First time runner.

I’m a first time runner. I’m not fit and I’m over weight. Does anyone have any advice for a first runner? And any other fitness tips?
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Replies

  • GOT_Obsessed
    GOT_Obsessed Posts: 817 Member
    Start with c25k

    Yes this!
  • abirdintherain
    abirdintherain Posts: 73 Member
    I agree with C25K. The important part is not to overdo it. You don't want injuries and you don't want burnout. Slow and steady! Spiriteagle has some good tips!

    Good luck! You'll get there! And I promise it gets easier, even if you feel like you could never do it. Just keep at it!
  • Bry_Fitness70
    Bry_Fitness70 Posts: 2,484 Member
    If you are really unfit, start with walking. Walk every day for 30-45 minutes. When you can do that easily, start adding running into your walks. The Couch to 5k program works for a lot of us, but you can do it on your own as well. When you start running, don't do it every day. Run every other day so your muscles have a chance to heal. You can continue to walk on your off days though. Go to a specialized running store and get fitted for shoes that fit your feet and the way you move. Some of us pronate, some supinate, some have high arches, some have flat feet. Get fitted, rather than just buying at a big box store. Your shins will appreciate it.

    Beat me to this!

    Also, avoid cotton running clothes, go for dry fit synthetic materials that are breathable, anti-chafing, and wick away moisture (especially socks)
  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,888 Member
    Great advice here. If you can walk for about 30 minutes, you should be ready for C25K, but check with your doctor if you have any health conditions or injuries that could prevent you from running.

    Invest in good gear: shoes that have been professionally fitted at a running store, sturdy sports bra, non-cotton socks (pick up some when you go to the running store for your shoes).
  • richardgavel
    richardgavel Posts: 1,000 Member
    Don't worry at all about how fast you are walking/jogging/running. The total mileage you do is much more important and as you do more, the speed comes up gradually. But bring up the mileage slowly.
  • VolsG8rH8r
    VolsG8rH8r Posts: 47 Member
    Buy a good pair of shoes! This is extremely important! Find a running store in your area and try on as many as you can until you find what you like. Asics have always been good for me but everyone is different.
  • lulehlu
    lulehlu Posts: 87 Member
    Go slow. Then go slower. I am also a new runner and I was able to break through and run more than 5 minutes when I slowed down. I was running slower than I can walk (and I’m currently not much faster!).
  • fitoverfortymom
    fitoverfortymom Posts: 3,453 Member
    Get good shoes. Run ridiculously slow.
  • SuzJok85
    SuzJok85 Posts: 14 Member
    I follow Jeff Galloway’s run-walk-run programs. (He has published several books about this.) Depending on your fitness/experience level and speed, he recommends different ratios of walking and running, and you can change as you progress. He, too, has beginners who are unaccustomed to exercise begin with walking.

    I do 4 minutes running and 1 minute walking, over and over until I’ve achieved the desired distance. (I completed an entire marathon this way.) Other people may do 30 seconds running and 30 walking. There are many ratio possibilities. (2:1, 3:1, etc) It may seem strange to walk during running, but the walking breaks help prevent injuries and they actually allow many people to speed up their times, since they are more rested.

    I get really excited about run-walk programs. (My sister got annoyed with all my talk when we were at a pre-race expo, and she suggested to stop people and ask if they had time to talk about “our Lord and Savior, Jeff Galloway.”) Kidding aside, his programs helped this asthmatic, sport-phobic gal off the couch and the built in breaks took some of the fear I had of conquering longer distances. I never wanted to run a mile, and now I distance run for enjoyment. (It’s still challenging, but I live for that runner’s high.)
  • 7lenny7
    7lenny7 Posts: 3,404 Member
    edited February 2018
    I echo the advice to start with walking. I may have missed it in the responses above but when you walk, walk fast enough to get your increase your heart rate. If it's a casual walk it's not going to help you as much unless you're not used it that either. Walk with a purpose, like you're late to a meeting.

    When I ran my first 5K, the only training I did at all was a lot of walking for the 2 months prior.
  • Tacklewasher
    Tacklewasher Posts: 7,122 Member
    Just going to repeat the above.

    I started C25K when I was obese (~275 lbs) Jan 2017. I was already walking a lot on the treadmill (watching hockey). Didn't do the proper running shoes and got shin splints. Getting someone to watch me walk got me into the right shoes and solved the shin splint issues. I'm still overweight (~210) but am doing 10K's and will do a 1/2 marathon this year.
  • 911Doughboy
    911Doughboy Posts: 80 Member
    i never did cough to 5k, but my brother did and it worked for him....start slow and build up from there. i like to set a distance, and just increase my speed every few weeks. also heard the interval training is good.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,210 Member
    I’m a first time runner. I’m not fit and I’m over weight. Does anyone have any advice for a first runner?

    Yes.. Read the sticky post called "Must Read". ;)

    Since you're overweight & unfit, you running form is likely to be off, and that can lead to injuries. So my advice is to ask an experienced runner to critique your running form. Or video yourself running on a treadmill then upload it here. :+1:
  • oilphins
    oilphins Posts: 240 Member
    Don't worry at all about how fast you are walking/jogging/running. The total mileage you do is much more important and as you do more, the speed comes up gradually. But bring up the mileage slowly.

    I agree, start with you walking and then eventually a very light jog. You may want to do a light jog for say 3-4 minutes, then walk for 2, light jog for 3-4 minutes and so forth. You will get faster to a regular run eventually but don't rush into it. It will take some time to build up your cardio. Good luck to you and hope you stick with it.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    If you are really unfit, start with walking. Walk every day for 30-45 minutes. When you can do that easily, start adding running into your walks. The Couch to 5k program works for a lot of us, but you can do it on your own as well. When you start running, don't do it every day. Run every other day so your muscles have a chance to heal. You can continue to walk on your off days though. Go to a specialized running store and get fitted for shoes that fit your feet and the way you move. Some of us pronate, some supinate, some have high arches, some have flat feet. Get fitted, rather than just buying at a big box store. Your shins will appreciate it.

    This exactly. I'm a big fan of setting a distance target(3-4 miles) and once you're comfortable with the distance, drop C25K at the beginning/middle of the session.

    In case you're wondering, walk the rest. you can walk casually or briskly or mix it up. Ingress and Pokémon Go are good ways to mix it up.
  • thesatchito
    thesatchito Posts: 5 Member
    I’m gonna double (maybe quadruple) down on what people have said, c25k is the greatest way to start. I’m on week 8 of the program and yesterday it was the first time IN MY LIFE that i was able to run for 28 minutes without stopping! I’m still overweight but I’ve been losing weight and I’m mailing running my go-to exercise which was absolutely unthinkable for me just a few months ago.

    I also started from zero and I’m lazy af... trust me, if I could do it anyone can. Give it a shot!!
  • fitness_goals_007
    fitness_goals_007 Posts: 26 Member
    Gel asics are really good for running and couch to 5k is an amazing program! I've done it and repeated a few weeks but it's a good program if you're not used to running at all.