Strength Training

Options
Are health benefits of strength training that are reported in research due to the actual strength training (i.e. lifting 30 minutes, X times a week) or from being strong?

Replies

  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,840 Member
    Options
    I think both. Particularly older people and people trying to lose weight tend to lose muscle, and weight training helps keep muscle, so part of the benefits are just from having more muscle. But also, I am a diabetic, and the weight exercise part improves my blood glucose and insulin resistance on a daily basis. If I skip a day I can see a rise in my bg levels the next day, and if I work out particularly hard with my legs, my glucose stays lower than expected for 24 hours.
  • giantrobot_powerlifting
    giantrobot_powerlifting Posts: 2,598 Member
    Options
    Do you really need research to verify the healthy benefits of being strong? Really?
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    Options
    I'll add - the heart gets a little workout that is beneficial during the strength training.

    The recovery to a good workout is actually where the benefits come from, depending of course which benefits you are referring to. Like above mentioned glucose/insulin improvements.

    The getting stronger as result of the recovery/rest certainly has benefits too.

    And likely the mental attitude needed to do good strong lifting workouts - benefits life too.
    Stress takes on new meaning when doing lifts.
    Managing stress in life has many benefits too.
  • k8eekins
    k8eekins Posts: 2,264 Member
    Options
    Are health benefits of strength training that are reported in research due to the actual strength training (i.e. lifting 30 minutes, X times a week) or from being strong?
    • Non-animal & animal sourced protein nutrition for musculoskeletal health/integrity
    • Musculoskeletal fitness

    I'd had to re-think how you'd ended your query "Are health benefits of strength training that are reported in research due to ... being strong?" It depends on one's gradual muscle loss %s over the years and additionally, some are predisposed to be built stronger (genetics); Bone density Vs muscles/fat compositions, which some claim is a result of generational-conditioning. This said however, if neglected - those who fit into this very category are just as susceptible as anyone else.
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,841 Member
    edited May 2018
    Options
    my guess is the time being active and using your body has more benefits than the being strong part. A person can be strong but be very unhealthy, just being strong doesn't imply good health. And a person can be active but not super strong and be very healthy. Although being both strong and active is the best of both worlds.

    If it was being strong that provided the health benefits, someone could just get strong and be done with fitness, except for maintenance which wouldn't have to be a level that would be considered fitness.

    The person who lifts regularly as a lifestyle ,without even focusing on strength will probably see more benefits than the strong less active person .