One diet doesn’t fit all - new research!

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The New Scientist has just published some research into the effect of food on blood sugar levels (it’s behind a paywall so I can’t insert a hyperlink, but you can get a synopsis if you google it). In a nutshell, the researchers were surprised to find big variations in different individuals for the same food, and included diabetics and non-diabetics in their research. Kind of backs up what many of us have found anecdotally about whether we find high carb or high fat diets personally satisfying. They’re basically saying that eating a varied diet and getting all your fruit and veggies is still important, but for some people high carb could be really bad for sugar levels and for others it would be fine (even for some diabetics). I’ve summarised that badly, but it is a really interesting article for those who want to read more about current scientific research into nutrition.

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  • durhammfp
    durhammfp Posts: 493 Member
    edited September 2020
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    Here's the link for people who can view it: https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg24732990-600-why-there-is-no-such-thing-as-a-healthy-diet-that-works-for-everyone/

    Some people may have institutional (e.g. university) access directly or through a portal such as https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0262407920315876?via=ihub
  • HeidiCooksSupper
    HeidiCooksSupper Posts: 3,831 Member
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    Here's a "second" for New Scientist. We get it on paper -- yes, it's expensive -- but it is our bathroom reading. It basically keeps us abreast of current research and developments on a wide range of topics. Comes out of Britain but coverage is international. I say "we" because hubby and I both read it and pick and choose different articles. I, for example, pay more attention to behavioral and anthropological articles and skip the cosmology and other aspects of physics. He would probably read a number theory article I'd skip. I particularly like the running coverage of "nominative determinism" (where one's last name fits one's line of work or research) in the "Last Words" humorous column. We used to have two financial advisors named Mr. Moneypenny and Mr. Profitt. Sadly, our current advisor has a non-financial name.
  • claireychn074
    claireychn074 Posts: 1,389 Member
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    @HeidiCooksSupper I get the paper copy too - I have access through work but I just like reading the paper version. The Last Word is my favourite section - some of the info in there is hilarious!
  • cathipa
    cathipa Posts: 2,991 Member
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    I couldn't read the entire article, however Precision Nutrition has sponsored their data so there is some conflict of interest with their studies that could skew the results. I agree there is no one size fits all, but this seems to be promoting a coaching plan and not new revolutionary data.
  • fuzzylop_
    fuzzylop_ Posts: 100 Member
    edited September 2020
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    Precision Nutrition is a general term, not related to the company afaik. However, Spector is a consultant for ZOE Global, which is trying to commercialize this stuff via testing kits and an app (and is primarily behind the research). The findings are from predict-1 I believe. You can get some more non-paywalled details from:

    https://www.slideshare.net/SaraGordon3/predict-study-asn-presentation-june-2020
  • durhammfp
    durhammfp Posts: 493 Member
    edited September 2020
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    Also, here is a link to the recent peer-reviewed research that prompted the New Scientist article: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-020-0934-0

    And another study cited by New Scientist along the same lines: https://www.nature.com/articles/s43016-020-0092-z