Good morning squats vs just bending over with a barbell?

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Scubdup
Scubdup Posts: 104 Member
edited August 2018 in Fitness and Exercise
After some expert advice...

I feel like my weak hamstrings would benefit from doing the first half of a "Good Morning" squat - essentially, from the starting position of a regular squat, flexing at the hip, with the legs staying relatively straight, and "just" bending over before straightening at the hips again to come back up into a standing position. Essentially moving between these two positions:-

Good-Mornings.png

I can see from most videos that the "second half" of the standard "Good Morning" appears to be a drop down into a deep squat before returning to standing as you would out of a normal squat. I'm guessing that this is to ensure the back is more vertical (and more protected) when rising.

I'm conscious that my proposed movement will stress the back more, and I'm not intending to load up nearly as much weight as for a regular squat, but I was just wondering - does anyone else do these? Are they going to be a decent exercise to help strengthen my lower back and hamstrings? Is there anything I'm not considering?

Thanks a lot for any help.
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Replies

  • capaul42
    capaul42 Posts: 1,390 Member
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    Actually, I've never seen any kind of squat added to a good morning. It's always bend over, return. And they were part of my last strength program, Strong Curves.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    Yeah, I've never heard of that either. A good morning and a squat are two different things. I've never seen them combined the way you're describing, OP.
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,650 Member
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    3rded what the others have said. squats and good mornings are not the same thing, and I'm not sure why someone would try to merge them.
  • shaf238
    shaf238 Posts: 4,021 Member
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    If you're concerned about your hamstrings, there's other exercises you can turn to such as the straight leg deadlift, prone leg curl, norwegian curl, etc.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,097 Member
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    Scubdup wrote: »
    After some expert advice...

    I feel like my weak hamstrings would benefit from doing the first half of a "Good Morning" squat - essentially, from the starting position of a regular squat, flexing at the hip, with the legs staying relatively straight, and "just" bending over before straightening at the hips again to come back up into a standing position. Essentially moving between these two positions:-

    Good-Mornings.png

    I can see from most videos that the "second half" of the standard "Good Morning" appears to be a drop down into a deep squat before returning to standing as you would out of a normal squat. I'm guessing that this is to ensure the back is more vertical (and more protected) when rising.

    I'm conscious that my proposed movement will stress the back more, and I'm not intending to load up nearly as much weight as for a regular squat, but I was just wondering - does anyone else do these? Are they going to be a decent exercise to help strengthen my lower back and hamstrings? Is there anything I'm not considering?

    Thanks a lot for any help.

    Have you considered doing a low bar squat, deadlift, or RDL? Those will help you strengthen your lower back and hamstrings more efficiently since you can do them safely with heavier weight.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,751 Member
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    We joke about good morning squats... Like when your squat goes really wrong and you're so bent over it may as well be a good morning. I've also never heard of it as an actual exercise!
  • hesn92
    hesn92 Posts: 5,967 Member
    edited August 2018
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    I thought good morning squats was a term used to describe when you go down into a squat and can't get back up without your butt going up first so that you end up in kind of a good morning position. Lol. I didn't know that was an actual exercise. good mornings are basically a romanian deadlift except with the barbell on your back instead of in your hands
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,209 Member
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    Scubdup wrote: »
    I feel like my weak hamstrings would benefit from doing the first half of a "Good Morning"

    How are you determining your hamstrings are weak?
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    That's how Bruce Lee ruined his back.

    Do RDLs instead.
  • Scubdup
    Scubdup Posts: 104 Member
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    Apologies - I was reading all your "Where's the squat in a Good Morning" posts, and I was like, "Seriously? Every **** video I looked at this morning featured it - and I though that was weird too" - hence my post.

    See, for example:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkuS9RdDZXM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHhQOaKNbjQ

    Looking back at my browser history, I think it must have auto-completed so that I ended up inadvertently searching Youtube for "Good Morning Squat" - which is the odd movement I was describing.

    Now I can see that a "Good Morning" is the exercise I was asking about.

    I think I possibly have a anterior pelvic tilt, that is causing me to have an odd bum-out, tum-out posture, and also possibly causing my buttwink at the bottom of my squats.

    I've been doing RDLs and one-leg stiff leg deadlifts as part of my training to address this. I was just trying to come up with some variations.

  • notarunnermfp
    notarunnermfp Posts: 43 Member
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    I love how all the recommendations after those vids are "how to FIX the good morning squat" lol
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,209 Member
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    Scubdup wrote: »
    I think I possibly have a anterior pelvic tilt, that is causing me to have an odd bum-out, tum-out posture, and also possibly causing my buttwink at the bottom of my squats.

    APT isn't fixed by working hamstrings & back. It's also an overdiagnosed condition, but if you think you have it, i suggest verifying it with a physical therapist. Until then, i'd follow a pro-designed strength program without modifying it. Fixing things that don't need fixing can throw the body out of whack and cause injuries.

    This explains how buttwink isn't necessarily bad:
    https://youtu.be/b1f6mk1aVuA
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,650 Member
    edited August 2018
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    Proof that any dickhead can put a video on youtube...
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,841 Member
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    just because someone posts a video doesn't mean this is a good idea. lol
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
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    Again, the downside here is the potential for crippling back pain for the rest of your life. Something can always go wrong, you could get hit by a car walking across the street, but barbell good mornings are unique in the level of danger they pose. Read the StrongLifts page about squats and note the warning about what you're wanting to do.

    Other exercises can strengthen your hamstrings without much danger.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,097 Member
    edited August 2018
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    Scubdup wrote: »
    Apologies - I was reading all your "Where's the squat in a Good Morning" posts, and I was like, "Seriously? Every **** video I looked at this morning featured it - and I though that was weird too" - hence my post.

    See, for example:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkuS9RdDZXM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHhQOaKNbjQ

    Looking back at my browser history, I think it must have auto-completed so that I ended up inadvertently searching Youtube for "Good Morning Squat" - which is the odd movement I was describing.

    Now I can see that a "Good Morning" is the exercise I was asking about.

    I think I possibly have a anterior pelvic tilt, that is causing me to have an odd bum-out, tum-out posture, and also possibly causing my buttwink at the bottom of my squats.

    I've been doing RDLs and one-leg stiff leg deadlifts as part of my training to address this. I was just trying to come up with some variations.
    Most people are way too worried about APT and just need to continue train normally and it will work itself out. In rare cases a coach is needed to cue the client. I often will have the lifter use a ab wheel or planks if necessary.
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
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    Deadlifts, bent over rows
  • Scubdup
    Scubdup Posts: 104 Member
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    Thanks for the further replies.

    I've given barbell Good Mornings a go (at a light weight) to see how they feel, and to be honest, they didn't feel that great. Pretty unnatural movement (which, I know, isn't always a bad thing) and given what @NorthCascades in particular had to say about them, I think I'll give them a miss.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,688 Member
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    This is what I have a lot of my clients do to help if they aren't entirely good with free weights.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvJT3isvYAk

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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