Foods you were OVERestimating calories for before you used a food scale?

2

Replies

  • amy19355
    amy19355 Posts: 805 Member
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    I have been cooking beans from dried for years , at first for economic reasons and then for taste and control of salt content.
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    amy19355 wrote: »
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    I have been cooking beans from dried for years , at first for economic reasons and then for taste and control of salt content.

    It also gets around the problem with weighing canned beans drained when the labelled calories include the liquid in the weight. The drained beans can have almost double the calories by weight compared to the label. OTOH, weighing dried is fine if you make one serving at a time, but typically you will be making many more and often already mixed with other ingredients while cooking. One of the things I like about frozen peas, beans and corn is that you can weigh them accurately and make a serving at a time. that's important at my house as I am about the only one, other than one of my kids who is away at college, who eats beans (other than green beans) and peas somewhat regularly.
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,027 Member
    amy19355 wrote: »
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    I have been cooking beans from dried for years , at first for economic reasons and then for taste and control of salt content.

    It also gets around the problem with weighing canned beans drained when the labelled calories include the liquid in the weight. The drained beans can have almost double the calories by weight compared to the label. OTOH, weighing dried is fine if you make one serving at a time, but typically you will be making many more and often already mixed with other ingredients while cooking. One of the things I like about frozen peas, beans and corn is that you can weigh them accurately and make a serving at a time. that's important at my house as I am about the only one, other than one of my kids who is away at college, who eats beans (other than green beans) and peas somewhat regularly.

    When I use canned beans, I'll drain them and then weigh them, and use a USDA cooked entry. Not perfect, but it seems to have worked so far. I don't typically see frozen beans (other than green beans) around here at all, I wish I could find them!
  • 23rochelle23
    23rochelle23 Posts: 269 Member
    Also peanut butter by about 1/3rd. Cashews/other nuts (probably trying to be too cautious like some have mentioned). Mayonnaise and other condiments and spray creams etc
    Even when I was weighing using a spring scale I was way over estimating them.

    Strangely the things I was underestimating are things that don’t really matter like spinach so I feel a bit spoiled using my new digital scale and getting to eat more of all of the yummy things.

    But weighing cheese makes me sad ☹️
  • collectingblues
    collectingblues Posts: 2,540 Member
    NJCJF wrote: »
    of all things...peanut butter-- was only eating 1.5 tbsp instead of 2.
    also cereal

    I was the same way. I started weighing peanut butter, and had a moment of "OH!" It wasn't *nearly* as much as I was logging.
  • collectingblues
    collectingblues Posts: 2,540 Member
    amy19355 wrote: »
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    I have been cooking beans from dried for years , at first for economic reasons and then for taste and control of salt content.

    Ditto. It takes a little bit of preplanning -- like, I can't decide that afternoon that I want to make chili for dinner that night -- but it's worth the effort, and really doesn't take all that much work. Beans soak overnight, then get cooked before I make the meal. Even kidney beans only take an hour to cook, and Great Northern are closer to 30 minutes or so...
  • happytree923
    happytree923 Posts: 464 Member
    Pasta! My weighed out serving is less than I would eat before I tried to control portions but more than what I would try to guesstimate with a stupid measuring cup after I started counting calories.
  • happytree923
    happytree923 Posts: 464 Member
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    Whatttt the bean thing is ridiculous! Does the serving/weight include the water?
  • 23rochelle23
    23rochelle23 Posts: 269 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    I can't believe all the people who were OVERestimating peanut butter! The pitiful sight of a properly weighed serving would make angels cry :cry:

    I was overestimating weight wise ... but allllllll the calories in that one delicious spread on my crumpet still makes me very very sad 😔
  • HoneyBadger302
    HoneyBadger302 Posts: 1,740 Member
    The main things were veggies and meats. I actually could consumer more of those than I had been estimating pre-food-scale.

    Other things, like pasta and avocado, were very sad revelations and went the opposite direction....
  • megbeveridge93
    megbeveridge93 Posts: 238 Member
    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    Do you think if you sifted the flour it would be closer to the weight listed? It gets kind of packed when it's in the container!
  • NJCJF
    NJCJF Posts: 134 Member
    pinuplove wrote: »
    NJCJF wrote: »
    of all things...peanut butter-- was only eating 1.5 tbsp instead of 2.
    also cereal

    I have to weigh peanut butter. What they call 1 tablespoon and what I call 1 tablespoon is not the same :lol:

    LOL this was after weighing. I just types tbsp instead of grams cause I didn't have the jaw in front of me and I can't remember how many grams in a serving
  • NJCJF
    NJCJF Posts: 134 Member
    kami3006 wrote: »
    NJCJF wrote: »
    of all things...peanut butter-- was only eating 1.5 tbsp instead of 2.
    also cereal

    All that pb you could have been eating... :'(

    I know right?
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    edited October 2018
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    Whatttt the bean thing is ridiculous! Does the serving/weight include the water?

    Yes, it does. The labels are calories for the product as packaged unless specified otherwise. If you pour off the water, weigh the beans and use the weight from the can for a serving you will log a lot fewer calories than it actually is.
  • emmies_123
    emmies_123 Posts: 513 Member
    steak and ribs. I have a thing about fat (texture) so I tend to leave a lot of meat behind while avoiding fat/bones. I would just go by my initial measurement of the whole thing.

    Now I go back and weight a second time after i'm done eating. What I ate is the difference between the two measurements. Saves me a lot of calories!
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    Bread for me. Slices can be way underestimated. Then some are overestimated.
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    amy19355 wrote: »
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    I have been cooking beans from dried for years , at first for economic reasons and then for taste and control of salt content.

    It also gets around the problem with weighing canned beans drained when the labelled calories include the liquid in the weight. The drained beans can have almost double the calories by weight compared to the label. OTOH, weighing dried is fine if you make one serving at a time, but typically you will be making many more and often already mixed with other ingredients while cooking. One of the things I like about frozen peas, beans and corn is that you can weigh them accurately and make a serving at a time. that's important at my house as I am about the only one, other than one of my kids who is away at college, who eats beans (other than green beans) and peas somewhat regularly.

    My black beans state drained.
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    amy19355 wrote: »
    Canned beans typically say 3.5 servings per can, but after measuring I have found that it is almost always nearly exactly two servings. I can eat more beans but that also means I have to BUY more beans. Worth it.

    However, 1 dry cup of flour is typically more than the weight in grams as it is listed on the package.

    I have been cooking beans from dried for years , at first for economic reasons and then for taste and control of salt content.

    Ditto. It takes a little bit of preplanning -- like, I can't decide that afternoon that I want to make chili for dinner that night -- but it's worth the effort, and really doesn't take all that much work. Beans soak overnight, then get cooked before I make the meal. Even kidney beans only take an hour to cook, and Great Northern are closer to 30 minutes or so...

    Pressure cooker works wonders! Just make sure the valve works right and does not get clogged.
  • MelissaPhippsFeagins
    MelissaPhippsFeagins Posts: 8,064 Member
    skram01 wrote: »
    Shredded cheddar cheese. I would eyeball a quarter cup. Found out I was shooting myself by a decent amount. Yay, more cheese!!

    Yes, cheese and butter.