Vegan results so far...

So for starters I went Vegan 2.5 months ago, so not the full year, so I can't say it's 100% due to this.

Last year, I had a physical and blood drawn.

my Cholesterol Total was at 251 mg/dl, HDL Cholesterol 69 mg/dl, LDL Cholesterol 168 mg/dl, Triglyceride 71 mg/dl, non HDL Cholesterol 182.

I had a physical on Monday and blood drawn again and was quite shocked.

my Cholesterol Total was at 177 mg/dl, HDL Cholesterol 64 mg/dl, LDL Cholesterol 103 mg/dl, Triglyceride 50 mg/dl, non HDL Cholesterol 113.

Even though I had planned on staying Vegan, this cemented that even harder. I also had my B12 and other items tested and they all came out fantastic as well.

Just thought I would share this, in case anyone was on the fence about it. Keep in mind, I do workout 4 - 5 days / week, so that could have contributed to this a little as well.

Replies

  • Crafty_camper123
    Crafty_camper123 Posts: 1,440 Member
    Great job on getting your numbers down!! Looks like a good way of eating for you to stick to!
  • SkunkOnARug
    SkunkOnARug Posts: 27 Member
    I'm a vegetarian, for the most part. My cholesterol was 98 at my last blood test 2 weeks ago. It is down even though I had gained some weight and cut back on exercising. I'm getting back on the weight loss and exercising bandwagon as of today. I have found over the years that different things work differently for everyone. There is more than one cause of high cholesterol. Keep up the good work and what works for you.
  • jflongo
    jflongo Posts: 289 Member
    erickirb wrote: »
    How much weight have you lost over that time frame?

    most likely it is the exercise and weight loss, not the change to Vegan that led to the better health markers. If you wanted the true experiment you would have had to keep activity and calorie levels the same before and after the diet switch.

    Probably since my last blood test in April 2018, maybe around 10 lbs. April 2018, I was around 204 lbs, now I'm around 194 lbs, and a little over 6'. I started back in the Gym in December of 2017, so was working out constantly for around 4 months before I had that blood test in April 2018. I was probably around 215 - 220lbs in December of 2017.
  • OooohToast
    OooohToast Posts: 257 Member
    Well done on the great results !
  • girlwithcurls2
    girlwithcurls2 Posts: 2,257 Member
    That's great news! I just had my bloodwork done and it was good, thank goodness. I'm not vegan and don't have plans to be. I did ask my doctor is working out benefits cholesterol. Other than keeping you at a healthy weight if you're eating according to plan, her answer was no. It's genetics and diet. My genetics are terrible, so I'm keeping an eye on it. I'll be sad if the day comes when I have to give up eggs and cheese...
  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,838 Member
    That's great news! I just had my bloodwork done and it was good, thank goodness. I'm not vegan and don't have plans to be. I did ask my doctor is working out benefits cholesterol. Other than keeping you at a healthy weight if you're eating according to plan, her answer was no. It's genetics and diet. My genetics are terrible, so I'm keeping an eye on it. I'll be sad if the day comes when I have to give up eggs and cheese...

    It sounds like your doctor believes you have familial hypercholesterolemia. This form of high cholesterol is genetic but can be helped by diet. The majority of people with high cholesterol, however, do not have this and dietery cholesterol does not have much effect on their blood cholesterol level.
  • nowine4me
    nowine4me Posts: 3,985 Member
    @jflongo I’m glad your markers have improved and it Sounds like you enjoy this WOE. Cautionary tale, I went WFPB over a year ago and had (literally) perfect blood work and felt great. Eventually, I let vegan junk food creep in and crowd out the beans, tempeh and other protein sources. By December, I could barely get the energy to run. IMO, you don’t need too much protein, but you do need enough.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,961 Member
    Congratulations on the great results. You might want to keep in mind that B12 deficiencies take more than a couple of months to show up (your body can store B12, and you don't use that much), so you might want to be sure you're consuming some fortified foods (like fortified nutritional yeast, which I like on popcorn, especially if you mix it with a little cayenne and ground chipotle -- good in a tofu scramble, too).
  • jflongo
    jflongo Posts: 289 Member
    edited May 2019
    Congratulations on the great results. You might want to keep in mind that B12 deficiencies take more than a couple of months to show up (your body can store B12, and you don't use that much), so you might want to be sure you're consuming some fortified foods (like fortified nutritional yeast, which I like on popcorn, especially if you mix it with a little cayenne and ground chipotle -- good in a tofu scramble, too).

    Thank you. I do get a serving of nutritional yeast in just about every day and take a 1000mcg pill every day.

    Regarding everyone saying many things are genetic, I would not call that 100% true. Just because my mother had colon cancer, doesn't mean I would. Many of my family members are overweight, eat like crap, and some smoke. Many of that has caused their diseases, not necessarily genetics.
  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,838 Member
    jflongo wrote: »
    Congratulations on the great results. You might want to keep in mind that B12 deficiencies take more than a couple of months to show up (your body can store B12, and you don't use that much), so you might want to be sure you're consuming some fortified foods (like fortified nutritional yeast, which I like on popcorn, especially if you mix it with a little cayenne and ground chipotle -- good in a tofu scramble, too).

    Thank you. I do get a serving of nutritional yeast in just about every day and take a 1000mcg pill every day.

    Regarding everyone saying many things are genetic, I would not call that 100% true. Just because my mother had colon cancer, doesn't mean I would. Many of my family members are overweight, eat like crap, and some smoke. Many of that has caused their diseases, not necessarily genetics.

    First, I don’t believe anyone said your high cholesterol is genetic. I did say it sounded like someone else’s doctor believed they have a specific form of genetic high cholesterol based on the advice that person got. Most people do not have this. You probably do not have this unless your doctor diagnosed you with it.

    Second, saying something is “genetic” in the way you’re using it is very broad. The genetics for familial hypercholesterolemia and colon cancer are not the same. Without going into great detail, some conditions are very strongly influenced by genetics, but many are combinations of genetics and other factors. We can’t directly compare the mechanisms of different disease processss just by calling them “genetic.”
  • jflongo
    jflongo Posts: 289 Member
    apullum wrote: »
    jflongo wrote: »
    Congratulations on the great results. You might want to keep in mind that B12 deficiencies take more than a couple of months to show up (your body can store B12, and you don't use that much), so you might want to be sure you're consuming some fortified foods (like fortified nutritional yeast, which I like on popcorn, especially if you mix it with a little cayenne and ground chipotle -- good in a tofu scramble, too).

    Thank you. I do get a serving of nutritional yeast in just about every day and take a 1000mcg pill every day.

    Regarding everyone saying many things are genetic, I would not call that 100% true. Just because my mother had colon cancer, doesn't mean I would. Many of my family members are overweight, eat like crap, and some smoke. Many of that has caused their diseases, not necessarily genetics.

    First, I don’t believe anyone said your high cholesterol is genetic. I did say it sounded like someone else’s doctor believed they have a specific form of genetic high cholesterol based on the advice that person got. Most people do not have this. You probably do not have this unless your doctor diagnosed you with it.

    Second, saying something is “genetic” in the way you’re using it is very broad. The genetics for familial hypercholesterolemia and colon cancer are not the same. Without going into great detail, some conditions are very strongly influenced by genetics, but many are combinations of genetics and other factors. We can’t directly compare the mechanisms of different disease processss just by calling them “genetic.”

    So many people say things are genetics. Is it true that some things are passed down by genetics, yes. However, quite often these lay dormant, and then your crappy eating and lifestyle is what wakes them up.
  • apullum
    apullum Posts: 4,838 Member
    jflongo wrote: »
    apullum wrote: »
    jflongo wrote: »
    Congratulations on the great results. You might want to keep in mind that B12 deficiencies take more than a couple of months to show up (your body can store B12, and you don't use that much), so you might want to be sure you're consuming some fortified foods (like fortified nutritional yeast, which I like on popcorn, especially if you mix it with a little cayenne and ground chipotle -- good in a tofu scramble, too).

    Thank you. I do get a serving of nutritional yeast in just about every day and take a 1000mcg pill every day.

    Regarding everyone saying many things are genetic, I would not call that 100% true. Just because my mother had colon cancer, doesn't mean I would. Many of my family members are overweight, eat like crap, and some smoke. Many of that has caused their diseases, not necessarily genetics.

    First, I don’t believe anyone said your high cholesterol is genetic. I did say it sounded like someone else’s doctor believed they have a specific form of genetic high cholesterol based on the advice that person got. Most people do not have this. You probably do not have this unless your doctor diagnosed you with it.

    Second, saying something is “genetic” in the way you’re using it is very broad. The genetics for familial hypercholesterolemia and colon cancer are not the same. Without going into great detail, some conditions are very strongly influenced by genetics, but many are combinations of genetics and other factors. We can’t directly compare the mechanisms of different disease processss just by calling them “genetic.”

    So many people say things are genetics. Is it true that some things are passed down by genetics, yes. However, quite often these lay dormant, and then your crappy eating and lifestyle is what wakes them up.

    That's really not how things being "genetic" works overall. Genetics of disease processes are a lot more complicated than what you're describing. It depends very much on what medical condition is being discussed.

    However, for the purposes of this post, a small proportion of the population has an inherited condition called familial hypercholesterolemia. Those individuals' cholesterol levels can be influenced more readily by diet.

    The larger proportion of the population with high cholesterol does not have this condition. Their cholesterol levels respond most strongly to increased exercise and weight loss if they are overweight.