☆BONE BROTH RECIPES ☆

TickledBuddha76
TickledBuddha76 Posts: 6 Member
Hello I'm looking to add to my bone broth recipes....please share what you add to yours :)

Replies

  • Cheesy567
    Cheesy567 Posts: 1,186 Member
    Soup bones (roasted if you have time, meaty ones are ok too) or chicken carcasses.
    A gallon of water.
    1-2 tablespoons of vinegar.
    Whatever veggie scraps you have in the fridge/ freezer.
    A couple bay leaves, garlic, peppercorns, other seasonings you prefer. (Put them in a small cotton mesh bag to make straining the broth easier).

    Put the bones in the pot, cover with water. Add the vinegar, veggies, and seasonings. Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmering. Cover and simmer for a day or so. I usually strain out the veggies once they're mushy. If you're using meaty soup bones, pull them out after a day, remove the meat (it's good to eat!) and return the bones and any other connective tissue back to the pot.
  • trisH_7183
    trisH_7183 Posts: 1,486 Member
    edited April 2016
    I use the same ingreds in my slow cooker. Bring to a boil,skim,then turn on low & let it simmer all night. Love broth for soup base,to cook pasta in,add to potato dishes.Every Fall my Mother would use beef broth to cook a pot of fall veggies.....so yummy!
  • RaeBeeBaby
    RaeBeeBaby Posts: 4,245 Member
    Cheesy567 wrote: »
    Soup bones (roasted if you have time, meaty ones are ok too) or chicken carcasses.
    A gallon of water.
    1-2 tablespoons of vinegar.
    Whatever veggie scraps you have in the fridge/ freezer.
    A couple bay leaves, garlic, peppercorns, other seasonings you prefer. (Put them in a small cotton mesh bag to make straining the broth easier).

    Put the bones in the pot, cover with water. Add the vinegar, veggies, and seasonings. Bring to a boil, then reduce to simmering. Cover and simmer for a day or so. I usually strain out the veggies once they're mushy. If you're using meaty soup bones, pull them out after a day, remove the meat (it's good to eat!) and return the bones and any other connective tissue back to the pot.

    I pretty much use this exact recipe using a slow cooker instead of a pot on the stove, and without doing the mesh bag for the seasonings. I just strain everything out at the end. I usually cook it for 2-3 days or until hubby starts to complain about the soup smell permeating the house!
  • TickledBuddha76
    TickledBuddha76 Posts: 6 Member
    Thank you :) This sounds wonderful!
  • dklibert
    dklibert Posts: 1,196 Member
    edited April 2016
    I am making my first bone broth this weekend. I am trying the crock pot method. I have chicken bones, green onions, garlic and ginger going. I followed this recipe: steamykitchen.com/39418-slow-cooker-bone-broth-asian-style.html

    So far it smells and looks great. I did take a cup out this morning to drink. I love the Asian flavor. You can't buy that in a can or box. :smile:
  • weatherking2019
    weatherking2019 Posts: 943 Member
    Want to try making my 1st REAL Bone Broth. I want to make Beef Bone Broth. Anyone have any good recipes?
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 7,599 Member
    The broths in my household are a haphazard by product of food waste management.

    Whenever we eat bone in chicken, pork or beef I freeze the leftover bones in a large ziplock bag. Ditto any bits of carcases from deboning meat myself. Any clean vegetable trimmings and peels go into the bag too. When the bag is full I make broth by simmering the contents at a lazy boil for several hours with a halved onion, reduce to concentrate to minimize use of freezer space, strain, and freeze.

    If we ate more shellfish I would have a separate bag for seafood waste such as prawn peels and crab carcasses.

    Of course real bone broth made from browned beef bones will be richer and good enough for consome, but this method works well enough for broths I need for risotto and vegetable soups.
  • OldHobo
    OldHobo Posts: 647 Member
    I don't have a recipe so much as a lesson learned the hard way over many years of making stocks and a few years of logging calories. Whenever I'd make a batch of stock and use in several dishes over a few days, I'd always gain more or lose less weight than the caloric arithmetic predicted. I saw this time and time again. Finally figured out that I wasn't keeping the temperature low enough to prevent the surface agitation that comes with the bubbles in boiling liquid.

    You may know how to incorporate liquid into fat or vice versa from making salad dressing or mayonaise. You agitate the liquid with a whisk, beater or blender and the oil and vinegar slowly do mix, making an emulsion. It happens in minutes with salad dressing and mayonnaise because you are agitating the heck out of the stuff but if the agitation is more gentle, with a slow boil over several hours, for instance, enough fat will be emulsified into the stock to sabotage your calorie management. You'll probably still get to peel some fat off the top after refrigeration overnight but you'll also be leaving quite a bit behind.

    The recipes all say, "bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer."

    Simmer means not boiling. In other words, not bubbling.

    When a simmering temperature is specified it is most often 180°F. I like to push it a little further to maybe 195° but the closer to 212° at sea-level you get, the closer you have to watch it.

  • lilithsrose
    lilithsrose Posts: 752 Member
    edited October 2019
    I don't really use a recipe. I just save up my beef bones/fat/skin in the freezer or use a fresh rotisserie chicken carcass. I throw the bones/fat/skin into a stock pot. Then I add water, salt, pepper, crushed garlic cloves, a whole onion (peeled and cut in half), and carrots. I usually add rosemary, thyme and parsley. If I'm making beef broth and I have some mushrooms or radishes, I will toss those in the pot too.

    Bring to a boil, then lower to a simmer and cook for several hours. Strain through a fine sieve and then refrigerate. Scoop off the excess fat after its cold.

    If you're starting with uncooked beef bones, I'd suggest boiling them for a half hour in just water to remove the impurities, then drain that and rinse the bones before starting your broth.

    Oh, and FYI, broth freezes very well so feel free to make a large batch.
  • fdhunt1
    fdhunt1 Posts: 222 Member
    I use a Nesco roaster for bone broth. Makes a little more than a slow cooker.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    Want to try making my 1st REAL Bone Broth. I want to make Beef Bone Broth. Anyone have any good recipes?

    Honestly just look for any recipe for beef stock. "Bone broth" is essentially stock (or maybe broth depending on how it's made) with a new name and an absurdly expensive price tag.
  • weatherking2019
    weatherking2019 Posts: 943 Member
    @aokoye I've made chicken bone broth many times over. I just never got around to making Beef bone broth.
    When I go to Korean restaurant, I love getting the OX tail soup. It makes my skin glow the next day:)

    I shall set aside some time to do it this weekend!

    Oh, I found this that looks good: https://hipfoodiemom.com/2014/02/19/korean-oxtail-soup-kkori-gomtang/
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 7,599 Member
    One of my favourite beef broths is the one used for Vietnamese pho. But a traditional French recipe for beef consome should give you great results.
  • vaman
    vaman Posts: 253 Member
    Buying beef bones that would be suitable for making stock/broth is becoming very difficult these days, most super markets no longer carry them.

    A true butcher shop is likely a good source, but there are very few of these left anymore.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    vaman wrote: »
    Buying beef bones that would be suitable for making stock/broth is becoming very difficult these days, most super markets no longer carry them.

    A true butcher shop is likely a good source, but there are very few of these left anymore.

    Asian grocery stores, among others, are easy places to find them. Also just asking the people at the butcher counter of your average grocery store would be another way to try and find them. I can find them in the freezer section of most of the grocery stores I go to.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    @aokoye I've made chicken bone broth many times over. I just never got around to making Beef bone broth.
    When I go to Korean restaurant, I love getting the OX tail soup. It makes my skin glow the next day:)

    I shall set aside some time to do it this weekend!

    Oh, I found this that looks good: https://hipfoodiemom.com/2014/02/19/korean-oxtail-soup-kkori-gomtang/

    I love oxtail. I typically have it in the context of caribbean dishes, but I almost bought some ready made oxtail soup at the Korean grocery store I was at on Monday. I also almost bought some oxtail but reminded myself that I wasn't planning on making oxtail stew this week ;) It might be slightly easier to find a bajillion recipes for stock/broth if you don't search for "bone broth", but it should be fine either way.