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C25K

Jayj180894
Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
I started C25K 6 weeks ago. I've just completed my 2nd run on week 6 and I had to cut it short. Granted it was only by 1 minute, but a minute is a long time in running especially for me. I completed the 20 min run without stopping I was pleased with myself and so happy, but the last 2 runs have been such hard work, my body feels more tired and I'm finding it harder to catch my breath and these last 2 runs have had walking breaks. I don't understand? The first run of week 6 I told myself it was because it was 1°c so I was freezing and I had finished a 12 hour shift so would of been hard, but today I've had great sleep. I ate perfectly yesterday and had a rest day. I don't know what I'm doing wrong and I was so upset with myself for cutting it short but my legs was killing and my chest was tight. Any advice?

Replies

  • penguinmama87
    penguinmama87 Posts: 949 Member
    It could be a lot of things! I wouldn't beat yourself up about it. I find it much harder to run well when it's cold out. My strategy with C25K is that if I'm really struggling with a particular week/day, to just stay there until I feel like I can up the intensity more. The first time I went through it, I did several of the later weeks repeatedly, sometimes two or three times, before I felt ready to progress to the next one.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    Even experienced runners have off days or even off weeks . . . times when you're just not feeling it. Sometimes it feels like when you're progressing consistently, your body sometimes just pumps the breaks a little. It's okay to listen to your body if you feel like you need a walking break. I've actually found when I listen to those signals, I bounce back quicker than when I try to keep forcing it. Twenty minutes of running is a huge accomplishment, don't let the last two runs rob you of that happiness!
  • Jayj180894
    Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
    Thanks guy! You are right I shouldn't let it pull me down from my 20 min run. I'm sure you understand the sense of achievement you have when you complete that run! I couldn't believe I had done it and I was nervous about it as it felt like such a big jump!
  • emmies_123
    emmies_123 Posts: 513 Member
    You are so inspiring! I started a C25K 3 weeks ago so I'm still doing intervals. This week it jumped from 1.5 min stretches to 3 min stretches and I couldn't do it without stopping for a break. I can't wait til I'm as strong as you and can do 20 min segment!

    I'm focusing on the non-scale victory that my calves are recovering faster and faster after each week. I will likely be repeating the Week 3 stuff until I can get to 3 mins consistently.
  • jennypapage
    jennypapage Posts: 488 Member
    It happens, just keep trying until it becomes easier. Also , run slower. Your body will automatically adjust and go faster over time, so make sure you keep a slow pace. When i increase my running time i keep reminding myself to slow down. I also discovered that running without the intervals was easier for me.For some reason the start and stop process made me more tired thanrunning at a steady pace throughout.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,244 Member
    1. Slow down. Most new runners push the pace too much. Keep it slow and easy.
    2. Temperature makes a difference. So does pollen and air pollution.
    3. Bad runs just happen. Sometimes there's a reason, sometimes not. Sometimes the days you don't want to run end up being the best runs. Sometimes you go out happily and the run ends up being a slog. Shrug it off.
  • Jayj180894
    Jayj180894 Posts: 285 Member
    emmies_123 wrote: »
    You are so inspiring! I started a C25K 3 weeks ago so I'm still doing intervals. This week it jumped from 1.5 min stretches to 3 min stretches and I couldn't do it without stopping for a break. I can't wait til I'm as strong as you and can do 20 min segment!
    Thank you! I've never been called inspiring before! So lovely of you! Keep at it and you will shock yourself! I really surprised myself doing 20 mins and the feeling you get when you have completed it is amazing! I can only imagine how I will feel when I complete the programme.

    Also , run slower. Your body will automatically adjust and go faster over time, so make sure you keep a slow pace. When i increase my running time i keep reminding myself to slow down.
    I will try slow down next on my next run and see if that helps my breathing. Thanks!

    2. Temperature makes a difference. So does pollen and air pollution.
    3. Bad runs just happen. Sometimes there's a reason, sometimes not. Sometimes the days you don't want to run end up being the best runs. Sometimes you go out happily and the run ends up being a slog. Shrug it off.
    Will running in low temperature help my breathing getting better in the future?
    And I think I can be too hard on myself sometimes. I'll just try look at the positives on how far I have come. Cheers!
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,038 Member
    An important aspect of C25K is that you don't have to move through the workouts one-by-one. If you find a workout hard, go back to the previous and do it a few more times. Stick to a hard workout for as long as you like. There's no hurry: It really took me a full year to be comfortable running a 5K. Now I run up to 10 miles, when I want to. (Albeit rather slowly.)

    Also, although C25K specifies 3 running workouts per week, it pays to cross train on some of the other days by walking, cycling, or doing something else of lower intensity.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    Jayj180894 wrote: »
    Will running in low temperature help my breathing getting better in the future?

    I think different people have different results, but I absolutely got more comfortable breathing in low temperatures as I progressed in my running.