Depression

Hi all,

Anyone trying to loose weight/get in shape whilst battling depression?

Replies

  • Hotelsma
    Hotelsma Posts: 366 Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    Hotelsma wrote: »
    csplatt wrote: »
    I highly recommend seeing a psychologist weekly! Changed my life, although mine is for reoccurring extreme anxiety and panic (seeing an emergency that isn’t there). Being on top of my health gives me something to feel in control of, thus gives me an area in my life that I don’t worry about!

    Hay

    Unfortunately I don’t have the capacity to see a psychologist weekly.

    Then I suggest seeing one as often as you can. That's frankly the only reason I'm able to exercise (among other things).

    I don’t know where you from but in the uk it’s not as easy
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    edited April 2019
    Hotelsma wrote: »
    aokoye wrote: »
    Hotelsma wrote: »
    csplatt wrote: »
    I highly recommend seeing a psychologist weekly! Changed my life, although mine is for reoccurring extreme anxiety and panic (seeing an emergency that isn’t there). Being on top of my health gives me something to feel in control of, thus gives me an area in my life that I don’t worry about!

    Hay

    Unfortunately I don’t have the capacity to see a psychologist weekly.

    Then I suggest seeing one as often as you can. That's frankly the only reason I'm able to exercise (among other things).

    I don’t know where you from but in the uk it’s not as easy

    I'm not in the UK, but I definitely know people in the UK who are also in therapy. It wasn't/isn't clear if the issue with your not being able to see a therapist weekly has to do with money, availability of therapists, or something else entirely (or multiple things). I suggested going as often as you can because that could potentially mitigate the cost issue, if cost is an issue that is. And I'm very serious when I say that if I wasn't in therapy I wouldn't be able to exercise. I would not be functional enough to get myself out of bed to do any sort of exercising.
  • Rocknut53
    Rocknut53 Posts: 1,795 Member


    "Unfortunately I don’t have the capacity to see a psychologist weekly"


    When my depression resurfaced over the past year, I tried everything to try to beat it. I finally talked to my family doctor about it. She put me on meds to kind of jumpstart the process. She suggested seeing a psychologist that specializes in cognitive therapy. I can't afford that so actually researched it and got a book, Cognitive Therapy for Dummies, read that and then found an online program called "Thrive" through my local university that I'm actively participating in. With a combination of all the above I have managed to get my binge eating under control, have lost some of the weight I had regained (20 pounds is what I need to lose to get back to my goal that I achieved in 2017) and am making good progress on gaining my life back. I don't want to take the meds for long, but they have been very beneficial and I'm not sure I could have done this without them.

    @lthames0810 I'm right there with you.
  • Hotelsma
    Hotelsma Posts: 366 Member
    Rocknut53 wrote: »

    "Unfortunately I don’t have the capacity to see a psychologist weekly"


    When my depression resurfaced over the past year, I tried everything to try to beat it. I finally talked to my family doctor about it. She put me on meds to kind of jumpstart the process. She suggested seeing a psychologist that specializes in cognitive therapy. I can't afford that so actually researched it and got a book, Cognitive Therapy for Dummies, read that and then found an online program called "Thrive" through my local university that I'm actively participating in. With a combination of all the above I have managed to get my binge eating under control, have lost some of the weight I had regained (20 pounds is what I need to lose to get back to my goal that I achieved in 2017) and am making good progress on gaining my life back. I don't want to take the meds for long, but they have been very beneficial and I'm not sure I could have done this without them.

    @lthames0810 I'm right there with you.

    Thank you my friend 👍🏾👊🏾
  • wildredbill
    wildredbill Posts: 26 Member
    I see you started a constructive conversation here, Hotelsma. Nice going.
  • Hotelsma
    Hotelsma Posts: 366 Member
    That was my plan. I know there’s plenty out there struggling and wanted to help each other
  • mstarks01
    mstarks01 Posts: 109 Member
    Know that you are not alone. People with depression tend to isolate and get withdrawn, but taking steps (like you reaching out) to improve your condition is essential, no matter how small.

    Focus on what is in front of you. What can you do today to help with your recovery? For me, that's getting out of the house and just showing up at the gym. It doesn't matter if my workout goes well. The exercise and environment, itself, it therapeutic. I often find that I think it's going to be a terrible workout, but my the end I feel much, much better.

    Getting professional help is also not a failure. It can really change some people's lives. Between medication and therapy, it could be that thing that gets you to a level-set so you can take it from there. Depression is a medical condition. Don't let stigma hold you back from getting evaluated.

    Best of luck. We know you can do great things!
  • magnusthenerd
    magnusthenerd Posts: 1,207 Member
    I hate that it can sometimes be hard to tell if it is depression or real accumulated fatigue in the gym.

    As far as medication changing you, isn't that what it should do? Like if there was a magic wand that could make you into you minus depression, would you not wave it?
  • Hotelsma
    Hotelsma Posts: 366 Member
    mstarks01 wrote: »
    Know that you are not alone. People with depression tend to isolate and get withdrawn, but taking steps (like you reaching out) to improve your condition is essential, no matter how small.

    Focus on what is in front of you. What can you do today to help with your recovery? For me, that's getting out of the house and just showing up at the gym. It doesn't matter if my workout goes well. The exercise and environment, itself, it therapeutic. I often find that I think it's going to be a terrible workout, but my the end I feel much, much better.

    Getting professional help is also not a failure. It can really change some people's lives. Between medication and therapy, it could be that thing that gets you to a level-set so you can take it from there. Depression is a medical condition. Don't let stigma hold you back from getting evaluated.

    Best of luck. We know you can do great things!

    Hello mate.

    I’m taking the same approach. For now I’m just trying to get to the gym everyday and focus on that. But sometimes I get derailed with my thoughts. I’ll keep battling
  • Hotelsma
    Hotelsma Posts: 366 Member
    I hate that it can sometimes be hard to tell if it is depression or real accumulated fatigue in the gym.

    As far as medication changing you, isn't that what it should do? Like if there was a magic wand that could make you into you minus depression, would you not wave it?


    Hello,

    I hear what you saying but my fear is becoming dependant on them. I’d rather fix myself naturally in this instance but I understand your argument.
  • Rocknut53
    Rocknut53 Posts: 1,795 Member
    Hotelsma wrote: »
    I hate that it can sometimes be hard to tell if it is depression or real accumulated fatigue in the gym.

    As far as medication changing you, isn't that what it should do? Like if there was a magic wand that could make you into you minus depression, would you not wave it?


    Hello,

    I hear what you saying but my fear is becoming dependant on them. I’d rather fix myself naturally in this instance but I understand your argument.

    If you can fix yourself naturally, that would be awesome. I've been able to do that for the past 10 years, then many things happened in my life that just plain derailed me and I knew I couldn't do it on my own this time. In the future, maybe. My mother committed suicide during one of her depressive episodes and that is my biggest fear, that some day I may reach that point. The hardest part is admitting that outside help is what you need. I agree that exercise is one of the most helpful strategies, once you get off the couch and out the door.
  • mstarks01
    mstarks01 Posts: 109 Member
    edited April 2019
    Hotelsma wrote: »
    I hear what you saying but my fear is becoming dependant on them. I’d rather fix myself naturally in this instance but I understand your argument.

    This is of course completely your decision, but if your doctor feels that medication is warranted, I think you should reconsider. Antidepressants do not cause dependency like an opioid or something like that. Think of it this way--if you were diabetic, would you take insulin? I bet you would.

    For many people, depression is a disease which has its roots in a chemical imbalance in the brain. Antidepressants do not make you feel high or necessarily even happy. They just get you to a baseline that most other people are already at, so you can take it from there.

    Again, this is a discussion to have with a doctor, but if he/she thinks they are warranted, the worse likely outcome if you try them is you decide they aren't for you and then you (again, with your doctor) stop.

    I'm not pushing meds, only suggesting that it is an option a lot of people have taken and they have successful outcomes because of it.