Raisin Wine

MIltonBradley1
MIltonBradley1 Posts: 688 Member
Every stop to think why they don't make wine out of raisins? I mean, its from a grape so why not? Just take a bunch of raisins and run them through a press.

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Replies

  • laprimaJenny
    laprimaJenny Posts: 1,495 Member
    Actually, it is possible to make wine from raisins. Although they need to be boiled first.
  • Roza42
    Roza42 Posts: 246 Member
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.
  • rfitnessmfplulz
    rfitnessmfplulz Posts: 154 Member
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    So raisins don't exercise. Thus they get old and wrinkly.
  • rileysowner
    rileysowner Posts: 8,073 Member
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    Fermentation requires oxygen, thus aerobic.

    Raisins are dried grapes, you would need to add water to release the sugar so that you can ferment it. Boiling helps release the sugar into the boiling water so that when yeast is added it can ferment.
  • laprimaJenny
    laprimaJenny Posts: 1,495 Member
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    Fermentation requires oxygen, thus aerobic.

    Raisins are dried grapes, you would need to add water to release the sugar so that you can ferment it. Boiling helps release the sugar into the boiling water so that when yeast is added it can ferment.

    Exactly! This guy knows what he’s talking about.
  • laprimaJenny
    laprimaJenny Posts: 1,495 Member
    edited July 2019
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    So raisins don't exercise. Thus they get old and wrinkly.

    Actually, I think dehydration is what caused it.
  • erickirb
    erickirb Posts: 12,292 Member
    There is also a lot less juice left in raisins, so that means you would need so many more grapes (raisins) to make one bottle of wine
  • laprimaJenny
    laprimaJenny Posts: 1,495 Member
    erickirb wrote: »
    There is also a lot less juice left in raisins, so that means you would need so many more grapes (raisins) to make one bottle of wine

    That’s what happens when they get dehydrated. It takes a lot more work to get the juices going.
  • InkgirlKC
    InkgirlKC Posts: 251 Member
    This sounds so gross!
  • Roza42
    Roza42 Posts: 246 Member
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    Fermentation requires oxygen, thus aerobic.

    Raisins are dried grapes, you would need to add water to release the sugar so that you can ferment it. Boiling helps release the sugar into the boiling water so that when yeast is added it can ferment.

    Exactly! This guy knows what he’s talking about.

    Except that he is wrong and fermentation is not an aerobic process. If you have ever made sauerkraut or other fermented vegetables you would know that you have to keep them submerged away from O2 or they rot.

    Look it up.
  • JeromeBarry1
    JeromeBarry1 Posts: 10,182 Member
    A grape is a grape of course, but the reason grapes rather than dried grapes are used for wine is the water content of grape is a free resource.
  • laprimaJenny
    laprimaJenny Posts: 1,495 Member
    edited July 2019
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    Fermentation requires oxygen, thus aerobic.

    Raisins are dried grapes, you would need to add water to release the sugar so that you can ferment it. Boiling helps release the sugar into the boiling water so that when yeast is added it can ferment.

    Exactly! This guy knows what he’s talking about.

    Except that he is wrong and fermentation is not an aerobic process. If you have ever made sauerkraut or other fermented vegetables you would know that you have to keep them submerged away from O2 or they rot.

    Look it up.

    Well then, you are right about fermentation generally speaking. Although the process of making wine actually has two distinct stages known as primary and secondary, aka aerobic and anaerobic fermentations. That is why it is important that you do not use an air-lock container during the first few days of fermentation, which allows the juice to be open to the air. Then the wine is transferred to a secondary fermentor when fermentation is nearly complete. Once fermentation is on the decline, the wine must be placed in a more air-tight environment to keep it safe.


  • Roza42
    Roza42 Posts: 246 Member
    edited July 2019
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    Fermentation requires oxygen, thus aerobic.

    Raisins are dried grapes, you would need to add water to release the sugar so that you can ferment it. Boiling helps release the sugar into the boiling water so that when yeast is added it can ferment.

    Exactly! This guy knows what he’s talking about.

    Except that he is wrong and fermentation is not an aerobic process. If you have ever made sauerkraut or other fermented vegetables you would know that you have to keep them submerged away from O2 or they rot.

    Look it up.

    Well then, you are right about fermentation generally speaking. Although the process of making wine actually has two distinct stages known as primary and secondary, aka aerobic and anaerobic fermentations. That is why it is important that you do not use an air-lock container during the first few days of fermentation, which allows the juice to be open to the air. Then the wine is transferred to a secondary fermentor when fermentation is nearly complete. Once fermentation is on the decline, the wine must be placed in a more air-tight environment to keep it safe.


    No, there is no such thing as aerobic fermentation. The airlock is because of the gases generated by fermentation will blow your container open, and the airlock keeps outside air out. The chemistry is pretty simple. We made "wine" in a fermentation lab in Bio 101. You can even look it up.
  • ilfaith
    ilfaith Posts: 16,770 Member
    Not exactly raisins, but many sweeter wines, such as sauternes and reislings, are actually made from grapes which have begun to shrivel.

    https://www.winemag.com/2017/09/08/the-beautiful-bounty-of-botrytized-wines/
  • laprimaJenny
    laprimaJenny Posts: 1,495 Member
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Roza42 wrote: »
    Because....all you need for fermentation is water and sugar. Fermentation is an anaerobic process.

    Fermentation requires oxygen, thus aerobic.

    Raisins are dried grapes, you would need to add water to release the sugar so that you can ferment it. Boiling helps release the sugar into the boiling water so that when yeast is added it can ferment.

    Exactly! This guy knows what he’s talking about.

    Except that he is wrong and fermentation is not an aerobic process. If you have ever made sauerkraut or other fermented vegetables you would know that you have to keep them submerged away from O2 or they rot.

    Look it up.

    Well then, you are right about fermentation generally speaking. Although the process of making wine actually has two distinct stages known as primary and secondary, aka aerobic and anaerobic fermentations. That is why it is important that you do not use an air-lock container during the first few days of fermentation, which allows the juice to be open to the air. Then the wine is transferred to a secondary fermentor when fermentation is nearly complete. Once fermentation is on the decline, the wine must be placed in a more air-tight environment to keep it safe.


    No, there is no such thing as aerobic fermentation. The airlock is because of the gases generated by fermentation will blow your container open, and the airlock keeps outside air out. The chemistry is pretty simple. We made "wine" in a fermentation lab in Bio 101.

    Well I sure didn’t learn that in Bio 101, but one thing I know for sure is that I come from a family that has been making wine for many generations. I was always told that the primary fermentation is actually for the release of minimal amounts of oxygen to be introduced during the lag phase of fermentation, in which reproduction is mostly concentrated. Hence, there is oxygen slowly released into the containers. Some people call it aerobic fermentation, technically speaking it should be called the reproduction phase. Regardless of what it’s called though, oxygen is indeed present.

    The idea that you need to take the oxygen away to produce good wine seems counter-productive to me. It seems to run counter to the growing return of the barrique/amphora method of winemaking throughout many European countries, which use containers that allow more than average amounts of oxygen exposure during fermentation. To top it off these wines are remarkably mineral-rich wines, intensely aromatic, and certainly there is nothing wrong with the way they taste and even with long term-aging. Then again, it’s merely my uneducated opinion.
  • Roza42
    Roza42 Posts: 246 Member
    I didn't say there wasn't o2 present as it is hard to have an oxygen free environment. I was saying it isn't part of the fermentation process which from my understanding predates free oxygen in the atmosphere. Fermentation does not release oxygen. Fermentation releases carbon dioxide. That is the chemistry.

    Not sure what is meant by lag and reproduction phase. But yeast reproduces without oxygen and in the lag phase if a gas is being reintroduced it would more likely be carbon dioxide.

    This article has a good explanation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermentation
  • beagletracks
    beagletracks Posts: 6,035 Member
    edited July 2019
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    I thought this was how wine is made.