Advice/tips on shrinking tummy while building booty

Hey I’m new here. I’ve always been more of a cardio junkie (due to enjoying playing sports that focus more on cardio) versus weight lifter, but as I’ve gotten older I would like to build more muscle (esp in my booty) while keeping tone at the same time. Is that even a struggle or possible? I feel kinda silly, since all I’ve known to do my entire life is cardio to knock off stomach fat. This applies in the same mentality to my diet. Since I struggle with cystic acne, I have to limit or avoid certain foods leaving me with what I perceive to be minimal options - and I’ve only ever known the concept of pursuing calorie deficit for weight loss purposes.

Replies

  • TaraRoxanna
    TaraRoxanna Posts: 6 Member
    Thank you so much for the advice!! I am at a good weight for my height. Honestly I don’t mind if I fluctuate on the scale as long as I like what I’m seeing in the mirror and feel good. When eating healthy and working out my body has fluctuated between 110-117 throughout the years (I’m just 5ft haha). But you’ve definitely helped me go in the right direction! Thanks again!
  • ecjim
    ecjim Posts: 957 Member
    Let me just echo what Sardelsa said - She gave you excellent advice, Strong Curves is a good choice for a lifting program for you goals - Google Bret Contreras - mantain your diet or + 200 cals , with 100 - 120 gms of protien per day and you should be good .
  • staticsplit
    staticsplit Posts: 538 Member
    edited December 2019
    Sardelsa always has excellent advice. Recomp is the way to go. Slow and steady. I used to be a cardio bunny but lifting has totally changed my relationship with my body, with food, and I really like how I look now. Plus I like being able to deadlift most of my body weight and feel like a superhero.

    If you've done no weight training before and you can afford it, I'd hire a trainer for a few sessions to make sure you're using proper form (I was doing squats wrong--not leaning back in my heels enough--and could have injured myself at some point).

    I also have cystic acne but it's hormonal (PCOS aka excess androgens) for me. I did experiments and what I eat doesn't affect my skin in the slightest. The only things that worked for me was hormonal birth control (but for various other reasons that also didn't work), accutane back when I was about 20 (but it gradually came back), and more recently spironolactone. Do you know the cause of your acne?
  • TaraRoxanna
    TaraRoxanna Posts: 6 Member
    @staticsplit haha, yes! I want to be strong!

    I so wish I had the money and time to hire a trainer but I’m pushing myself most days right now just to get in 30 minutes a day among mommyhood and other pressing obligations. I’m still trying to find a balance between maintaining my mental health while also pursuing my physical health. I keep telling myself this is only a season of life and eventually I’ll catch my breath lol.

    So some foods, like regular cows milk causes me to have a cystic breakouts. I think it’s due to the hormones in the milk. I have thought for a long time though that it’s mostly caused by excessive androgens (my dad has cystic acne) and I have been told I have PCOS and then two other physicians said otherwise. I’ve not tried Spironolactone/accutane but only due to the cost and a lot of research (mostly through following and keeping up with people in the acne community on insta), I’ve heard it comes back more often than not. I have two friends who tried it and both had their acne come back. Crazy enough, being pregnant with my youngest got rid of my cystic acne once the placenta took over my hormone production, but three months after having him the cystic acne came back. Right now I’m managing it via food restrictions, excercise and products I use on my face.
  • TaraRoxanna
    TaraRoxanna Posts: 6 Member
    edited December 2019
    @staticsplit my husband and I would like to have another baby in the near future so birth control is off the table for now. I have used birth control in the past but it was before ever having cystic acne ( I was 24 years old when I developed cysts!).
  • TaraRoxanna
    TaraRoxanna Posts: 6 Member
    edited December 2019
    @ecjim wow! 100-120 in protein. In other words just eat chicken and avocados all day? Jk. But from monitoring my daily calories I notice I don’t usually eat a lot of protein. Is this why people buy protein shakes? Lol.
  • nicsflyingcircus
    nicsflyingcircus Posts: 2,178 Member
    @ecjim wow! 100-120 in protein. In other words just eat chicken and avocados all day? Jk. But from monitoring my daily calories I notice I don’t usually eat a lot of protein. Is this why people buy protein shakes? Lol.

    100-120g of protein is only 400-480 calories out of your daily budget, which should be 1200 at a minimum.

    Greek yogurt, chicken, pork (leaner cuts like Center Cut chops and Tenderloin and Loin), leaner beef (ground, steak or roasts), ground turkey, eggs, cheeses (regular or reduced-fat) are all good protein choices just on the animal side. There's also legumes and beans and plethora of vegetarian or vegan options. I occasionally use protein powder, but I don't need it to get over 100, or even 120, on a 1375 calorie budget.
  • GaryRuns
    GaryRuns Posts: 486 Member
    @staticsplit my husband and I would like to have another baby in the near future so birth control is off the table for now. I have used birth control in the past but it was before ever having cystic acne ( I was 24 years old when I developed cysts!).
    @ecjim wow! 100-120 in protein. In other words just eat chicken and avocados all day? Jk. But from monitoring my daily calories I notice I don’t usually eat a lot of protein. Is this why people buy protein shakes? Lol.

    Be sure and hit @sardelsa up about pregnancy too. Apparently it's her fourth state of physique training, bulking, cutting, maintenance and pregnancy. :D

    In my simplified view there are three requirements to build muscle, 1) eating 0.8-1.0 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day, 2) performing a well-established, progressive lifting program correctly and consistently, 3) giving yourself adequate recovery time from #2.

    If you're not used to eating that much protein it can take some getting used to, but it doesn't take long. Protein shakes are convenient ways to hit your goal but certainly shouldn't be the primary source of protein. And be careful of them if you're watching your calorie intake because many of them use lots of sweeteners to make them taste better.
  • TaraRoxanna
    TaraRoxanna Posts: 6 Member
    GaryRuns wrote: »
    @staticsplit my husband and I would like to have another baby in the near future so birth control is off the table for now. I have used birth control in the past but it was before ever having cystic acne ( I was 24 years old when I developed cysts!).
    @ecjim wow! 100-120 in protein. In other words just eat chicken and avocados all day? Jk. But from monitoring my daily calories I notice I don’t usually eat a lot of protein. Is this why people buy protein shakes? Lol.

    Be sure and hit @sardelsa up about pregnancy too. Apparently it's her fourth state of physique training, bulking, cutting, maintenance and pregnancy. :D

    In my simplified view there are three requirements to build muscle, 1) eating 0.8-1.0 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day, 2) performing a well-established, progressive lifting program correctly and consistently, 3) giving yourself adequate recovery time from #2.

    If you're not used to eating that much protein it can take some getting used to, but it doesn't take long. Protein shakes are convenient ways to hit your goal but certainly shouldn't be the primary source of protein. And be careful of them if you're watching your calorie intake because many of them use lots of sweeteners to make them taste better.

    Oh wow sounds like she knows her stuff then! Y’all are all so helpful! I am always skeptical of using online chat groups to connect with people because I’ve always found them to be a little on the sketchy side but this is great! Very simple yet helpful information. I realized when she said 100-120g in protein that I had read the .8-1.0g per lb and it lined up with what she was saying.

    I can see the trouble with shakes! I much prefer to get my nutrients natural as well. I did research earlier on foods high in protein and have come up with some I can and usually do eat and could eat more of. It’s funny having researched so much on the vitamins in food and never really giving much care about the rest 🤦🏽‍♀️ lol.
  • francesca_grey
    francesca_grey Posts: 97 Member
    edited December 2019
    If you want ideas on what to eat, you can add me as a friend and look at my diary, although I’m cutting so my calories are a bit lower. I have a goats’ milk protein shake a few times a week, I throw half an avocado and a few ounces of greens in it and while it sounds weird it is so good. Other times I mix the powder with yogurt or make pancakes.

    I’ve been training all year, not even all that hard necessarily — just very consistent — and I’m so happy with the results. Weight lifting has changed my relationship with my body too. I’m not nearly as hard on myself and stopped comparing myself to other womens’ bodies. Training for health first and aesthetics second has helped with that shift in mindset and keeps me going more consistently. I also don’t consume fitness media and instagram models for the same reason.

    Good luck and I hope you find a plan that works for you!