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Not feeling hungry

gumbyisgrngumbyisgrn Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
Ok so I am back at it trying to lose weight and eat right. Hoping I can stick with it this time. I am a 5’7 female and currently weigh 200 pounds. I am currently set to lose 1.5 lbs a week which gives me 1310 calories a day to eat. I work out 5 times a week doing a mix of cardio and strength training. The problem I am having is I am finding it hard to even eat the 1300 calories a day as I usually feel very full by the time I get home. I am literally forcing myself to have a little dinner each night just to make sure I am eating enough. Has anyone else had this issue before? Maybe I’m doing something wrong?
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Replies

  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member
    gumbyisgrn wrote: »
    Ok so I am back at it trying to lose weight and eat right. Hoping I can stick with it this time. I am a 5’7 female and currently weigh 200 pounds. I am currently set to lose 1.5 lbs a week which gives me 1310 calories a day to eat. I work out 5 times a week doing a mix of cardio and strength training. The problem I am having is I am finding it hard to even eat the 1300 calories a day as I usually feel very full by the time I get home. I am literally forcing myself to have a little dinner each night just to make sure I am eating enough. Has anyone else had this issue before? Maybe I’m doing something wrong?

    Post a normal day of eating please.
  • gumbyisgrngumbyisgrn Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    I tried to screen shot my diary from today. Hope you can see it. Forced myself to eat dinner tonight as I have a few nights now.

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  • PAV8888PAV8888 Member Posts: 7,947 Member Member Posts: 7,947 Member
    As a cross check, when the tub finishes, it might be interesting to add up how much sour cream you've logged vs the total weight of sour cream in the tub. Same applies to cheese and any other higher calorie items you've used. Of course this would only work if you are the sole consumer of the products!

    I don't see any cooking oil/fats during the cooking process. You may want to double check on that. 1g for 1 Cal is a value I would expect for boneless, skinless, chicken breast and that would be a bit on the low side. Wouldn't your ground chicken be slightly more caloric than skinless chicken breast?

    While just under 500 Cal seems like a solid number for 280g of chicken strips, a look at a well known (at my neck of the woods) supermarket brand would bring the strips closer to 670 Cal. https://www.janesfoods.com/products/pub-style-chicken-strips-2/ Did your numbers come from your packaging?

    That said... I am having a hard time envisioning your breakfast and lunch being so filling that I would not want to have SOME dinner... why are you thinking you're so full / how is your current food different as compared to what you ate before? What sort of deficit are you trying to achieve?

  • gumbyisgrngumbyisgrn Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    I got overweight from eating a lot of *kitten* food! That’s why I’m confused now with this full feeling because i know how much I overate in the past. As far as for my food I use a food scale to weigh everything and for packed food I use what’s on the package. I have my calories set to lose 1.5 pounds a week through the MFP app
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member
    gumbyisgrn wrote: »
    I got overweight from eating a lot of *kitten* food! That’s why I’m confused now with this full feeling because i know how much I overate in the past. As far as for my food I use a food scale to weigh everything and for packed food I use what’s on the package. I have my calories set to lose 1.5 pounds a week through the MFP app

    I mirror @PAV8888 ideas, but add the though. If you are doing low carb, some people decrease calories restricting a macro nutrient. See Christopher Gardner's DIETFIT study of low carb vs low fat. Also, if you have suddenly increased protein intake, this could also lead to a reduction in calories. In multiple studies when protein has been increased to about 30% of tdee, in obese and overweight individuals, there is a spontaneous reduction in calories. Leading to the idea of Protein Leverage Hypothesis. You will notice in the DIETFIT study mentioned, while carbs and fats were radically different, protein intake was nearly identical.
    edited March 2020
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member
    lgfrie wrote: »
    According to everything I've read here, it turns out there are a lot of people who find themselves excessively full at the very beginning of a diet and ask on this forum how they could possibly eat all the way to their 1300/1400/1500 calorie quota each day, because a few carrots makes them feel stuffed etc.

    Later, they get ravenously hungry.

    Of course, they get responses like "how could you possibly have gotten to X pounds if you have no appetite!!" etc. Which is a fair question, if you think about it.

    I don't think anyone yet has a great explanation for this odd phenomenon. But in my opinion, many emotional things are going on at the beginning of a diet, such as a rush of enthusiasm, excitement or anticipation of great success, or maybe fear of failure. All of these involve adrenaline, which can be a serious appetite suppressant. I know for me, when I am stressed, upset, excited, and so on, my appetite vanishes, like some kind of fight or flight response to get me to stop fixating on food and worry about outrunning the mammoth. I had an acute anxiety episode many years ago and for like a month I couldn't sit still long enough to get any food into my mouth, and barely ate and couldn't, so there's an extreme example, but imagine a lower-key version of that occurring at the start of a diet. But that's just another 10-cent theory, who really knows why some people who have a history of overeating suddenly can't finish their food.

    But the one commonality to most of the threads around this issue is that the OP's appetite eventually returns, with a vengeance. To support my little pet theory, it seems to be right around the time - 3 weeks, a month - when the diet honeymoon usually ends, the long slog sets in, and therefore those synaptic chemicals that play with your head and suppress appetite have returned to normal. But anyway ...

    I suggest making it your business to eat all those calories everyday, hungry or not, so that when the hunger starts, you've developed good habits. I'm specifically talking about the habits of hitting your target calories, no higher and no lower. One great advantage of calorie counting is that you don't have to be a slave to hunger signals. As a calorie counter you are free to be a slave to the spreadsheet and simply ignore or overpower what your body seems to be saying at any one point in time as far as whether you're hungry or full. There is really nothing more weight loss-promoting you can do than develop the skill of hitting that number dead on, no matter what your stomach is complaining about that day.

    God, what I wouldn't give for one day of feeling so stuffed I couldn't finish my food. Actually, I've had that feeling, but only after eating ~ 7,000 calories. :o

    @lgfrie

    Have you checked out the volume eaters thread?
  • lgfrielgfrie Member, Premium Posts: 1,422 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,422 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    lgfrie wrote: »
    According to everything I've read here, it turns out there are a lot of people who find themselves excessively full at the very beginning of a diet and ask on this forum how they could possibly eat all the way to their 1300/1400/1500 calorie quota each day, because a few carrots makes them feel stuffed etc.

    Later, they get ravenously hungry.

    Of course, they get responses like "how could you possibly have gotten to X pounds if you have no appetite!!" etc. Which is a fair question, if you think about it.

    I don't think anyone yet has a great explanation for this odd phenomenon. But in my opinion, many emotional things are going on at the beginning of a diet, such as a rush of enthusiasm, excitement or anticipation of great success, or maybe fear of failure. All of these involve adrenaline, which can be a serious appetite suppressant. I know for me, when I am stressed, upset, excited, and so on, my appetite vanishes, like some kind of fight or flight response to get me to stop fixating on food and worry about outrunning the mammoth. I had an acute anxiety episode many years ago and for like a month I couldn't sit still long enough to get any food into my mouth, and barely ate and couldn't, so there's an extreme example, but imagine a lower-key version of that occurring at the start of a diet. But that's just another 10-cent theory, who really knows why some people who have a history of overeating suddenly can't finish their food.

    But the one commonality to most of the threads around this issue is that the OP's appetite eventually returns, with a vengeance. To support my little pet theory, it seems to be right around the time - 3 weeks, a month - when the diet honeymoon usually ends, the long slog sets in, and therefore those synaptic chemicals that play with your head and suppress appetite have returned to normal. But anyway ...

    I suggest making it your business to eat all those calories everyday, hungry or not, so that when the hunger starts, you've developed good habits. I'm specifically talking about the habits of hitting your target calories, no higher and no lower. One great advantage of calorie counting is that you don't have to be a slave to hunger signals. As a calorie counter you are free to be a slave to the spreadsheet and simply ignore or overpower what your body seems to be saying at any one point in time as far as whether you're hungry or full. There is really nothing more weight loss-promoting you can do than develop the skill of hitting that number dead on, no matter what your stomach is complaining about that day.

    God, what I wouldn't give for one day of feeling so stuffed I couldn't finish my food. Actually, I've had that feeling, but only after eating ~ 7,000 calories. :o

    @lgfrie

    Have you checked out the volume eaters thread?

    I have not, but you've got me intrigued and I will check it out.
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member
    lgfrie wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    lgfrie wrote: »
    According to everything I've read here, it turns out there are a lot of people who find themselves excessively full at the very beginning of a diet and ask on this forum how they could possibly eat all the way to their 1300/1400/1500 calorie quota each day, because a few carrots makes them feel stuffed etc.

    Later, they get ravenously hungry.

    Of course, they get responses like "how could you possibly have gotten to X pounds if you have no appetite!!" etc. Which is a fair question, if you think about it.

    I don't think anyone yet has a great explanation for this odd phenomenon. But in my opinion, many emotional things are going on at the beginning of a diet, such as a rush of enthusiasm, excitement or anticipation of great success, or maybe fear of failure. All of these involve adrenaline, which can be a serious appetite suppressant. I know for me, when I am stressed, upset, excited, and so on, my appetite vanishes, like some kind of fight or flight response to get me to stop fixating on food and worry about outrunning the mammoth. I had an acute anxiety episode many years ago and for like a month I couldn't sit still long enough to get any food into my mouth, and barely ate and couldn't, so there's an extreme example, but imagine a lower-key version of that occurring at the start of a diet. But that's just another 10-cent theory, who really knows why some people who have a history of overeating suddenly can't finish their food.

    But the one commonality to most of the threads around this issue is that the OP's appetite eventually returns, with a vengeance. To support my little pet theory, it seems to be right around the time - 3 weeks, a month - when the diet honeymoon usually ends, the long slog sets in, and therefore those synaptic chemicals that play with your head and suppress appetite have returned to normal. But anyway ...

    I suggest making it your business to eat all those calories everyday, hungry or not, so that when the hunger starts, you've developed good habits. I'm specifically talking about the habits of hitting your target calories, no higher and no lower. One great advantage of calorie counting is that you don't have to be a slave to hunger signals. As a calorie counter you are free to be a slave to the spreadsheet and simply ignore or overpower what your body seems to be saying at any one point in time as far as whether you're hungry or full. There is really nothing more weight loss-promoting you can do than develop the skill of hitting that number dead on, no matter what your stomach is complaining about that day.

    God, what I wouldn't give for one day of feeling so stuffed I couldn't finish my food. Actually, I've had that feeling, but only after eating ~ 7,000 calories. :o

    @lgfrie

    Have you checked out the volume eaters thread?

    I have not, but you've got me intrigued and I will check it out.

    If you have not checked out the volume eaters thread, do! The Godfather aka @justtomek, is an amazing volume cook!
    Yes, there are some people who have trouble eating at the start, but I see almost just as many who start and are ravenous! Those are just anecdotal at best. What we do have is research. Limited? Yes, but still has to be looked into. With what I stated above, there are other studies that might add to the equation of what drives us to eat and how much we eat. Barbara Rolls work on the calorie density, sensory specific satiety, and food sequencing is interesting. Studies on bland liquid diets affect on calorie intake obese individuals adds. Studies on rats made obese on an ad librium "western" diet and switched to an ad librium whole foods lower energy dense diet and lose weight and maintain it. Adds. Studies on pigs given a normal chow diet ad librium vs a paleo style diet and paleo diet pigs being leaner in the long term are interesting. Not pushing any dietary pattern btw. Kevin's halls most recent study of hyper processed vs less refined diet ad librium adds.
    Now the antidotes. If we look at what creatures are having a weight issues ,in general, we have humans, dogs, and cats. What do they have in common, they tend to live in human houses and eat human food. Look at a monkey from Thailand named Uncle Fat.... last antidote from me. Let's take pigs as an example. Outside of dogs, they were one of the first domesticated animals. They have been shaped by humans for the last 50k years. Outside of primates, they might be more like us than many other studied animals. I hunt feral/wild pigs. I have killed those raised in the wild and those who were domestics and went feral. I can tell a difference. The Pine wood rooters are lean. I mean lean. Thick hair and tusk. The ones that just recently went wild tend to be fatter with less dense hair and smaller tusk. Still leaning compared to standard domestics. Why? I think it's there diet and lifestyle. They move more and eat less dense foods. In my area, old orange groves and plentiful acorns add plenty of calories. Just my ramble...

    **edit** while animal studies are not equal to human studies. I do like the fact that animal studies take the "human" aspects out. Anxiety, enthusiasm, ect play virtually no roll on food intake. Just hunger and satiety.
    edited March 2020
  • lgfrielgfrie Member, Premium Posts: 1,422 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,422 Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    lgfrie wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    lgfrie wrote: »
    According to everything I've read here, it turns out there are a lot of people who find themselves excessively full at the very beginning of a diet and ask on this forum how they could possibly eat all the way to their 1300/1400/1500 calorie quota each day, because a few carrots makes them feel stuffed etc.

    Later, they get ravenously hungry.

    Of course, they get responses like "how could you possibly have gotten to X pounds if you have no appetite!!" etc. Which is a fair question, if you think about it.

    I don't think anyone yet has a great explanation for this odd phenomenon. But in my opinion, many emotional things are going on at the beginning of a diet, such as a rush of enthusiasm, excitement or anticipation of great success, or maybe fear of failure. All of these involve adrenaline, which can be a serious appetite suppressant. I know for me, when I am stressed, upset, excited, and so on, my appetite vanishes, like some kind of fight or flight response to get me to stop fixating on food and worry about outrunning the mammoth. I had an acute anxiety episode many years ago and for like a month I couldn't sit still long enough to get any food into my mouth, and barely ate and couldn't, so there's an extreme example, but imagine a lower-key version of that occurring at the start of a diet. But that's just another 10-cent theory, who really knows why some people who have a history of overeating suddenly can't finish their food.

    But the one commonality to most of the threads around this issue is that the OP's appetite eventually returns, with a vengeance. To support my little pet theory, it seems to be right around the time - 3 weeks, a month - when the diet honeymoon usually ends, the long slog sets in, and therefore those synaptic chemicals that play with your head and suppress appetite have returned to normal. But anyway ...

    I suggest making it your business to eat all those calories everyday, hungry or not, so that when the hunger starts, you've developed good habits. I'm specifically talking about the habits of hitting your target calories, no higher and no lower. One great advantage of calorie counting is that you don't have to be a slave to hunger signals. As a calorie counter you are free to be a slave to the spreadsheet and simply ignore or overpower what your body seems to be saying at any one point in time as far as whether you're hungry or full. There is really nothing more weight loss-promoting you can do than develop the skill of hitting that number dead on, no matter what your stomach is complaining about that day.

    God, what I wouldn't give for one day of feeling so stuffed I couldn't finish my food. Actually, I've had that feeling, but only after eating ~ 7,000 calories. :o

    @lgfrie

    Have you checked out the volume eaters thread?

    I have not, but you've got me intrigued and I will check it out.

    If you have not checked out the volume eaters thread, do! The Godfather aka @justtomek, is an amazing volume cook!
    Yes, there are some people who have trouble eating at the start, but I see almost just as many who start and are ravenous! Those are just anecdotal at best. What we do have is research. Limited? Yes, but still has to be looked into. With what I stated above, there are other studies that might add to the equation of what drives us to eat and how much we eat. Barbara Rolls work on the calorie density, sensory specific satiety, and food sequencing is interesting. Studies on bland liquid diets affect on calorie intake obese individuals adds. Studies on rats made obese on an ad librium "western" diet and switched to an ad librium whole foods lower energy dense diet and lose weight and maintain it. Adds. Studies on pigs given a normal chow diet ad librium vs a paleo style diet and paleo diet pigs being leaner in the long term are interesting. Not pushing any dietary pattern btw. Kevin's halls most recent study of hyper processed vs less refined diet ad librium adds.
    Now the antidotes. If we look at what creatures are having a weight issues ,in general, we have humans, dogs, and cats. What do they have in common, they tend to live in human houses and eat human food. Look at a monkey from Thailand named Uncle Fat.... last antidote from me. Let's take pigs as an example. Outside of dogs, they were one of the first domesticated animals. They have been shaped by humans for the last 50k years. Outside of primates, they might be more like us than many other studied animals. I hunt feral/wild pigs. I have killed those raised in the wild and those who were domestics and went feral. I can tell a difference. The Pine wood rooters are lean. I mean lean. Thick hair and tusk. The ones that just recently went wild tend to be fatter with less dense hair and smaller tusk. Still leaning compared to standard domestics. Why? I think it's there diet and lifestyle. They move more and eat less dense foods. In my area, old orange groves and plentiful acorns add plenty of calories. Just my ramble...

    **edit** while animal studies are not equal to human studies. I do like the fact that animal studies take the "human" aspects out. Anxiety, enthusiasm, ect play virtually no roll on food intake. Just hunger and satiety.

    Interesting. The ideas, not just the wild boar hunting, which sounds ... stressful. I imagine if I saw a wild boar I'd be exiting the area at warp speed.

    I have a real porker of a cat who'd be BMI stage III if they applied that metric to cats, but we don't feed her human food because she doesn't like it. She's strictly a canned cat food consumer, and that in only in 3 flavors. Doesn't like seafood of any type either, but that's a whole nother story. Anyway, human food can't be the answer because she doesn't get any. I think it's more the easy around the clock availability of food any time she feels like grazing, combined with the incredibly sedentary lifestyle of laying around a house and sleeping a lot, instead of getting out there and hunting. Which is to say, she leads the same life as her owners did until a year ago, with the same result.
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member
    Cat food is human food that is processed differently, isn't it?
  • try2againtry2again Member Posts: 3,560 Member Member Posts: 3,560 Member
    I am inclined to attribute this mostly to the honeymoon phase and possibly eating more calories than you realize due to not using a food scale.

    Regardless, I can pretty much guarantee in a few weeks you won't find 1300 calories to be "too much", assuming your logging is accurate. ;)
  • estherdragonbatestherdragonbat Member Posts: 5,285 Member Member Posts: 5,285 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    Cat food is human food that is processed differently, isn't it?

    Well, considering that to me, a main dish isn't a main dish if it doesn't have onions and/or garlic, both of which are toxic to cats, even if I weren't vegetarian, it wouldn't be MY human food.

    But it does need to be higher grade than dog food from what I've read. (Admittedly, I don't recall the source and I didn't vet it, so if I'm off, I'm open to being corrected.)
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member
    lgfrie wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    lgfrie wrote: »
    NovusDies wrote: »
    lgfrie wrote: »
    According to everything I've read here, it turns out there are a lot of people who find themselves excessively full at the very beginning of a diet and ask on this forum how they could possibly eat all the way to their 1300/1400/1500 calorie quota each day, because a few carrots makes them feel stuffed etc.

    Later, they get ravenously hungry.

    Of course, they get responses like "how could you possibly have gotten to X pounds if you have no appetite!!" etc. Which is a fair question, if you think about it.

    I don't think anyone yet has a great explanation for this odd phenomenon. But in my opinion, many emotional things are going on at the beginning of a diet, such as a rush of enthusiasm, excitement or anticipation of great success, or maybe fear of failure. All of these involve adrenaline, which can be a serious appetite suppressant. I know for me, when I am stressed, upset, excited, and so on, my appetite vanishes, like some kind of fight or flight response to get me to stop fixating on food and worry about outrunning the mammoth. I had an acute anxiety episode many years ago and for like a month I couldn't sit still long enough to get any food into my mouth, and barely ate and couldn't, so there's an extreme example, but imagine a lower-key version of that occurring at the start of a diet. But that's just another 10-cent theory, who really knows why some people who have a history of overeating suddenly can't finish their food.

    But the one commonality to most of the threads around this issue is that the OP's appetite eventually returns, with a vengeance. To support my little pet theory, it seems to be right around the time - 3 weeks, a month - when the diet honeymoon usually ends, the long slog sets in, and therefore those synaptic chemicals that play with your head and suppress appetite have returned to normal. But anyway ...

    I suggest making it your business to eat all those calories everyday, hungry or not, so that when the hunger starts, you've developed good habits. I'm specifically talking about the habits of hitting your target calories, no higher and no lower. One great advantage of calorie counting is that you don't have to be a slave to hunger signals. As a calorie counter you are free to be a slave to the spreadsheet and simply ignore or overpower what your body seems to be saying at any one point in time as far as whether you're hungry or full. There is really nothing more weight loss-promoting you can do than develop the skill of hitting that number dead on, no matter what your stomach is complaining about that day.

    God, what I wouldn't give for one day of feeling so stuffed I couldn't finish my food. Actually, I've had that feeling, but only after eating ~ 7,000 calories. :o

    @lgfrie

    Have you checked out the volume eaters thread?

    I have not, but you've got me intrigued and I will check it out.

    If you have not checked out the volume eaters thread, do! The Godfather aka @justtomek, is an amazing volume cook!
    Yes, there are some people who have trouble eating at the start, but I see almost just as many who start and are ravenous! Those are just anecdotal at best. What we do have is research. Limited? Yes, but still has to be looked into. With what I stated above, there are other studies that might add to the equation of what drives us to eat and how much we eat. Barbara Rolls work on the calorie density, sensory specific satiety, and food sequencing is interesting. Studies on bland liquid diets affect on calorie intake obese individuals adds. Studies on rats made obese on an ad librium "western" diet and switched to an ad librium whole foods lower energy dense diet and lose weight and maintain it. Adds. Studies on pigs given a normal chow diet ad librium vs a paleo style diet and paleo diet pigs being leaner in the long term are interesting. Not pushing any dietary pattern btw. Kevin's halls most recent study of hyper processed vs less refined diet ad librium adds.
    Now the antidotes. If we look at what creatures are having a weight issues ,in general, we have humans, dogs, and cats. What do they have in common, they tend to live in human houses and eat human food. Look at a monkey from Thailand named Uncle Fat.... last antidote from me. Let's take pigs as an example. Outside of dogs, they were one of the first domesticated animals. They have been shaped by humans for the last 50k years. Outside of primates, they might be more like us than many other studied animals. I hunt feral/wild pigs. I have killed those raised in the wild and those who were domestics and went feral. I can tell a difference. The Pine wood rooters are lean. I mean lean. Thick hair and tusk. The ones that just recently went wild tend to be fatter with less dense hair and smaller tusk. Still leaning compared to standard domestics. Why? I think it's there diet and lifestyle. They move more and eat less dense foods. In my area, old orange groves and plentiful acorns add plenty of calories. Just my ramble...

    **edit** while animal studies are not equal to human studies. I do like the fact that animal studies take the "human" aspects out. Anxiety, enthusiasm, ect play virtually no roll on food intake. Just hunger and satiety.

    Interesting. The ideas, not just the wild boar hunting, which sounds ... stressful. I imagine if I saw a wild boar I'd be exiting the area at warp speed.

    I have a real porker of a cat who'd be BMI stage III if they applied that metric to cats, but we don't feed her human food because she doesn't like it. She's strictly a canned cat food consumer, and that in only in 3 flavors. Doesn't like seafood of any type either, but that's a whole nother story. Anyway, human food can't be the answer because she doesn't get any. I think it's more the easy around the clock availability of food any time she feels like grazing, combined with the incredibly sedentary lifestyle of laying around a house and sleeping a lot, instead of getting out there and hunting. Which is to say, she leads the same life as her owners did until a year ago, with the same result.

    I can agree to some of this. Though, when we decrease the food calorie density, the result might be a little different. Animals are born with certain satiety measures built in. In the wild when there is an excess of calories, some animals will gain weight, but they don't become obese. They reproduce. One of the reasons feral pigs have gone crazy here. Good food supply and few natural predators. Anecdotal, a family members dog recently gained about 15lbs on a normal 40lb frame. She had started getting human food far more often and her owner started a night job, so they were less able to get her outside. We took off the human food. Let her have free access to a lower energy dense chow and I came over 2 times a day and took her outside. Well, she is back to her previous weight now. The exercise alone was not enough to burn that many calories. So what did it? Was she following a spread sheet to tell her how much to eat? Nope, natural satiety signals and a proper energy dense diet.
    try2again wrote: »
    I am inclined to attribute this mostly to the honeymoon phase and possibly eating more calories than you realize due to not using a food scale.

    Regardless, I can pretty much guarantee in a few weeks you won't find 1300 calories to be "too much", assuming your logging is accurate. ;)

    Some I think, but there may be other factors at play as well.

    **edit** let's make a connection here. When we look at bland liquid diet studies, we see a spontaneous reduction in calories in the obese while lean folks ate enough to maintain their weight. Now, these folks were given free access to this liquid. The rats in the study were given free access to a lower energy dense rat chow and a running wheel. The dog in question went from a diet of regular dog chow and large amounts and variety of energy dense human food to a free access less energy dense chow. Yes, I was surprised they made a diet dog food.🙄
    We look at hunter gathers, they may eat 200 various types of food in a year, but they have a few staples. Common theme. Variety. Think of this situation. I tell you, "have all the chicken, rice, and broccoli with no added fats, no extra seasoning, cooked the same way, you want." That's all you have for the next year. How much are you going to eat? 😉 while some folks may overeat, I suspect many will not. At least after a few days or weeks.
    edited March 2020
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member
    I guess I am re-trained to be the opposite. I only want small portions of calorie dense food normally because I cannot create the same level of fullness that I get with a ridiculous volume of lower calorie food. If there is such a thing as eating too many vegetables in a single meal I am probably at risk of whatever problem it creates.

    Over the last 2 years I have learned to crave fullness or perhaps over-fullness. I can see a 900ish calorie hamburger and my brain starts calculating how many servings of lower calorie food I could eat instead. I still eat hamburgers and other calorie dense food on occasion but it is usually after a bunch of vegetables so that the hamburger is enough to finish me off. It seldom works as well but sometimes I still want a hamburger. It just doesn't happen often anymore.

    ETA: A quick run down my diary and it appears I ate 6.4 pounds of food for lunch. Well I didn't weigh the 4 pieces of chocolate I ate so 6.4 + chocolate.
    edited March 2020
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,980 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I guess I am re-trained to be the opposite. I only want small portions of calorie dense food normally because I cannot create the same level of fullness that I get with a ridiculous volume of lower calorie food. If there is such a thing as eating too many vegetables in a single meal I am probably at risk of whatever problem it creates.

    Over the last 2 years I have learned to crave fullness or perhaps over-fullness. I can see a 900ish calorie hamburger and my brain starts calculating how many servings of lower calorie food I could eat instead. I still eat hamburgers and other calorie dense food on occasion but it is usually after a bunch of vegetables so that the hamburger is enough to finish me off. It seldom works as well but sometimes I still want a hamburger. It just doesn't happen often anymore.

    ETA: A quick run down my diary and it appears I ate 6.4 pounds of food for lunch. Well I didn't weigh the 4 pieces of chocolate I ate so 6.4 + chocolate.

    can see a 900ish calorie hamburger and my brain starts calculating how many servings of lower calorie food I could eat instead.

    That sir, is one of the reasons I think you will do great in maintenance. 6.4lbs for lunch as well? Sir, you are a volume eating Titan! Kinda jealous, i would explode!

    Last antidote. Growing up, my grandfather raised pigs. When we were about to slaughter or take some to auction, we needed to fatten them up. Now, they would gain some weight while locked in a pin and fed a diet of corn and soybean mash, but it was slow. So, a few weeks before the big day, we would separate the ones we were going to take. My grandfather would go to a Day old bread store. For those who dont know what that is, it's a place where grocery stores would send left over bread and confectionery items when they were about to go out of date. The store would sell them cheap. When they did go out of date or stale, they would put then racks in the back and you would buy them by the pallet basically for next to nothing. He would then visit a local dairy farm and buy spoiled or out of date whole milk. Those pigs would go ape "kitten" on that mix! They would eat until they would nearly explode and gain weight rapidly! It could be hundreds of extra $ at auction. Not sure if you can do that anymore with all the new health laws.
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8,872 Member
    It is an expensive WoE at restaurants though. It is fun to get the double takes when you order 2 entrees and multiple extra sides just for yourself. Then the question "Was part of that to go?" lol
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Member Posts: 7,947 Member Member Posts: 7,947 Member
    NovusDies wrote: »
    I guess I am re-trained to be the opposite. I only want small portions of calorie dense food normally because I cannot create the same level of fullness that I get with a ridiculous volume of lower calorie food. If there is such a thing as eating too many vegetables in a single meal I am probably at risk of whatever problem it creates.

    Over the last 2 years I have learned to crave fullness or perhaps over-fullness. I can see a 900ish calorie hamburger and my brain starts calculating how many servings of lower calorie food I could eat instead. I still eat hamburgers and other calorie dense food on occasion but it is usually after a bunch of vegetables so that the hamburger is enough to finish me off. It seldom works as well but sometimes I still want a hamburger. It just doesn't happen often anymore.

    Don't be surprised if over time you see some changes on this and just go with the flow and experiment.

    Most of the time I go for lower caloric density and higher volume. But yes, there have been a couple of times when I did the exact opposite. Fewer times and maybe for shorter periods of time. And I was very surprised when it did work (i.e. I wasn't hungry) in spite of the lower volume. But also this didn't happen till well into maintenance. First incident was 1400 Cal of whole foods carrot cake... not an appreciable volume in spite of the calories due to the inch thick icing... and it shocked me that I wasn't hungry for quite a while after :smiley:
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