awhile. It's much better than road, cement sidewalks. TM is in the middle.

    I remember I got them several years ago and I just took a week off and they went away. I was also only doing easy runs for marathon training. No sprinting. I was also cycling to maintain endurance.

    Another is if you are using old shoes. If so, go to a specialty running store and get fitted for new shoes. Maybe a foot analysis if unsure what to buy. Some also check your stride etc.
    Best of luck!
  • SCoil123
    SCoil123 Posts: 2,108 Member
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    Cherimoose wrote: »
    You probably came across this when you googled it, but it's worth watching:
    runnersworld.com/injury-prevention-recovery/inside-doctors-office-keep-shinsplints-away

    While you're healing, try a strength training program. If you like boxing, you'll probably love deadlifts & squats. :+1:

    We do an hour of weights before an hour of boxing 3 days a week. I've been running the other days. Tonight was hill sprints, trap dead lifts, clean and press for shoulders, and some kettle bells, then boxing.

    Is there any way to promote shins healing besides just not running at all. How long of a break is usually needed if it's a new problem (last 2 weeks only)

    I do love weights and strength training
  • SCoil123
    SCoil123 Posts: 2,108 Member
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    ROBOTFOOD wrote: »
    RICE. Rest, elevation, ice, compression might help a little. I've ran 33 races now since 2008.

    You gotta give your body time to strengthen the bones and joints. Running is pretty hard on them. Especially sprints.
    I'd highly recommend only running on grass, sand, dirt trails for awhile. It's much better than road, cement sidewalks. TM is in the middle.

    I remember I got them several years ago and I just took a week off and they went away. I was also only doing easy runs for marathon training. No sprinting. I was also cycling to maintain endurance.

    Another is if you are using old shoes. If so, go to a specialty running store and get fitted for new shoes. Maybe a foot analysis if unsure what to buy. Some also check your stride etc.
    Best of luck!


    Thank you!! This advice was exactly what I needed. Just pulled out some pillows to elevate with my ice. My runners are old and probably due to be replaced so looks like I'll go shopping this weekend.

    I used to trail run years ago and never had this issue. I think you are right about avoiding concrete. I'm surrounded by state parks so I have plenty of other options.
  • ROBOTFOOD
    ROBOTFOOD Posts: 5,527 Member
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    SCoil123 wrote: »
    ROBOTFOOD wrote: »
    RICE. Rest, elevation, ice, compression might help a little. I've ran 33 races now since 2008.

    You gotta give your body time to strengthen the bones and joints. Running is pretty hard on them. Especially sprints.
    I'd highly recommend only running on grass, sand, dirt trails for awhile. It's much better than road, cement sidewalks. TM is in the middle.

    I remember I got them several years ago and I just took a week off and they went away. I was also only doing easy runs for marathon training. No sprinting. I was also cycling to maintain endurance.

    Another is if you are using old shoes. If so, go to a specialty running store and get fitted for new shoes. Maybe a foot analysis if unsure what to buy. Some also check your stride etc.
    Best of luck!


    Thank you!! This advice was exactly what I needed. Just pulled out some pillows to elevate with my ice. My runners are old and probably due to be replaced so looks like I'll go shopping this weekend.

    I used to trail run years ago and never had this issue. I think you are right about avoiding concrete. I'm surrounded by state parks so I have plenty of other options.

    Right on. I'm sure you'll notice a big difference. And ya trails are the best.
  • victory68
    victory68 Posts: 76 Member
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    I had old shoes and didn't slow down my running training plan when I was where you are now. Believe me it can get much worse. I carried on and kept my same pace/frequency and ended up going from minor discomfort that would go away by the next morning to injured and unable to run at all for weeks. I know training is fun and important but if you don't slow up and give yourself time to heal you will be out when it matters most. You said you are going to replace your shoes this weekend awesome! But pay attention to your shins if they need 4-5 days with no running, that is miles better than pressing through and needing 4-5 weeks of no running.
  • wildhorsewendy
    wildhorsewendy Posts: 563 Member
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    I got shin splints when I was training for a half-marathon. I did two things: first, I started mountain biking to stay fit while my splints healed. second: I went to a foot specialist who examined my feet and my shoes and knew exactly what sort of stride issues I had-she put pads inside my shoes to build up various areas. I still use those pads, in the new shoes I bought and I have run for about four years now after that, and haven't gotten splints again. I did a full marathon a year and a half ago to celebrate my 50th birthday, with no splint issues, although one of my toenails went black from slipping and hitting the end of my shoe one million times.
  • lk031
    lk031 Posts: 12 Member
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    I've been able to ease my shin splints by doing this - with sneakers on, find a stair that has something nearby you can hold onto (like a wall or railing). Stand on the stair and move your feet forward towards the edge so only your heels are still on the stair. Brace yourself and point your toes downward as far as you can (you'll start to feel like you're about to slide off the edge, so hold on to the railing or wall). Then just bring your toes back up to where you started. I do both feet at the same time, about ten times, for a few days and for me it has made a big difference.
  • SCoil123
    SCoil123 Posts: 2,108 Member
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    Thank you all for the great pointers. Woke up still hurting and taking a full day off from everything since I have lifting and boxing tomorrow.
  • icemom011
    icemom011 Posts: 999 Member
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    You can tape your legs from ankles to the knees with rubber bands, or even any compression tape. You keep that on zfor an hour, take off, rest, tape again. And resting is most important, so no running for a few days.
  • skonger
    skonger Posts: 26 Member
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    Wear compression socks or sleeves around your shins/calves, even when you sleep. I found this helped progress the healing process.
  • esjones12
    esjones12 Posts: 1,363 Member
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    If you are having that type of long lasting pain you really need to stop running, like right now. Depending on severity you can risk serious injury if you keep pushing on. The majority of the time shin splints come from bad biomechanics and from increasing speed and/or distance too quickly.

    You mentioned trail running not bothering you but pavement bothering you - I had this happen too. And it was all related to poor running form. I would get shin splints as well. Now I can run on pavement with no issues because I successfully changed my running stride. I would highly recommend talking to a knowledgeable running coach and having them evaluate your form and shoes.

    If you continue without looking for the real cause it will only be a matter of time before other parts of your body start hurting from trying to compensate.

    Best of luck!
  • RandJ6280
    RandJ6280 Posts: 1,161 Member
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    I hear you. I had started the C25K but I had to quiet last year due to bad shin splint.. I did the whole thing.. good shoes, PT, stretching etc... so... fast forward 1 year... I've put on 25lbs, which I'm not happy about, and I just started waling again... going to try to get it up a notch.
  • pzarnosky
    pzarnosky Posts: 256 Member
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    SCoil123 wrote: »
    I think I'm developing shin splits now that I'm running on the days I don't do boxing. My shins burn at night when I lay down and are getting progressively more painful this week.

    Does anyone have any advice on how to heal quickly and avoid this pain from returning?

    I love my workouts so quitting isn't an option

    Take a break and let them heal before your body doesn't give you another option. When I first started running years ago I had the same mindset. I ran through my shin splints. Then I got to the point where I couldn't put weight on my right leg and I had no choice but to stop running 2 months before my race for 6 weeks.
    That race sucked.
    Little injuries heal a lot faster than big ones.
    Rest now, come back stronger.
  • SCoil123
    SCoil123 Posts: 2,108 Member
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    Took 2 days to do nothing but rest, ice, and elevate. Today I went to do a mellow jog at the gym and used the treadmill to maintain a steady pace. Still sore but the pain is decreasing.

    Thanks again for all the great advice. I'm also adjusting my program to never have 2 days in a row.