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  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Member Posts: 13,580 Member Member Posts: 13,580 Member
    Macy9336 wrote: »
    ritzvin wrote: »
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    whether or not pesticides or gmo are used doesn't define the flavor, quality, or taste of the end product. Actually on the other hand you commonly see organic crops with less flavor, smaller, more imperfect, etc.

    Essentially, the entire concept of "organic" farming is bunk. All foods have been processed. All current crops have been genetically modified through selective breeding for thousands of years. Most organic farms produce less crop, more waste, and organic does NOT mean pesticide free. It just means they can use the following pesticides (which are less effective):

    toxic-organic-substances.png

    Don't get me wrong, i don't like the "image" or the "thought" of pesticides and gmo foods, but regardless of the image i have to stick to the facts. Most conventionally grown crops do not contain enough residual pesticides for it to be dangerous; even the "dirty dozen" the list of foods with the most pesticide residue.
    14111796902_56a6e66046_c.jpg?zoom=2&resize=558%2C788&ssl=1


    So... my opinion is this. If you live in an area that has a farmers market or local crops build a relationship and support your local farmers. I've found some of the best quality, tasting, and beautiful fruits and vegetables at my local farmers markets.

    Ethylene is naturally given off by tomatoes as they're ripening, so I'm thinking your chart is scaremongering.

    ditto on some of the rest of that list too - some of those are fairly innocuous in trace amounts. And some people wash produce with dilute bleach (and rinse well)(which is on the list); with all the zinc oxide creams and powders we apply to our skin, we're probably ingesting trace amounts as well (gets on the lips, in the air); lots more of these are regularly used in the household.

    You can't wash all pesticides and fertilizers off. They are washed into the soil by rain/watering and picked up the roots so they are all through the plants.

    True. You definitely can't wash away the pesticide in bt GMO crops because the plant actually secretes the pesticide due to genetic modification.

    I wasn't talking about GMO, just produce in general. Many plants naturally secrete pesticides.
  • Need2Exerc1seNeed2Exerc1se Member Posts: 13,580 Member Member Posts: 13,580 Member
    My husband and I tried out this organic group that brings the farm fresh veggies/fruits to your door. Well the lettuce was wilty (sp), there were ants covering the shipment, and most of the fruits were bruised. We were not impressed at all, and I went back to getting my regular priced fruit/veg at the grocery store.

    Ah, the pretty fruit phenomenon. The biggest source of waste there is.
  • meganpettigrew86meganpettigrew86 Member Posts: 349 Member Member Posts: 349 Member
    I have given up growing lettuce to sell, I would pick it in the morning to sell that day and it'd be wilting with hours. I think it needs to be kept in a fridge.
    edited September 2017
  • meganpettigrew86meganpettigrew86 Member Posts: 349 Member Member Posts: 349 Member
    My husband and I tried out this organic group that brings the farm fresh veggies/fruits to your door. Well the lettuce was wilty (sp), there were ants covering the shipment, and most of the fruits were bruised. We were not impressed at all, and I went back to getting my regular priced fruit/veg at the grocery store.

    Ah, the pretty fruit phenomenon. The biggest source of waste there is.

    I like that people are fussy, means I can approach the orchards and fruit shops and get box loads of cheap produce to turn into juice/cider or pig food.
  • Old_Cat_LadyOld_Cat_Lady Member Posts: 1,200 Member Member Posts: 1,200 Member
    Aren't all bananas GMO? If not, they would have seeds. Right? In the UK, they have bananas with seeds?
    Macy9336 wrote: »
    Also, all GMO foods are banned in the UK, so don't worry about that. If you are concerned about eating meat raised on GMOs, then there is a GMO free app you can download to help. The grocery shop most against GMOs in the food chain is Waitrose. Waitrose is also where you'll find organic foods at great prices...sometimes cheaper than the conventional option.
    Please correct me if I am wrong so I can learn.
  • rainbowbowrainbowbow Member Posts: 7,492 Member Member Posts: 7,492 Member
    Aren't all bananas GMO? If not, they would have seeds. Right? In the UK, they have bananas with seeds?
    Macy9336 wrote: »
    Also, all GMO foods are banned in the UK, so don't worry about that. If you are concerned about eating meat raised on GMOs, then there is a GMO free app you can download to help. The grocery shop most against GMOs in the food chain is Waitrose. Waitrose is also where you'll find organic foods at great prices...sometimes cheaper than the conventional option.
    Please correct me if I am wrong so I can learn.

    They aren't GMO meaning modified in a lab, but yes ALL plants have been genetically modified in that they've been selectively bred for several thousand of years by humans.

    That's why melons with juicey fruit instead of only rind. Or apples that are tasty and sweet. I could go on as there are thousands of examples of how we've changed and bred plants throughout the past.
    edited September 2017
  • rainbowbowrainbowbow Member Posts: 7,492 Member Member Posts: 7,492 Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    whether or not pesticides or gmo are used doesn't define the flavor, quality, or taste of the end product. Actually on the other hand you commonly see organic crops with less flavor, smaller, more imperfect, etc.

    Essentially, the entire concept of "organic" farming is bunk. All foods have been processed. All current crops have been genetically modified through selective breeding for thousands of years. Most organic farms produce less crop, more waste, and organic does NOT mean pesticide free. It just means they can use the following pesticides (which are less effective):

    toxic-organic-substances.png

    Don't get me wrong, i don't like the "image" or the "thought" of pesticides and gmo foods, but regardless of the image i have to stick to the facts. Most conventionally grown crops do not contain enough residual pesticides for it to be dangerous; even the "dirty dozen" the list of foods with the most pesticide residue.
    14111796902_56a6e66046_c.jpg?zoom=2&resize=558%2C788&ssl=1


    So... my opinion is this. If you live in an area that has a farmers market or local crops build a relationship and support your local farmers. I've found some of the best quality, tasting, and beautiful fruits and vegetables at my local farmers markets.

    Ethylene is naturally given off by tomatoes as they're ripening, so I'm thinking your chart is scaremongering.

    It's meant to be exactly the opposite of that. Lol
  • Old_Cat_LadyOld_Cat_Lady Member Posts: 1,200 Member Member Posts: 1,200 Member
    If someone marks who, please state why? I know water-melons have been GMO's to have more juicy "red" otherwise they would be practically all rind.
  • ritzvinritzvin Member, Premium Posts: 2,764 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,764 Member
    ritzvin wrote: »
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    whether or not pesticides or gmo are used doesn't define the flavor, quality, or taste of the end product. Actually on the other hand you commonly see organic crops with less flavor, smaller, more imperfect, etc.

    Essentially, the entire concept of "organic" farming is bunk. All foods have been processed. All current crops have been genetically modified through selective breeding for thousands of years. Most organic farms produce less crop, more waste, and organic does NOT mean pesticide free. It just means they can use the following pesticides (which are less effective):

    toxic-organic-substances.png

    Don't get me wrong, i don't like the "image" or the "thought" of pesticides and gmo foods, but regardless of the image i have to stick to the facts. Most conventionally grown crops do not contain enough residual pesticides for it to be dangerous; even the "dirty dozen" the list of foods with the most pesticide residue.
    14111796902_56a6e66046_c.jpg?zoom=2&resize=558%2C788&ssl=1


    So... my opinion is this. If you live in an area that has a farmers market or local crops build a relationship and support your local farmers. I've found some of the best quality, tasting, and beautiful fruits and vegetables at my local farmers markets.

    Ethylene is naturally given off by tomatoes as they're ripening, so I'm thinking your chart is scaremongering.

    ditto on some of the rest of that list too - some of those are fairly innocuous in trace amounts. And some people wash produce with dilute bleach (and rinse well)(which is on the list); with all the zinc oxide creams and powders we apply to our skin, we're probably ingesting trace amounts as well (gets on the lips, in the air); lots more of these are regularly used in the household.

    You can't wash all pesticides and fertilizers off. They are washed into the soil by rain/watering and picked up the roots so they are all through the plants.

    In mentioning the washing, I was referring to the fact that bleach is on their list (not the thoroughness of washing).
    edited September 2017
  • Duchy82Duchy82 Member Posts: 558 Member Member Posts: 558 Member
    Personally I would opt for aiming to eat as much local grown fruit and veg instead of going organic, the taste of the fruit and veg I buy from the local farm shop are far superior in taste than anything I have bought from morrisons, tesco, lidl or aldi(including organic). Believe it or not if you eat what's in season it is actually cheaper too. Meat wise, I think free range chicken tastes better than conventional but you get a lot less for your money(i.e. a small free range chicken is £6 vs £3). I also like spoilt pig bacon (around £3 a pack) again a bit more expensive but worth the money. British beef is already free range and generally I find free range pork hard to find (besides the bacon).
  • Old_Cat_LadyOld_Cat_Lady Member Posts: 1,200 Member Member Posts: 1,200 Member
    I don't care about taste. I care about my health.
  • SlimSharonSlimSlimSharonSlim Member Posts: 85 Member Member Posts: 85 Member
    Thank you guys for commenting on my post..............i have read them all with interest...............i invite many more to comment too as it's nice to read all your different opinions and views regarding organic food..............it would be nice if the UK started selling organic wine which is sulphur free..........or just sulphur free wine........but that would be asking too much.
  • meganpettigrew86meganpettigrew86 Member Posts: 349 Member Member Posts: 349 Member
    Thank you guys for commenting on my post..............i have read them all with interest...............i invite many more to comment too as it's nice to read all your different opinions and views regarding organic food..............it would be nice if the UK started selling organic wine which is sulphur free..........or just sulphur free wine........but that would be asking too much.

    Now that's something I don't recommend trying to make for yourself! Those vineyards do well to get the results they do. Can you buy from the cellar door in the UK? Wine tours etc are a big thing in new zealand, I often pop into a local vineyard in my travels, do tastings and buy that way.
  • Old_Cat_LadyOld_Cat_Lady Member Posts: 1,200 Member Member Posts: 1,200 Member
    Gosh, now I wonder why sulfur in wine is bad... great.....
  • meganpettigrew86meganpettigrew86 Member Posts: 349 Member Member Posts: 349 Member
    Gosh, now I wonder why sulfur in wine is bad... great.....

    Because it is yellow and smelly? I'm sure Google knows, it knows all! I have never noticed whether my wine has sulfur in it, I remember vaguely on a wine tour someone promoting their lack of it, but they also say things like " can you taste the shist on which the vines are grown... or the hint of fruit from the raspberries grown two farms over..."
    edited September 2017
  • 3bambi33bambi3 Member Posts: 1,650 Member Member Posts: 1,650 Member
    Gosh, now I wonder why sulfur in wine is bad... great.....

    Because it is yellow and smelly? I'm sure Google knows, it knows all! I have never noticed whether my wine has sulfur in it, I remember vaguely on a wine tour someone promoting their lack of it, but they also say things like " can you taste the shist on which the vines are grown... or the hint of fruit from the raspberries grown two farms over..."

    Sulphur Dioxide is used in winemaking as a preservative and as an anti-oxidant.
  • Macy9336Macy9336 Member Posts: 694 Member Member Posts: 694 Member
    The seeds weren't removed via GE but via cross breeding. Two different methods.
  • Macy9336Macy9336 Member Posts: 694 Member Member Posts: 694 Member
    Your health is more at risk from contracting salmonella from the individual who picks your organic food, packs your organic food in 100% recycled packages, and ships it in a 100% renewable-powered vehicle to your local neighborhood organic farmer's market than from any pesticide residues that may exist on mass-market stuff from fields planted and sprayed exclusively with Monsanto products.

    Actually conventional food carries a higher risk of contamination than organic. Remember the big salmonella outbreak in California amongst the spinach growers? It claimed the lives of several children. Well all the spinach was recalled that tested positive for salmonella and the only brands not affected were the organic ones.
  • Macy9336Macy9336 Member Posts: 694 Member Member Posts: 694 Member
    Aren't all bananas GMO? If not, they would have seeds. Right? In the UK, they have bananas with seeds?
    Macy9336 wrote: »
    Also, all GMO foods are banned in the UK, so don't worry about that. If you are concerned about eating meat raised on GMOs, then there is a GMO free app you can download to help. The grocery shop most against GMOs in the food chain is Waitrose. Waitrose is also where you'll find organic foods at great prices...sometimes cheaper than the conventional option.
    Please correct me if I am wrong so I can learn.

    The seeds were slowly removed over time via cross breeding, not through GE technology. Two different methods.
    Cross breeding is still alive and well today. In fact most of the advances in developing drought resistant crops has been without the use of GE.
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