Reintroducing dairy back into diet??

pinggolfer96
pinggolfer96 Posts: 2,248 Member
couple years ago, I took out dairy for skin benefits and it actually worked. all forms of dairy! I've been considering reintroducing it lately though. any advice or personal experiences on how it went. I'm weighing the pros vs cons of doing so. im scared of my skin breaking out, but I also feel my body looked and felt best while maintaining dairy in my diet (other than the skin breakouts). thoughts?

Replies

  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,752 Member
    Do it slowly.... You may have developed a slight intolerance to it. Maybe start with no/low lactose dairy.
  • DragonHasTheSapphire
    DragonHasTheSapphire Posts: 184 Member
    Do it slowly.... You may have developed a slight intolerance to it. Maybe start with no/low lactose dairy.

    This.

    I cut all forms of dairy out of my diet for only 2 years, and I started reintroducing it back into my diet my choosing lactose-free dairy. Reason why I wanted to consume dairy again because it's a decent source of calories and filling when I eat full-fat. It used to trigger harmonal issues with my skin, now that my body has adjusted to it, I have no problems with breaking out like I used ot.
  • pinggolfer96
    pinggolfer96 Posts: 2,248 Member
    Bump
  • NovusDies
    NovusDies Posts: 8,940 Member
    I doubt you are going to get better advice. Any time you cut a food out for a lengthy period of time your body adjusts to life without it and you can lose tolerance. Reintroducing slowly is the answer. Your aged cheeses have less lactose too.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,306 Member
    I just eat goat/sheep cheese now on rare occasion and if I'm doing cow dairy, make sure it's of the A2/A2 variety. Now, I never had issues with it but my wife did and she's had good luck on the A2/A2 type of stuff out there that's been introduced into the market in the last few years. If you can tolerate goat/sheep cheese, you should be able to tolerate the A2 cow proteins as well.

    Some of Snowville's grass fed, A2/A2 variety milk products are so awesome.

    http://www.snowvillecreamery.com/a1-and-a2-beta-casein-in-cow-milk.html
  • Hamsibian
    Hamsibian Posts: 1,388 Member
    Maybe try goat or sheep cheese as they tend to cause less reactions. Either way, start small - like a bite or 2 the first day. Then wait a couple of days to see if you react. Build it up overtime.

    Best of luck. I really miss cheese!
  • vallary14
    vallary14 Posts: 215 Member
    Maybe just add cultured dairy like yogurt, cottage cheese and kiefer. These options are good sources of protein and less likely to give you issues than milk. If you want to add milk back try whole milk or half and half(less lactose) or maybe as pp suggested lactose free option.
  • kpsyche
    kpsyche Posts: 345 Member
    Can I ask why you want to reintroduce dairy? (I'm not saying you should or shouldn't it's just that you mentioned why you stopped but not why you want to start again)
  • pinggolfer96
    pinggolfer96 Posts: 2,248 Member
    kpsyche wrote: »
    Can I ask why you want to reintroduce dairy? (I'm not saying you should or shouldn't it's just that you mentioned why you stopped but not why you want to start again)

    I enjoy the versatile of certain dairy products, the macronutrient profiles, the flavor of certain things, the less restrictions I have to enforce, I have supplement companies that send me a lot of products that are whey based....etc
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,344 Member
    If you think lactose might be an issue, try a lactose-free milk such as Fairlife.
  • lemmie177
    lemmie177 Posts: 479 Member
    I stopped eating dairy for the same reason, though mine was all hormonal acne around my chin. I'll occasionally reintroduce yogurt (and ice cream), but there's definitely a threshold where I start breaking out again. I'm also WAY more lactose-intolerant now. Like, I need a lactase supplement to eat ice cream.

    Whey isolate is not a problem. Yogurt and cheeses I can have in moderation. Milk/cottage cheese/regular whey protein are no-no's. IME, eating enough dairy to make up a significant part of my diet is enough to give me skin problems and its not worth it. I also suspect skin problems from dairy aren't directly connected to lactose content. In fact, if a lot of symptomatic ppl do fine with goat/sheep/A2A2 milk, then the problem is more likely the form of casein.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Pick one kind of dairy (whey, if that's what you are interested in) and try it in limited amounts and see.

    My sister thinks cheese makes her break out (she still eats it, but more rarely than she did), so whatever causes that it might not be the lactose (she is fine with yogurt).
  • pinggolfer96
    pinggolfer96 Posts: 2,248 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Pick one kind of dairy (whey, if that's what you are interested in) and try it in limited amounts and see.

    My sister thinks cheese makes her break out (she still eats it, but more rarely than she did), so whatever causes that it might not be the lactose (she is fine with yogurt).

    Dairy has been known and proven (not lactose) to increase mtorc in the body, leading to increased sebum production. So if you are prone to breaking out, this can significantly increase it
  • pinggolfer96
    pinggolfer96 Posts: 2,248 Member
    And for humane reasons as well.... the dairy industry somewhat disgusts me overall with their practices
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited April 2018
    You can buy dairy from local farms you may feel better about, if that's an issue.

    I do a lot of goat's milk/cheese/yogurt just because I like a (somewhat) local farm that produces it and I actually like it better (I don't much like cow's milk, although I like plenty of cow's milk cheeses and yogurts). Not sure how that would affect break outs, as I don't get them and don't seem affected negatively by dairy at all.

    If it's also ethical, though, and that doesn't resolve it, I'd say there are lots of alternatives to dairy, so no need to reintroduce.