Rounded nutrition advice?

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Hell all. I've been trying to lose weight to treat my nafld for almost 2 months. I started using this app 2 weeks ago to log food. I've opened my food log to public. I was a chef which has taught me all about fats and sauces and carbs and cheese... all things that generally work against weight loss. I have not a clue on how to build satisfying low carb low fat nutritious meals. Im worried that I'm not getting a rounded nutrition. This community seemed extremely knowledgeable so I was hoping yall could check out my food log and offer some advice regarding nutrition and food and maybe even recipes.. Please overlook my weak willed day at Arbys... at least I stayed honest and logged it lol!

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  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 34,146 Member
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    Just focus on good food logging for now.

    Since you're aware of the impact of sauces, cheese and oils, just use less of them. Nonfat Greek yogurt can be a good sub for sour cream. Less butter still tastes good. Same with less cheese and just a little more seasoning.

    You can't really go "low carb and low fat." Just try to stay within set macros. I use fat and protein as minimum goals to hit and carbs just fall where they fall.

    The defaults on this site are 50% Carbs, 30% Fats and 20% Protein. That is a good, common sense start point while you're getting the hand of logging.

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/1234699/logging-accurately-step-by-step-guide/p1
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,763 Member
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    So you've got some days that look appropriate caloriewise (I'm guessing) and other days that are way too low for a man.

    It looks like you're using a mixture of weighing, cups, and just plain guessing to determine how much you're eating. Weighing is generally the most accurate for solid food, while rough estimates (like 1 "medium" avocado) are going to tend to be the least accurate.

    If you're preparing your own food, you'll want to try to avoid using entries created by other people (like the "sauteed kale") to estimate it. It would be better to figure out how much oil you're using to saute and how much kale you're eating and log them individually (I understand this isn't always possible when you're eating food prepared by others).

    I would recommend getting comfortable with logging so you have a better idea of what you're actually eating and then proceed to make changes from there. Right now, what you've got is rough estimates.

    The Arby's you mentioned was five sandwiches. Was that in one sitting? That's a lot of food! (Not a negative judgment, I've also been known to eat lots of food at once). It might be useful to figure out what was going on with that. Were you incredibly hungry? Was it a choice to eat that much at once or did it feel like something that you weren't in control of? Was it possibly a situation where you feel like you aren't "supposed" to have Arby's anymore so once you decided to have one sandwich you felt like you had to get the others in because you weren't going to have it again for a long time? I ask because I found that getting to the bottom of stuff like that was really key for my personal weight management.
  • HeidiCooksSupper
    HeidiCooksSupper Posts: 3,831 Member
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    As a chef, you have an advantage. You know that experimenting and adding things to food can make them really delicious. Don't be afraid to add anything that fits in your calories. For example, riced cauliflower (I really like the Green Giant cauliflower "risotto") has very few calories and by itself lacks taste. I toss a tablespoon of prepared pesto in it. Yes, the pesto has more calories than the cauliflower it's dressing but who cares? The total number is less than an equivalent blob of mashed potatoes and gravy or even pasta with pesto. So, put your culinary might to work figuring out how to add taste to your food without going over on calories.

    My favorite source for information on how to eat a well-rounded diet is https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/

    Eating fat does not make you fat. Eating carboydrates doesn't either. Cholesterol in food generally does not affect your blood cholesterol. Consuming more calories than you burn causes weight gain. Eating fewer calories than you burn causes weight loss. It really is as simple as that. Calories in/calories out. CICO

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 28,028 Member
    edited August 2020
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    TSnowfire wrote: »
    Hell all. I've been trying to lose weight to treat my nafld for almost 2 months. I started using this app 2 weeks ago to log food. I've opened my food log to public. I was a chef which has taught me all about fats and sauces and carbs and cheese... all things that generally work against weight loss. I have not a clue on how to build satisfying low carb low fat nutritious meals. Im worried that I'm not getting a rounded nutrition. This community seemed extremely knowledgeable so I was hoping yall could check out my food log and offer some advice regarding nutrition and food and maybe even recipes.. Please overlook my weak willed day at Arbys... at least I stayed honest and logged it lol!

    What gave you the impression you need to be low carb for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease? A quick google says to eat more plants, which are inherently carby. Has your doctor referred you to a dietitian?

    I'm wondering if the recommendation to reduce fat from the second link is just to make it easier to create a calorie deficit.

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20354573

    Lifestyle and home remedies

    With your doctor's help, you can take steps to control your nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. You can:
    • Lose weight. If you're overweight or obese, reduce the number of calories you eat each day and increase your physical activity in order to lose weight. Calorie reduction is the key to losing weight and managing this disease. If you have tried to lose weight in the past and have been unsuccessful, ask your doctor for help.
    • Choose a healthy diet. Eat a healthy diet that's rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and keep track of all calories you take in.
    • Exercise and be more active. Aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week. If you're trying to lose weight, you might find that more exercise is helpful. But if you don't already exercise regularly, get your doctor's OK first and start slowly.
    • Control your diabetes. Follow your doctor's instructions to stay in control of your diabetes. Take your medications as directed and closely monitor your blood sugar.
    • Lower your cholesterol. A healthy plant-based diet, exercise and medications can help keep your cholesterol and your triglycerides at healthy levels.
    • Protect your liver. Avoid things that will put extra stress on your liver. For instance, don't drink alcohol. Follow the instructions on all medications and over-the-counter drugs. Check with your doctor before using any herbal remedies, as not all herbal products are safe.

    https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/liver-disease/nafld-nash/eating-diet-nutrition
  • changing4life
    changing4life Posts: 193 Member
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