Hunger pangs.

Jezwinsborrow
Jezwinsborrow Posts: 7 Member
edited March 2021 in Health and Weight Loss
Hi all I’m back in this app again after 7 years away. I don’t often get hunger pangs but when I do I struggle. Normally it happens in the evening watching telly around 9ish so I normally fight it till 10 then go to bed. How do other people stop the hunger pangs
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Replies

  • L1zardQueen
    L1zardQueen Posts: 8,756 Member
    Did you eat enough calories for the day? Or are you cutting too many calories from your day? What is your goal?
  • penguinmama87
    penguinmama87 Posts: 945 Member
    If you've used up your calories for the day (and you're eating enough), you can try a glass of water to fill your stomach. Or, if you regularly feel hungry at this time, you can arrange your eating plan so that you eat something small. If you're able to just go without until bed, and you feel fine in the morning, you can honestly just keep doing what you're doing and wait, or even go to bed early. You might have a learned association with snacking while watching television, and finding something else to do with your hands while you watch might be helpful.
  • Wiseandcurious
    Wiseandcurious Posts: 730 Member
    I don't like to go to bed hungry so I always make sure to save a little bit of room for a treat if I will be going to bed late - a portion of cheese or some fruit, or even a single cookie is all it takes usually.
  • freda78
    freda78 Posts: 338 Member
    I eat dinner late and save calories for my regular pre-bed bowl of porridge.

    Other than that.... I drink and I drink and I drink. Black coffee, green tea, Lady Grey or no-added-sugar squash.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,870 Member
    Assuming my calories for the day were sufficient, I ignore it (although I might well have something to drink, like herbal tea). If I felt like I absolutely had to eat something (rare, normally if I am feeling hungry in my mind after a normal dinner it's more tiredness and I go to bed), I'd have a pickle or some cucumber or something like that.

    "Pangs" IMO are often interpreted as hunger when they are really not. (I sometimes get them in the morning and they pass.)
  • durhammfp
    durhammfp Posts: 497 Member
    The people above have given you some great advice IMO. Also, one thing that helped me was to ruthlessly cut out any refined sugars. If I eat even the smallest amount of sugar it kicks off a cycle where I feel my energy levels crash and my hunger increases and then I eat more sugar and so on. But this is just me. People are different. Sometimes experimenting with the mix of macros and meal timing can be helpful.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,181 Member
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10825011/if-youre-trying-to-lose-many-of-you-are-gonna-feel-hungry/p1

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    I hate going to bed hungry so I usually choose to eat lighter meals in the earlier part of the day and have a big dinner.
  • scarlett_k
    scarlett_k Posts: 794 Member
    I hate going to bed hungry so I usually choose to eat lighter meals in the earlier part of the day and have a big dinner.

    Same. Breakfast is usually the smallest, bit more for lunch, main meal for dinner.
  • DanaDark
    DanaDark Posts: 2,186 Member
    For me, hunger pangs serve as a reminder that what I am doing is working. So, I try to think of the positive side and just get through it. Also, I typically only have them for maybe an hour and after that I no longer feel hungry for the rest of the day if I just get through it.

    However, low calorie snacks are my go to. Celery, cucumber, baby carrots, air popped pop corn if I have the calories remaining.

    I also lean my calorie intake closer to the evening than the morning.
  • csplatt
    csplatt Posts: 587 Member
    I find that sensation eases after about two weeks. Just my experience. I also save calories for a snack before bed, like a bowl of grapes
  • buckykatt1
    buckykatt1 Posts: 18 Member
    I save about 100-120 calories for dessert around 8 pm. We usually eat dinner between 5:30 and 6:30 so it's nice to have something planned. My go to desserts are Lindy's Italian Ice, half a Klondike bar or the Yasso greek yogurt salted caramel bars (AMAZING).
  • Lynatea
    Lynatea Posts: 308 Member
    A cup of hot tea or sugar free jello does the trick for me.
  • ALZ14
    ALZ14 Posts: 202 Member
    If I’m actually hungry and not bored (usually it is bored for me) then I eat something small. But make sure you aren’t restricting too much, make sure you are eating most of your exercise calories back, and plan your calories to leave 100-200 for a snack in the evening.
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10825011/if-youre-trying-to-lose-many-of-you-are-gonna-feel-hungry/p1

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I disagree that you "have" to be hungry when trying to lose weight. There are multiple studies that show spontaneous decreases in appetite and caloric intake when certain dietary interventions are used. I mean, they are spouted here almost to the point of nausea, but the problem is dietary adherence of these principles. Ok op, my thoughts and the thoughts of some folks far smarter than me.
    1. Reduce the archetype high reward/ hyperpalitable foods in your diet.
    2. Decreases the calorie density of your meals. Add less fat, sugar to your food. Add veggies to meals.
    3. Increase fiber and protein in the diet. Plenty of evidence that protein increases to about 30% or so of protein makes most obese folks reduce caloric intake. Fiber, increases bulk to stomach and slows digestion.
    4. Don't drink your damn calories! Liquid calories have far less satiety than solid. This includes protein. Eat your protein from mostly less processed foods. Skip the shakes and bars if you can.
    5. Limit the variety in your diet. There is evidence that people eat less when the variety of foods at a meal is reduced.
    6. Cook at home and control your environment. When you put your food into the hands of processed food companies you have little control of what's in your meal. Control what you keep in your house. If it ain't there, you are less likely to eat it.
  • PAV8888
    PAV8888 Posts: 10,695 Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    I disagree that you "have" to be hungry when trying to lose weight. There are multiple studies that show spontaneous decreases in appetite and caloric intake when certain dietary interventions are used. I mean, they are spouted here almost to the point of nausea, but the problem is dietary adherence of these principles.

    Size and duration of deficit matters too, including whether you engage in refeeds (though that would be "more advanced"). And the amount of energy reserves available to lose, and your TDEE, also matters when defining the appropriate deficit, which could directly affect "hunger pangs".
    psychod787 wrote: »
    Ok op, my thoughts and the thoughts of some folks far smarter than me.
    1. Reduce the archetype high reward/ hyperpalatable foods in your diet.
    2. Decreases the calorie density of your meals. Add less fat, sugar to your food. Add veggies to meals.
    3. Increase fiber and protein in the diet. Plenty of evidence that protein increases to about 30% or so of protein makes most obese folks reduce caloric intake. Fiber, increases bulk to stomach and slows digestion.
    4. Don't drink your damn calories! Liquid calories have far less satiety than solid. This includes protein. Eat your protein from mostly less processed foods. Skip the shakes and bars if you can.
    5. Limit the variety in your diet. There is evidence that people eat less when the variety of foods at a meal is reduced. [Edit by PAV: initial fanatical logging helped me SOMEWHAT limit that... but I admit to widening my scope as time has gone on. And yes, it IS harder to control "appetite" when having all the candies & cookies sitting in the goodies drawer!]
    6. Cook at home and control your environment. When you put your food into the hands of processed food companies you have little control of what's in your meal. Control what you keep in your house. If it ain't there, you are less likely to eat it.
    Now why did you go and add trigger words such as processed food companies? Would it make ANY difference to your advice if you just said "packaged food producers" or even if you just said "anyone other than yourself"?

    As always... solid and research based advice... even if I am picking on nits!
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 46,181 Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10825011/if-youre-trying-to-lose-many-of-you-are-gonna-feel-hungry/p1

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I disagree that you "have" to be hungry when trying to lose weight. There are multiple studies that show spontaneous decreases in appetite and caloric intake when certain dietary interventions are used. I mean, they are spouted here almost to the point of nausea, but the problem is dietary adherence of these principles. Ok op, my thoughts and the thoughts of some folks far smarter than me.
    1. Reduce the archetype high reward/ hyperpalitable foods in your diet.
    2. Decreases the calorie density of your meals. Add less fat, sugar to your food. Add veggies to meals.
    3. Increase fiber and protein in the diet. Plenty of evidence that protein increases to about 30% or so of protein makes most obese folks reduce caloric intake. Fiber, increases bulk to stomach and slows digestion.
    4. Don't drink your damn calories! Liquid calories have far less satiety than solid. This includes protein. Eat your protein from mostly less processed foods. Skip the shakes and bars if you can.
    5. Limit the variety in your diet. There is evidence that people eat less when the variety of foods at a meal is reduced.
    6. Cook at home and control your environment. When you put your food into the hands of processed food companies you have little control of what's in your meal. Control what you keep in your house. If it ain't there, you are less likely to eat it.
    That's fine if you disagree. I'm speaking of my experience in the field with people I deal with directly on an everyday basis. Unfortunately how people "feel" is subjective depending on who you decide to get your information from.
    If people didn't feel hungry, then we wouldn't have threads asking how to address it. Or people that are overweight in general.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    I disagree that you "have" to be hungry when trying to lose weight. There are multiple studies that show spontaneous decreases in appetite and caloric intake when certain dietary interventions are used. I mean, they are spouted here almost to the point of nausea, but the problem is dietary adherence of these principles.

    Size and duration of deficit matters too, including whether you engage in refeeds (though that would be "more advanced"). And the amount of energy reserves available to lose, and your TDEE, also matters when defining the appropriate deficit, which could directly affect "hunger pangs".
    psychod787 wrote: »
    Ok op, my thoughts and the thoughts of some folks far smarter than me.
    1. Reduce the archetype high reward/ hyperpalatable foods in your diet.
    2. Decreases the calorie density of your meals. Add less fat, sugar to your food. Add veggies to meals.
    3. Increase fiber and protein in the diet. Plenty of evidence that protein increases to about 30% or so of protein makes most obese folks reduce caloric intake. Fiber, increases bulk to stomach and slows digestion.
    4. Don't drink your damn calories! Liquid calories have far less satiety than solid. This includes protein. Eat your protein from mostly less processed foods. Skip the shakes and bars if you can.
    5. Limit the variety in your diet. There is evidence that people eat less when the variety of foods at a meal is reduced. [Edit by PAV: initial fanatical logging helped me SOMEWHAT limit that... but I admit to widening my scope as time has gone on. And yes, it IS harder to control "appetite" when having all the candies & cookies sitting in the goodies drawer!]
    6. Cook at home and control your environment. When you put your food into the hands of processed food companies you have little control of what's in your meal. Control what you keep in your house. If it ain't there, you are less likely to eat it.
    Now why did you go and add trigger words such as processed food companies? Would it make ANY difference to your advice if you just said "packaged food producers" or even if you just said "anyone other than yourself"?

    As always... solid and research based advice... even if I am picking on nits!

    You know me @PAV8888 , I should come with a trigger warning attached! 😘
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10825011/if-youre-trying-to-lose-many-of-you-are-gonna-feel-hungry/p1

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I disagree that you "have" to be hungry when trying to lose weight. There are multiple studies that show spontaneous decreases in appetite and caloric intake when certain dietary interventions are used. I mean, they are spouted here almost to the point of nausea, but the problem is dietary adherence of these principles. Ok op, my thoughts and the thoughts of some folks far smarter than me.
    1. Reduce the archetype high reward/ hyperpalitable foods in your diet.
    2. Decreases the calorie density of your meals. Add less fat, sugar to your food. Add veggies to meals.
    3. Increase fiber and protein in the diet. Plenty of evidence that protein increases to about 30% or so of protein makes most obese folks reduce caloric intake. Fiber, increases bulk to stomach and slows digestion.
    4. Don't drink your damn calories! Liquid calories have far less satiety than solid. This includes protein. Eat your protein from mostly less processed foods. Skip the shakes and bars if you can.
    5. Limit the variety in your diet. There is evidence that people eat less when the variety of foods at a meal is reduced.
    6. Cook at home and control your environment. When you put your food into the hands of processed food companies you have little control of what's in your meal. Control what you keep in your house. If it ain't there, you are less likely to eat it.
    That's fine if you disagree. I'm speaking of my experience in the field with people I deal with directly on an everyday basis. Unfortunately how people "feel" is subjective depending on who you decide to get your information from.
    If people didn't feel hungry, then we wouldn't have threads asking how to address it. Or people that are overweight in general.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Respect sir..
  • sarahq81
    sarahq81 Posts: 26 Member
    I have a herbal tea or an options hot chocolate which only has 40 calories
  • Thoin
    Thoin Posts: 941 Member
    Hi all I’m back in this app again after 7 years away. I don’t often get hunger pangs but when I do I struggle. Normally it happens in the evening watching telly around 9ish so I normally fight it till 10 then go to bed. How do other people stop the hunger pangs

    Water and trying to fill up on vegetables.