Just started running- advice pls

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  • Azdak
    Azdak Posts: 8,281 Member
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    One of the advantages of a treadmill is that you can construct different types of interval workouts. These help pass the time and also help you improve both endurance and speed.

    The work intervals don’t have to be all-out—this is not HIIT. The simplest is to warm up for 5 min, alternate 1 min faster with 1 min slower and repeat. Recovery speed is 50% of max and work speed is maybe 75%-80%. Work up to 16 intervals. With warm up and cool down that is 45 min.

    Another is to alternate 4 min work intervals with 1 min recovery, with about the same total work time.

    You can do “steps”: increase speed by 0.1 mph each minute for however many you want, then go back and start the sequence over again. Sometimes I would do 3 x 10 min, so you would increase the speed 1.0 mph during each “circuit” before starting over.

    You make up anything want. I have found that increasing the intensity in small chunks makes it more tolerable—and then you get all the benefits of increased intensity.

  • allother94
    allother94 Posts: 588 Member
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    dewd2 wrote: »
    As a person who runs all the time, I also HATE running on a dreadmill. If that's all I had I'd probably give up. Get outside a few times. Even over winter I'll probably use the dreadmill only once or twice.

    Good luck.

    Dwed2, I’ve seen you post a number of times. Do you mind me asking what your weekly workout looks like?
  • goatg
    goatg Posts: 1,399 Member
    edited December 2019
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    Build your base for a couple of months. As DancingMoosie said, don't worry about intensity yet. This will make you much less prone to injury, trust me. Maybe run every other day, include strength building leg workouts like walking lunges, squats, step ups, remember to stretch, roll, and keep your pace conversational (the moment you can't talk while running you're going too fast --for the first couple of months).

    I find it helps my mind to break up my runs. I think of the first 10 minutes as a warmup (I'll start super slow and go to a moderate pace in 8-12 min), then I section off the workout after that. You can keep the intensity the same by adjusting the speed/incline in tandem. Maybe take the first 2 min at a 0% incline, next 2 1%, next 2 2%, then walk for 1 minute. Eventually your body and mind will adjust and even find pleasure.


    PS,
    a longer stride often isn't better (quite the opposite). Among other reading material: https://runnerclick.com/the-ideal-running-cadence-and-how-to-achieve-it/
  • goatg
    goatg Posts: 1,399 Member
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    cbihatt wrote: »
    I am in the minority, but I love my treadmill. I don’t use it exclusively (although I did start out that way), but I never find it boring or onerous to use. Sometimes it is a relief to hop on the treadmill because I seem to run faster on it, and there are no hills so it’s an easy run with little effort. Also I can read a book or watch a tv episode and I am done before I know it.


    It's evil how much slower you are outside than on the treadmill. A few years back I ran 30 miles on a treadmill, straight through...no joke.
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
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    allother94 wrote: »
    dewd2 wrote: »
    As a person who runs all the time, I also HATE running on a dreadmill. If that's all I had I'd probably give up. Get outside a few times. Even over winter I'll probably use the dreadmill only once or twice.

    Good luck.

    Dwed2, I’ve seen you post a number of times. Do you mind me asking what your weekly workout looks like?

    Right now I'm average about 30ish miles per week. My longest runs are anywhere from 8-15 miles. I'm just keeping the base until I start training again next year. I don't do any speedwork other than a few short races but I am doing hill workouts once or twice a week. I am also hitting the trails a bit more for variety (and I have a trail 'race' in January).

    My first 6-7 months of 2020 will be a bit if a hybrid. I'm running with Fleet Feet and training in their marathon program but won't be running a marathon. So I'll cut the 18 and 20 mile runs out and do shorter runs on those days. I'll probably start training for a mile sometime in June to be ready to blow out a lung in July (Harrisburg Mile). I should be up to over 40 miles per week at that point.

    Then I'll start training for Richmond. When I do I'll be following a plan from Jack Daniels called 2Q (as adapted by my coach who was one of Jack's runners back in the day). I'll be over 50 miles a week and be doing some serious speed work once a week.

    I'll continue to do my full body resistance training as well to hopefully avoid injury. I have a plan that focuses on core and glutes (as designed by my physical therapist).

    Feel free to follow me on Strava if you like. https://www.strava.com/athletes/14312272
  • allother94
    allother94 Posts: 588 Member
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    dewd2 wrote: »
    allother94 wrote: »
    dewd2 wrote: »
    As a person who runs all the time, I also HATE running on a dreadmill. If that's all I had I'd probably give up. Get outside a few times. Even over winter I'll probably use the dreadmill only once or twice.

    Good luck.

    Dwed2, I’ve seen you post a number of times. Do you mind me asking what your weekly workout looks like?

    Right now I'm average about 30ish miles per week. My longest runs are anywhere from 8-15 miles. I'm just keeping the base until I start training again next year. I don't do any speedwork other than a few short races but I am doing hill workouts once or twice a week. I am also hitting the trails a bit more for variety (and I have a trail 'race' in January).

    My first 6-7 months of 2020 will be a bit if a hybrid. I'm running with Fleet Feet and training in their marathon program but won't be running a marathon. So I'll cut the 18 and 20 mile runs out and do shorter runs on those days. I'll probably start training for a mile sometime in June to be ready to blow out a lung in July (Harrisburg Mile). I should be up to over 40 miles per week at that point.

    Then I'll start training for Richmond. When I do I'll be following a plan from Jack Daniels called 2Q (as adapted by my coach who was one of Jack's runners back in the day). I'll be over 50 miles a week and be doing some serious speed work once a week.

    I'll continue to do my full body resistance training as well to hopefully avoid injury. I have a plan that focuses on core and glutes (as designed by my physical therapist).

    Feel free to follow me on Strava if you like. https://www.strava.com/athletes/14312272

    Do you try to win your races, or is it more of a “finishing is winning” type thing. If the first, how do you do?
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    edited December 2019
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    allother94 wrote: »
    dewd2 wrote: »
    allother94 wrote: »
    dewd2 wrote: »
    As a person who runs all the time, I also HATE running on a dreadmill. If that's all I had I'd probably give up. Get outside a few times. Even over winter I'll probably use the dreadmill only once or twice.

    Good luck.

    Dwed2, I’ve seen you post a number of times. Do you mind me asking what your weekly workout looks like?

    Right now I'm average about 30ish miles per week. My longest runs are anywhere from 8-15 miles. I'm just keeping the base until I start training again next year. I don't do any speedwork other than a few short races but I am doing hill workouts once or twice a week. I am also hitting the trails a bit more for variety (and I have a trail 'race' in January).

    My first 6-7 months of 2020 will be a bit if a hybrid. I'm running with Fleet Feet and training in their marathon program but won't be running a marathon. So I'll cut the 18 and 20 mile runs out and do shorter runs on those days. I'll probably start training for a mile sometime in June to be ready to blow out a lung in July (Harrisburg Mile). I should be up to over 40 miles per week at that point.

    Then I'll start training for Richmond. When I do I'll be following a plan from Jack Daniels called 2Q (as adapted by my coach who was one of Jack's runners back in the day). I'll be over 50 miles a week and be doing some serious speed work once a week.

    I'll continue to do my full body resistance training as well to hopefully avoid injury. I have a plan that focuses on core and glutes (as designed by my physical therapist).

    Feel free to follow me on Strava if you like. https://www.strava.com/athletes/14312272

    Do you try to win your races, or is it more of a “finishing is winning” type thing. If the first, how do you do?

    I don't have the speed required to win big races but I am competitive in my age group at most events. I generally finish in the top 10%, but that's not really my goal. I am mostly competing with myself. My goal is to always get faster. At my age that is not easy but since I never really competed (I have been running for 30 years but never seriously until recently) I have room to improve.

    Checkout ATHLINKS - https://www.athlinks.com/athletes/315954485 - It is not complete but it's pretty good at tracking major races.

    Edit to add: Don't assume I was 'racing' everyone one of those events. Some I was just there to support a cause and others I was may have been injured. Results don't tell the full story and if you base your success on just results you are doing it wrong (IMO of course).
  • 4newrunner
    4newrunner Posts: 85 Member
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    I ran my first 5K in May 2018 and have been addicted ever since....I always hated running....never understood it...I would see people sucking wind at stoplights in extreme heat and cold......I used to go on long walks on the weekends....9-10K ....then I got a Fitbit for my Bday...some people introduced me to C25K....took me a couple of times to really get into it. I finally reached the point where I could run 5K non-stop on the treadmill. Then I started running outside and we all know how great of a difference that is. I reached the point where I could run 5K non-stop outside.....googled a local 5K race and signed up to create a benchmark of where I was fitness-wise. It was an amazing feeling coming up to the finish line having people cheer you on....crossing the finish line and receiving a medal was a life-changing moment for me. I have ran races in different distances....5K, 10K, 10 Milers, Half-marathons. I'm not a fast runner, but I enjoy every moment. The running community is an amazing network of people, regardless of level or experience.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
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    4newrunner wrote: »
    I ran my first 5K in May 2018 and have been addicted ever since....I always hated running....never understood it...I would see people sucking wind at stoplights in extreme heat and cold......I used to go on long walks on the weekends....9-10K ....then I got a Fitbit for my Bday...some people introduced me to C25K....took me a couple of times to really get into it. I finally reached the point where I could run 5K non-stop on the treadmill. Then I started running outside and we all know how great of a difference that is. I reached the point where I could run 5K non-stop outside.....googled a local 5K race and signed up to create a benchmark of where I was fitness-wise. It was an amazing feeling coming up to the finish line having people cheer you on....crossing the finish line and receiving a medal was a life-changing moment for me. I have ran races in different distances....5K, 10K, 10 Milers, Half-marathons. I'm not a fast runner, but I enjoy every moment. The running community is an amazing network of people, regardless of level or experience.

    This is close to my experience. I am not a fast runner and until I began racing, I thought running was -- at best -- "just okay." Once I discovered racing and the running community, it became much more fun. Now even solitary "boring" workouts have their place in my training plan and are fun. It's not for everyone, but racing is a huge motivator for me.
  • Girlheidi
    Girlheidi Posts: 60 Member
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    4newrunner wrote: »
    I ran my first 5K in May 2018 and have been addicted ever since....I always hated running....never understood it...I would see people sucking wind at stoplights in extreme heat and cold......I used to go on long walks on the weekends....9-10K ....then I got a Fitbit for my Bday...some people introduced me to C25K....took me a couple of times to really get into it. I finally reached the point where I could run 5K non-stop on the treadmill. Then I started running outside and we all know how great of a difference that is. I reached the point where I could run 5K non-stop outside.....googled a local 5K race and signed up to create a benchmark of where I was fitness-wise. It was an amazing feeling coming up to the finish line having people cheer you on....crossing the finish line and receiving a medal was a life-changing moment for me. I have ran races in different distances....5K, 10K, 10 Milers, Half-marathons. I'm not a fast runner, but I enjoy every moment. The running community is an amazing network of people, regardless of level or experience.

    This is close to my experience. I am not a fast runner and until I began racing, I thought running was -- at best -- "just okay." Once I discovered racing and the running community, it became much more fun. Now even solitary "boring" workouts have their place in my training plan and are fun. It's not for everyone, but racing is a huge motivator for me.

    #metoo.
    Did couch 25k. Synced Fitbit now Garmin to MFP. Started doing Parkruns.
    I hated running because I was rubbish at it but as I have got fitter and stronger I actually quite like it. I love the results and the sense of achievement when I finish a 5k.
    Another runner commented that I had got faster last week; real motivation for me.
    I know I am stronger and healthier and my cardio vascular health is improved....
    I am still waiting for a runners' high ....but I do quite enjoy it 😁
  • moonangel12
    moonangel12 Posts: 971 Member
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    Girlheidi wrote: »
    I hated running because I was rubbish at it but as I have got fitter and stronger I actually quite like it. I love the results and the sense of achievement when I finish a 5k.
    Another runner commented that I had got faster last week; real motivation for me.
    I know I am stronger and healthier and my cardio vascular health is improved....
    I am still waiting for a runners' high ....but I do quite enjoy it 😁
    I posted about a really good run I had a few weeks ago and someone pointed out that I had experienced a “runners high” - I am not hugely involved in a running community or anything, had heard the term before but always thought it was the general mood lift you would get after a run. NOW I understand! It was a wonderful feeling! I had been adjusting my stride for about a year and a half, picked running back up August 2018 after a health scare and quickly had horrendous shin splints. Old shoes + ridiculous heel strike = OUCH! I would find it every now and then, but then think too hard about it and lose it. That night? I felt like I could run forever! It was amazing! Haven’t been able to replicate it though, which is a bummer.

  • Jenpiddles
    Jenpiddles Posts: 44 Member
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    I started running earlier this year.
    1. Run outdoors with music! It's so much better than a treadmill, and it's a better workout.
    2. Get fitted for running shoes at a running shop. Well worth the investment!
    3. Listen to your body and don't run through pain! I learned this the hard way... 😣

    I'm recovering from a stress fracture in my pelvis currently. I haven't run in 6 weeks now, actually, I havent done much of anything and it's killing me. I had some pain while running for a couple of months, and I foolishly kept going. My best advice to you is take pain seriously. I was not overtraining (only running 3mi 3days a week), and I have no health issues that contributed to the fracture. From what the ortho has said, these fractures are rare and notoriously hard to heal completely and it can take up to a year. Don't follow in those footsteps. A small setback for a minor injury is worth it!
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,682 Member
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    Jenpiddles - sorry you're going through this. I had the same problem my first year running, from doing too much too soon. It took about 7 months to heal completely. The good news is I went on to run 6 half marathons and 5 marathons in the years after the sfx healed.
  • phinners
    phinners Posts: 524 Member
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    I love the treadmill, I honestly hate running outside. The roads and pavements are so shoddy ive already fallen into the road and an oncoming car once. Im not going back outside again. The gyms I go to have treadmills with youtube, scenes running through towns etc, and I find those really push me.
    I do the virtual runner races too, Ive got a stack of medals that i love seeing. Ive ran and cycled various distances from 1 mile up to a half marathon on the static bike and a 10k outside biking. But Im defo an inside girl, I also like to use the other machines too so everything I need is right there. But so many people tell me to run outside and quite honestly no thank you I really dont like it. But they always think they know better than I do just because they like what they like and think us treadmillers are doing it wrong somehow. But until they pay my membership they dont get to have a say :)
  • Jenpiddles
    Jenpiddles Posts: 44 Member
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    Jenpiddles - sorry you're going through this. I had the same problem my first year running, from doing too much too soon. It took about 7 months to heal completely. The good news is I went on to run 6 half marathons and 5 marathons in the years after the sfx healed.

    Thank you! It's very frustrating. I wasn't overtraining at all, I did the C25k program and was only running 3 miles, 3 days a week when I got the fracture. After numerous blood tests and a bone scan, I have no answer as to why it happened. I plan on trying again in a few months. For now, I'm rowing and hoping not to loose all that I gained this year. Thank you for the motivating words!
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
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    I'm lazy. And get winded easily. I know I need to work up to endurance. ATM I walk on my treadmill, 30 minutes most days, at 4.1 mph. How do I get from that point to running? Intermittent running/walking until I build up? I've tried slowly running, like at 5 mph but cannot keep that pace up for even a count of 100 without thinking I'm gonna drop. I need to try harder. :/
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 6,183 Member
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    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    ATM I walk on my treadmill, 30 minutes most days, at 4.1 mph. How do I get from that point to running? Intermittent running/walking until I build up? I've tried slowly running, like at 5 mph but cannot keep that pace up for even a count of 100 without thinking I'm gonna drop. I need to try harder. :/

    Go slower! I'm a beginner, I jog at 3.9 miles per hour. Yes, seems ridiculously slow, but I can now keep that up for more than half an hour, after starting with walk/run intervals.
    The C25K program is great.
  • littlegreenparrot1
    littlegreenparrot1 Posts: 694 Member
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    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    I'm lazy. And get winded easily. I know I need to work up to endurance. ATM I walk on my treadmill, 30 minutes most days, at 4.1 mph. How do I get from that point to running? Intermittent running/walking until I build up? I've tried slowly running, like at 5 mph but cannot keep that pace up for even a count of 100 without thinking I'm gonna drop. I need to try harder. :/

    Have a look at the Couch to 5k program. There are lots of versions, but here in the UK the NHS one is often recommended.

    It works up gradually with run/walk intervals until you can run the distance. Go as slow as you need to and just follow the program, repeat a session or week if you need to.
    Stick with it, after a few weeks you feel less like you're going to keel over 😆

    Don't worry about speed, that will come later. Or not, it's a good day for me if I manage 11min miles, it doesn't have to matter unless you want it to.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
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    Couch to 5K program, will check that out, thanks!! I walked 26 min., this a.m. at 4.2 and incorporated 2 30 second jogs at 4.7 mph. Trouble is I don't have the patience to get past all the beginning *kitten* and work up to that 5K. :/ You'd think I'd know better by now(practice what you preach Reenie!!)
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,682 Member
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    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    I'm lazy. And get winded easily. I know I need to work up to endurance. ATM I walk on my treadmill, 30 minutes most days, at 4.1 mph. How do I get from that point to running? Intermittent running/walking until I build up? I've tried slowly running, like at 5 mph but cannot keep that pace up for even a count of 100 without thinking I'm gonna drop. I need to try harder. :/

    When you're on the TM, gradually increase the pace from 4.1 to 4.2 to 4.3 etc. At some point, it will be fast enough that you have to jog to keep up. Do that for one minute, then go back to 4.0 or less for a minute or two. Then go back to that jogging pace and try another minute. Then go back to a walk again. Gradually increase the time you spend jogging. Don't worry that you aren't going much faster than you walk. Some people actually run more slowly than they can walk. Your pace will improve as you run more. There's no hurry.