Are eggs good for you 🤔

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Replies

  • Aimeesdiet
    Aimeesdiet Posts: 24 Member
    edited September 2020
    Hey thanks everyone for the insight, also yes I meant unsaturated sorry 😂 I thought they were bad because myfitnesspal recommended that I get none! (poly/mono unsaturated) but as you can probably tell I know nothing about them! Research time for me
  • nanastaci2020
    nanastaci2020 Posts: 1,072 Member
    Yes - I sprinkle a dash of salt after boiling & peeling them. I also put salt on watermelon, cucumbers, tomatoes, jasmine rice.

    I have a history of high blood pressure & heart issues in my family but I am SUPER fortunate that my own is very healthy. Giving up salt would be hard for me!
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,307 Member
    I eat 4 eggs a day. Have yet to suffer from any side effects. Well maybe except how my farts smell.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • BahstenB10
    BahstenB10 Posts: 227 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    I eat 4 eggs a day. Have yet to suffer from any side effects. Well maybe except how my farts smell.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Egg farts > turkey farts. Both bad but egg farts take the cake.
  • nooshi713
    nooshi713 Posts: 4,842 Member
    They are actually very good for you. Great source of protein. I eat mostly plant based (for the animals) but eggs are one of the few animal products I still eat sometimes. Also, most people aren’t sensitive to dietary cholesterol so you don’t have to worry about them affecting cholesterol levels too much if you stick to two a day.
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,456 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Aimeesdiet wrote: »
    Hey thanks everyone for the insight, also yes I meant unsaturated sorry 😂 I thought they were bad because myfitnesspal recommended that I get none! (poly/mono unsaturated) but as you can probably tell I know nothing about them! Research time for me

    No, MFP really doesn't recommend that you get none. The reason it looks like it does is a piece of dumb-itude.

    There isn't a standard, accepted goal for how much monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat you should get. The only "limit" is that you should stay within reasonable overall calories if you want to have reasonable bodyweight, and you need some other nutrients in those calories (protein, micronutrients, etc.). Otherwise, you can eat all the mono/poly unsaturated fats you wish, as far as anyone knows.

    MFP put them in the database because some people like to track them. Since there's no generally-accepted goal amount for best nutrition, it put zero in the goal. It really should just say N/A in goal or something like that, and I believe folks have sggested it, but no go.

    They don't mean to recommend that you get zero mono/polyunsaturated fats, truly. You can edit and put in a goal of your own, if you want.

    Yes to all this. Plus one further point: polyunsaturated fats are the source of all essential fatty acids (the ones your body can't produce on its own), but given the major challenge you would face in trying to determine whether the food you're eating contains enough EFAs, you're probably just better off choosing fat sources that are good PUFA sources over other fat sources when you can and when you don't have a particular reason to choose a fat that has more MUFAs or sats, such as the taste profile of the dish or the need for a more solid fat for the texture of the dish. (Pretty much all fat sources are a mix of PUFAs, MUFAs, and sats, so I can't just say choose PUFAs. Choose fats that have relatively more PUFAs.)

    Given that PUFAs are the one type of fat you absolutely need, it makes MFP stupid 0 default for PUFAs even stupider.
  • Dante_80
    Dante_80 Posts: 363 Member
    edited September 2020
    Eggs (and specifically, egg yolks) used to get a bad rap in the past due to incomplete research about how dietary cholesterol affects our body. However, a solid body of research shows that for most people, cholesterol in food has a smaller effect on blood levels of total cholesterol and harmful LDL cholesterol than does the mix of fats in our diet.

    This doesn't mean btw that you should go wild with them daily, as further research (1),(2),(3) shows that there is indeed a positive trend between very frequent (>1 per day) consumption of whole eggs and coronary heart disease, among other problems. Also, a subset of the population is sensitive to dietary cholesterol intake, meaning that it affects their blood cholesterol a lot more. So, if you do have heart or HC problems it might make sense to temper your intake of dietary cholesterol - or/and check out if you are sensitive to it. As with most things in life, moderation is key.

    Generally speaking, eggs are an extremely nutritious food, rich in Protein, Choline, Biotin – Vitamin B7, Vitamin A and antioxidants like lutein and zeaxanthin. Eggs are easy to eat, well-tolerated by young and old, adaptable to any meal, and inexpensive.

    So, to answer the OP, YES, eggs are definitely good for you! Personally I eat one per day, and I love them.
  • Aimeesdiet
    Aimeesdiet Posts: 24 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Aimeesdiet wrote: »
    Hey thanks everyone for the insight, also yes I meant unsaturated sorry 😂 I thought they were bad because myfitnesspal recommended that I get none! (poly/mono unsaturated) but as you can probably tell I know nothing about them! Research time for me

    No, MFP really doesn't recommend that you get none. The reason it looks like it does is a piece of dumb-itude.

    There isn't a standard, accepted goal for how much monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat you should get. The only "limit" is that you should stay within reasonable overall calories if you want to have reasonable bodyweight, and you need some other nutrients in those calories (protein, micronutrients, etc.). Otherwise, you can eat all the mono/poly unsaturated fats you wish, as far as anyone knows.

    MFP put them in the database because some people like to track them. Since there's no generally-accepted goal amount for best nutrition, it put zero in the goal. It really should just say N/A in goal or something like that, and I believe folks have sggested it, but no go.

    They don't mean to recommend that you get zero mono/polyunsaturated fats, truly. You can edit and put in a goal of your own, if you want.

    Okay thanks that's good to know cause I thought they were really bad cause I noticed if you eat fast food you get some, so every time I got some I was like UH oh
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    Aimeesdiet wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Aimeesdiet wrote: »
    Hey thanks everyone for the insight, also yes I meant unsaturated sorry 😂 I thought they were bad because myfitnesspal recommended that I get none! (poly/mono unsaturated) but as you can probably tell I know nothing about them! Research time for me

    No, MFP really doesn't recommend that you get none. The reason it looks like it does is a piece of dumb-itude.

    There isn't a standard, accepted goal for how much monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat you should get. The only "limit" is that you should stay within reasonable overall calories if you want to have reasonable bodyweight, and you need some other nutrients in those calories (protein, micronutrients, etc.). Otherwise, you can eat all the mono/poly unsaturated fats you wish, as far as anyone knows.

    MFP put them in the database because some people like to track them. Since there's no generally-accepted goal amount for best nutrition, it put zero in the goal. It really should just say N/A in goal or something like that, and I believe folks have sggested it, but no go.

    They don't mean to recommend that you get zero mono/polyunsaturated fats, truly. You can edit and put in a goal of your own, if you want.

    Okay thanks that's good to know cause I thought they were really bad cause I noticed if you eat fast food you get some, so every time I got some I was like UH oh

    Monounsaturated fat is found in oils like canola, peanut, olive, and sesame. Polyunsaturated fat is found in oils as well as foods like salmon and some nuts. If you're not seeing them when you log these foods, it's because you're choosing database entries that don't include that information, not because they're somehow exclusive to fast foods.
  • Sakura_Tree
    Sakura_Tree Posts: 142 Member
    Cholesterol is essential for good health. Eggs are one of the best things you can consume.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    Cholesterol is essential for good health. Eggs are one of the best things you can consume.

    Cholesterol is essential, but an important point is that our livers can produce all that we need even if we don't consume it.

  • VeryKatie
    VeryKatie Posts: 5,867 Member
    yes. They are for most people. Dietary cholesterol is not the same as blood cholesterol.
  • Treblesmama
    Treblesmama Posts: 11 Member
    maggiepz wrote: »
    I was on a keto diet a few years ago for 3 months. Ate 3 eggs a day and my bad cholesterol plummeted and my good cholsterol elevated. My Vit D climbed to normal instead of having a severe deficiency. I'm going back on that diet again!

    I've been following a mostly animal based diet for a couple years now and eggs are a staple for me. My cholesterol numbers are excellent and my heart disease risk ratio is very low. I've had numerous conversations with my doctor about my 'unique' way of eating and she's very supportive of it, based on my numbers/health :smile:
  • LunaTheFatCat
    LunaTheFatCat Posts: 237 Member
    I would eat eggs on a near daily basis. They better be good for me, as I have no intention on giving up on them.
  • HeidiCooksSupper
    HeidiCooksSupper Posts: 3,830 Member
    edited October 2020
    psuLemon wrote: »
    As a reference, an 8 oz glass of water has 40mg os sodium. Sodium is in almost everything. It's an electrolyte and super important to health.

    40 mg/8 oz. glass is equivalent to about 170mg/liter which seems a bit high to me so I decided to "read up" on it.

    Pure water doesn't have any sodium in it. Softened water and some bottled waters can have a lot of sodium in it. The EPA recommends that tap water (whether well or public supply) have 20 or fewer mg/liter for those on a low sodium diet. To not taste salty or otherwise unpleasant, the US EPA says tap water should have a maximum of between 30 and 60 mg/liter of sodium although the WHO says sodium can go up to 200 mg/liter before taste is definitely unpleasant. By contrast, sodium in sea water is about 30,000 mg/liter but the Mississippi River is only about 20 mg/liter. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2014-09/documents/support_cc1_sodium_dwreport.pdf