Noom

sunshinedaydream21
sunshinedaydream21 Posts: 62 Member
edited January 2020 in Health and Weight Loss
Has anyone tried Noom for weight loss? I just signed up with a discount code which made it $92 for the year which seems like a good deal if it's at all useful...14 day trial so I can cancel if it stinks :)

[Edited by MFP Staff]

Replies

  • COGypsy
    COGypsy Posts: 1,160 Member
    My sister has lost nearly 50 pounds now using Noom and loves it. She says the CBT/coaching part of it has been key to helping her stay on track and not get lost in the "crazies" of weight loss like she has when she's tried dieting on her own.
  • sunshinedaydream21
    sunshinedaydream21 Posts: 62 Member
    Thanks everyone for the thoughts. I’m not sure if I will go past the free trial period...I do like mfp for food diary. I was interested in the psychology part and the group mainly. Thanks!
  • ahoy_m8
    ahoy_m8 Posts: 3,052 Member
    I have not read a lot about CBT applied to food consumption, but I have read this: https://www.amazon.com/Beck-Diet-Solution-Train-Person/dp/0848731735/

    I found lots of helpful insights even if a bit repetitive. I checked it out from my local library.
  • jeagogo
    jeagogo Posts: 179 Member
    I think the cognitive therapy approach is interesting, and could be really helpful for folks who need help with their mindset regarding food. Sounds like there's also a community support layer to the program which could be helpful to.
    That said, I tried it and quit after 2 days because the food logging on their app was a total pain in the a** - no barcode scanning, a small library of foods, and a weird thing where you can't easily add foods to multiple meal times because when you exit a meal it kicks you back to the homepage instead of your daily food log. That last one was the dealbreaker for me. As much as we gripe about all of MFP's weird issues it's still so much more user friendly for tracking than I found Noom. I didn't get far enough in the program to get to the community portion to make any judgement on that.
    If what you are interested in is the cognitive therapy approach to weight loss I recommend checking out whether your healthcare provider has options available. I know mine offers low cost (cheaper than Noom) group therapy sessions and a lot of other support related to weight loss.
  • dujennifer
    dujennifer Posts: 162 Member
    I tried Noom. The mindset concept is cool, but I could not handle the excess amounts of notifications, daily tasks, multiple areas to log, etc. Their food logging database was very slim too. Nothing like this site where you can find just about anything. I ended up cancelling because it was just way too much. However, I imagine for some, the excessive communication and tracking/updates probably keeps you more accountable.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,876 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Here is my favorite post from previous Noom threads:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10759219/mfp-vs-noom
    I wrote this on a previous post about the topic, sharing it here...

    I used Noom to get back on track with weight loss two years after my last soiree with MFP. I signed up for the 2 week free trial and canceled it before the trial ended because I had read some reviews that made me a little suspicious of their customer service practices and because logging food in the app was so tedious. Their database isn't nearly as large as MFPs and they make you scroll so much to get the right amounts (e.g.: scrolling slowly from 1 to 300 if something is 300 grams).

    I continued with Noom through the free version of the app because I found the daily behavior modification articles very motivating and the quizzes/challenges were fun. Once you cancel, the app reverts to the free version and you can still read all the articles and quizzes. I was really motivated by getting the little check mark that said I read all the articles and competed my daily check in. Truth be told, the articles get significantly worse after about 2.5 months.

    With the free version, I didn't have access to the recipes, personal coach, or group chats, but I found ways around this. I have accountability through my partner at home who is also on a fitness journey and I found that the MFP forums give me all the "group" accountability I need. It's enough to check into these forums and remember I'm not doing this alone and plenty of posters here have similar questions that I have and are seeking support. I sought out recipe recommendations through my Fitbit community and through Facebook groups I was a part of.

    All in all, I found the free version of Noom useful for it's daily psychology-based behavior modification articles. I learned a lot about myself and lost ~15 pounds (half my goal weight). Throughout the time I was using the free version of Noom for the articles, I used MFP to track calories because Noom's calorie tracker is awful and I used the MFP forums to stay "connected" and feel supported. After I was done with all the articles (after 4 months) I just stuck with MFP beacuse by that point logging and reading MFP articles and forums had become a daily habit too. Their whole program is CICO + behavior modification. MFP is good at the first, but behavior mod is incidental. Noom is better at the latter. For me, using both gave me the best of both apps.

    I saved $180 by doing it this way. It may not be the way that works for everyone, but it worked for me. I credit Noom for motivating me in the beginning with the kinds of articles that you can't find on MFP, helping me stick to this journey for 4 consecutive months, and now in entering my 6th month without Noom. It's definitely an excellent tool for creating new habits and learning about your relationship with food...which is the whole point of the program.

    I found Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques very helpful when I had a problem with alcohol back in the 90s and have been meaning to check out Noom for this aspect.

    I might have to check that out.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,893 Member
    edited January 2020
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Here is my favorite post from previous Noom threads:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10759219/mfp-vs-noom
    I wrote this on a previous post about the topic, sharing it here...

    I used Noom to get back on track with weight loss two years after my last soiree with MFP. I signed up for the 2 week free trial and canceled it before the trial ended because I had read some reviews that made me a little suspicious of their customer service practices and because logging food in the app was so tedious. Their database isn't nearly as large as MFPs and they make you scroll so much to get the right amounts (e.g.: scrolling slowly from 1 to 300 if something is 300 grams).

    I continued with Noom through the free version of the app because I found the daily behavior modification articles very motivating and the quizzes/challenges were fun. Once you cancel, the app reverts to the free version and you can still read all the articles and quizzes. I was really motivated by getting the little check mark that said I read all the articles and competed my daily check in. Truth be told, the articles get significantly worse after about 2.5 months.

    With the free version, I didn't have access to the recipes, personal coach, or group chats, but I found ways around this. I have accountability through my partner at home who is also on a fitness journey and I found that the MFP forums give me all the "group" accountability I need. It's enough to check into these forums and remember I'm not doing this alone and plenty of posters here have similar questions that I have and are seeking support. I sought out recipe recommendations through my Fitbit community and through Facebook groups I was a part of.

    All in all, I found the free version of Noom useful for it's daily psychology-based behavior modification articles. I learned a lot about myself and lost ~15 pounds (half my goal weight). Throughout the time I was using the free version of Noom for the articles, I used MFP to track calories because Noom's calorie tracker is awful and I used the MFP forums to stay "connected" and feel supported. After I was done with all the articles (after 4 months) I just stuck with MFP beacuse by that point logging and reading MFP articles and forums had become a daily habit too. Their whole program is CICO + behavior modification. MFP is good at the first, but behavior mod is incidental. Noom is better at the latter. For me, using both gave me the best of both apps.

    I saved $180 by doing it this way. It may not be the way that works for everyone, but it worked for me. I credit Noom for motivating me in the beginning with the kinds of articles that you can't find on MFP, helping me stick to this journey for 4 consecutive months, and now in entering my 6th month without Noom. It's definitely an excellent tool for creating new habits and learning about your relationship with food...which is the whole point of the program.

    I found Cognitive Behavioral Therapy techniques very helpful when I had a problem with alcohol back in the 90s and have been meaning to check out Noom for this aspect.

    I might have to check that out.

    If there are Smart Recovery meetings available to you, I highly recommend them! I'd take in-person meetings over online, but online is an option too.

    https://www.smartrecovery.org
  • brayrh
    brayrh Posts: 2 Member
    I have been doing Noom since the first of January. So far I like it and will continue to use thru my paid period. The articles and “psycholgy” they discuss have been very helpful in getting my mind prepared to tackle my goals and do so in a very positive way. I was fortunate enough to be placed in an active group with a great coach, but from talking to others this is not always the case. They do desparately need an updated and correct database for food. I started using MFP for that very reason. I like the combination of the two and feel Noom will help me get off to a good start and MFP will be my go to for long term goals and maintenance.
  • scooter262
    scooter262 Posts: 5 Member
    I did the trial, and then one month. I really liked it, and learned a lot of good stuff. I think it really helped me have a better relationship with food. MFP food tracking is definitely a lot better than Noom’s. I got a little tired of the coaching and rah-rah attitude, which is why I cancelled. That, and I felt they had already given me the tools I needed to lose weight.
  • MercuryForce
    MercuryForce Posts: 104 Member
    edited January 2020
    I don't have personal experience with it, but it worries me a little. I think the idea behind it is good, like setting goals and getting into the psychology of your eating habits. But, I keep seeing ads that pop up on Facebook and all the comments are like "I lost 10 lbs in 2 weeks!" and "I've been using it since Thanksgiving and lost 40 lbs" and Noom is in those comments cheering them on. I just feel like there is a lot of encouragement of unsustainable weight loss going on. I'd be interested to see if the program as whole is that way, or just their online ads.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,893 Member
    edited January 2020
    I don't have personal experience with it, but it worries me a little. I think the idea behind it is good, like setting goals and getting into the psychology of your eating habits. But, I keep seeing ads that pop up on Facebook and all the comments are like "I lost 10 lbs in 2 weeks!" and "I've been using it since Thanksgiving and lost 40 lbs" and Noom is in those comments cheering them on. I just feel like there is a lot of encouragement of unsustainable weight loss going on. I'd be interested to see if the program as whole is that way, or just their online ads.

    That is indeed a red flag.

    Interestingly, I'm listening to a podcast sponsored by Noom* (Food, We Need To Talk), and the "words from our sponsor" don't have this fast weight loss tone at all.

    Could be tailored to the audiences - this podcast is science-based and is produced by WBUR, an NPR station, vs FaceBook.

    * In this week's episode they mention that all of last year's podcasts were recorded before they knew Noom was going to be their sponsor.
  • MercuryForce
    MercuryForce Posts: 104 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I don't have personal experience with it, but it worries me a little. I think the idea behind it is good, like setting goals and getting into the psychology of your eating habits. But, I keep seeing ads that pop up on Facebook and all the comments are like "I lost 10 lbs in 2 weeks!" and "I've been using it since Thanksgiving and lost 40 lbs" and Noom is in those comments cheering them on. I just feel like there is a lot of encouragement of unsustainable weight loss going on. I'd be interested to see if the program as whole is that way, or just their online ads.

    That is indeed a red flag.

    Interestingly, I'm listening to a podcast sponsored by Noom* (Food, We Need To Talk), and the "words from our sponsor" don't have this fast weight loss tone at all.

    Could be tailored to the audiences - this podcast is science-based and is produced by WBUR, an NPR station, vs FaceBook.

    * In this week's episode they mention that all of last year's podcasts were recorded before they knew Noom was going to be their sponsor.

    It's entirely possible the comments are just some bots or an intern going through and putting some sort of encouraging comment on every post that mentions weight loss. But, it still is concerning that "I lose 5 lbs in seven days!" is treated as "wow, you're doing great! Keep up the good work" rather than the reception here that post would get of "That's great, but keep in mind a lot of that is probably water weight this early on. If that kind of loss keeps up, please adjust your calories".

    I know they probably can't really say that when they are trying to get people to buy their product. But, I also don't feel comfortable with them promoting a lb a day weight loss as a desirable thing.
  • fitoverfortymom
    fitoverfortymom Posts: 3,452 Member
    I tried it to see if I liked the extra support. I found the app itself very inflexible and cumbersome. I have an Android, so there was no recipe building feature, which is huge for me since I cook for my family. I like the idea of Noom and I can see how that guided approach and gamification may really work for some. Wasn't for me, but the methods were sound.
  • SchweddyGirl
    SchweddyGirl Posts: 244 Member
    I tried Noom a few months ago, and while I did like the psychology behind it and liked how it made losing weight feel like a game, I found it to be better geared towards individuals who are just starting out on their lifestyle changes. Like others, I found their lack of recipe building an issue for me. A number of the responses when talking to the coach seemed very robotic to me. While I am sure there are individuals who benefit greatly from Noom, it wasn't for me.
  • Jruzer
    Jruzer Posts: 3,501 Member
    I was mildly curious, so I tried out their online quiz. You know the kind of thing - "See if Noom is right for you!"

    The I came to the two questions below. Despite the weasel words "can have" or "can impact", I got a pseudoscience vibe. I noped the heck out of there.

    7awz4wqasu7e.jpg

  • searchgal1
    searchgal1 Posts: 7 Member
    I don't think the program itself hypes quick weight loss. You can set your speed, just like with MFP, and calories adjust accordingly. I lost 16 lbs in 4 months - so there was no rapid weight loss going on here. Everyone who commented on the food database and clunkiness of the app in logging are spot on. For me, it served a purpose to jump start life style changes. I'm continuing with MFP successfully, so I guess I learned something along the way.