Core/ab excercises to prevent back pain

I had an episode of back problems that lasted about a month and a half. It’s gone away now and I am feeling back to normal and getting back into exercising. I was told to strengthen my abs to help protect my back - what exercises would you recommend?

Replies

  • Ws2016
    Ws2016 Posts: 431 Member
    Pallofs, back extensions, crunches, planks. But just as important din’t forget to stretch those muscles.
    https://fitbottomedgirls.com/2016/04/best-5-stretches-low-back-pain/
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,937 Member
    This is one of those "see a physical therapist" ones.

    Was it your upper or lower back? How did you hurt it? Did it go away on its own? How long did it take? Do you know exactly what it was, like a diagnosis?
  • MIpiccolo
    MIpiccolo Posts: 65 Member
    Thanks! I never saw a docto for it as I could still function, just certain things hurt. (Bending over or after sitting for a long time) It was my lower back, but no, I never got any specific diagnosis. Any thoughts?
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    I highly recommend the book "The Back Mechanic" by Stuart McGill. Not only does it give you an idea about what might aggravate the pain, but also gives you day to day back hygiene and movement habits to make the recurrence of pain less likely, tailored specifically to your type of back pain, including favorable exercises and stretches. The source of my back pain is completely different and chronic (structural damage from an accident), but the book has been very effective for reducing extreme flare-ups that leave me bed-ridden.
  • jdubois5351
    jdubois5351 Posts: 460 Member
    I highly recommend the book "The Back Mechanic" by Stuart McGill. Not only does it give you an idea about what might aggravate the pain, but also gives you day to day back hygiene and movement habits to make the recurrence of pain less likely, tailored specifically to your type of back pain, including favorable exercises and stretches. The source of my back pain is completely different and chronic (structural damage from an accident), but the book has been very effective for reducing extreme flare-ups that leave me bed-ridden.

    Thanks for the resommendation, I will definitely look into it!


  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    I highly recommend the book "The Back Mechanic" by Stuart McGill. Not only does it give you an idea about what might aggravate the pain, but also gives you day to day back hygiene and movement habits to make the recurrence of pain less likely, tailored specifically to your type of back pain, including favorable exercises and stretches. The source of my back pain is completely different and chronic (structural damage from an accident), but the book has been very effective for reducing extreme flare-ups that leave me bed-ridden.

    Thanks for the resommendation, I will definitely look into it!


    If you decide to get it, be warned that it's not a quick fix and is something that you'll need to keep doing. I pretty much always have some level of back pain, that's not going to go away, but I haven't had a major flare-up this year at all, and used to happen pretty much every 2-3 months.
  • bpotts44
    bpotts44 Posts: 1,066 Member
    I have used the Mckenzie Method of physical therapy for low back paint. The book is You can try 7 Steps to a Pain Free Life, but I would recommend seeing a PT: http://www.mckenzieinstitute.org/
  • sschauer513
    sschauer513 Posts: 313 Member
    Planks are my go to when the back flares up but yoga has also done wonders on keeping it from flaring up and loosen things up.
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    edited July 2018
    I believe that dead-bugs are good for people with back problems, but whether they actually help the condition or just run a lower risk of triggering a flare-up is more than I know. (My book recommends them for new-to-strength-training people with a history of back problems.)

    Reiterating advice from previous posters to check with your doctor first.
  • Azdak
    Azdak Posts: 8,281 Member
    Glutes, glutes, glutes, glutes, glutes, glutes.

    More important than “abs”.
  • ks4e
    ks4e Posts: 374 Member
    I second seeing a physical therapist. I had lower back pain and pelvic pain and 3 months of physical therapy helped me get back to where I should be, although I am still not 100%.
  • gia_incognito
    gia_incognito Posts: 103 Member
    I had a similar issue with my back and went to a physical therapist. Don't bother going unless you're willing to do the exercises they suggest. A lot have to do with a yoga ball and stabilizing the core while working on the ball. Tbh I quit bc I wasn't diligent enough with the exercises and didn't want to waste the time/money. The back pain went away on its own after awhile though I still can't lift heavy weight.
  • RaeBeeBaby
    RaeBeeBaby Posts: 4,323 Member
    I have chronic neck and back issues, especially lower back. Bending over weeding the garden and lifting my granddaughter without paying attention to form are the most recent aggravators. My latest episode lasted several weeks with pain, sciatica and muscle spasms.

    The best treatment I found was a TENS unit (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). You can get one on Amazon for around $25 and that was a lifesaver. It really does help with the pain stimulus and I used it daily for over a week. Since I have no money to see a physical therapist (and insurance doesn't cover), I looked up exercises online. I also did YouTube yoga videos especially for back pain, learned to lift better (using my legs more and closer to the body), took a little bit of NSAIDs, muscle rub like Icy Hot and lots and lots of gentle stretching.

    I've heard that ab exercises help with back pain, so have been trying to incorporate more crunches (on exercise ball) and planks.