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I've never cooked with peppers or chilies but I'd like to start - any suggestions?

abbynormalartistabbynormalartist Member Posts: 318 Member Member Posts: 318 Member
in Recipes
I've never used chilies or peppers in any of my cooking but I'd like to start. I don't like very spicy food but I feel like there are certain kinds of chilies and peppers that can probably add a lot of flavor without a ton of heat. Any suggestions on types that are good for flavor without the burn? Or what kinds of recipes really shine with the added spice?

Replies

  • enterdangerenterdanger Member Posts: 2,445 Member Member Posts: 2,445 Member
    Anaheim chilis aren't too hot. You could also use poblanos. Keep in mind, you can control the heat of some peppers just by removing the seeds. A de-seeded jalapeno isn't very spicy at all. Just be careful to either wear gloves or wash you hands like crazy after de-seeding some spicy peppers.

    I like stuffed peppers. You can just buy regular bell peppers, cut the tops off, fill them with whatever you like and bake. I've been mixing quinoa, corn, onion, and enchilada sauce and stuffing my peppers with them and then topping with cheese. You can use ground beef, tomatoes, rice, and italian seasoning. I like peppers in my omelets. I will eat mild red, yellow, and green peppers with laughing cow cheese.

    Lots of different things you can do.

  • puffbratpuffbrat Member Posts: 2,804 Member Member Posts: 2,804 Member
    In general, peppers that are larger in size tend more to the milder end. When pan frying, add chiles at the same time you add garlic to get that awesome flavor. Wash your hands immediately after chopping and handling chiles; that capsaicin is no joke.
  • polish_girlpolish_girl Member Posts: 21 Member Member Posts: 21 Member
    I chopped up green bell peppers, sauted them w/onion & garlic and added cooked chopped chicken breast & added a little teriyaki sauce. It was sonethjng i threw together for a quick meal & it turned out pretty good.
  • jogetsgainsjogetsgains Member Posts: 341 Member Member Posts: 341 Member
    if you really don't want any heat you can go with bell peppers. I think green bell peppers are vile, but orange, red, and yellow have nice flavor and color.
    I agree with the Anaheim and poblano recommendation, too.
    if you want to acclimate yourself to spice you can always go with a little dabaroo of hot sauce.
  • AndyWR72AndyWR72 Member, Premium Posts: 35 Member Member, Premium Posts: 35 Member
    Use extreme caution when dealing with the hotter peppers, I was making chilli powder by drying out Carolina Reaper peppers. I made a mistake with drying and managed to make my apartment uninhabitable for a few hours.
  • alicebhsia1alicebhsia1 Member Posts: 82 Member Member Posts: 82 Member
    they sell little cans of chopped mild green chilies. a teaspoon or two added to soups or chilies or cornbread or whatever lends a nice flavor without much heat. i personally don't really like the flavor of anaheim or poblano peppers but there is a cheese stuffed poblano dish that is available at most mexican restaurants that isn't too bad you could try. for really good hot chili flavor without too much heat, make sure to remove every single single seed! (i do this with a knife, and chop small and only use a little tiny bit if you use fresh, (like a 1/4 teaspoon finely chopped jalapeno or thai volcano pepper for a three egg omelette as an example. though for even milder they sell "tamed" canned sliced jalapenos that are pretty mild with a good flavor. you can also experiment with powdered cayenne pepper, ( a little teensy bit goes a long way!) red pepper flakes, not too spicy, and louisiana hot sauce or sriracha. again if you don't like heat you'd want to just add a teensy little bit.
  • missysippy930missysippy930 Member Posts: 2,514 Member Member Posts: 2,514 Member
    The pith and ribs of the peppers, as well as the seeds, are where most of the heat comes from. Be very careful of touching your face when using hot peppers. When my DD was a child she was picking a few jalapenos for me, rubbed her eye after and it burned her eye, so the heat is in the flesh as well. Be careful washing your hands after handling hot peppers. We love spicy, so I use the whole pepper. Just cut off the stem end and cut the pepper up.
    Try using maybe half of the flesh to begin. Some peppers are hotter than others. You can google it and choose one that is less spicy to begin with. Jalapenos have good flavor and are available year round and easy to find.
    edited September 2018
  • abbynormalartistabbynormalartist Member Posts: 318 Member Member Posts: 318 Member
    crazyravr wrote: »
    I've never used chilies or peppers in any of my cooking but I'd like to start. I don't like very spicy food but I feel like there are certain kinds of chilies and peppers that can probably add a lot of flavor without a ton of heat. Any suggestions on types that are good for flavor without the burn? Or what kinds of recipes really shine with the added spice?

    Here is simple advice. Get yourself Mina Harissa paste. Start adding that to everything you cook. Very good on meats and mixed into grains.

    I trust anything you say about food, Crazyravr. I just ordered a jar of Mina Harissa from Amazon. Thank you!
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