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New Study “What to Eat to Look Younger”

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  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,929 Member Member Posts: 24,929 Member
    What to eat to look younger: the scientist’s age-reversal diet

    ...They also ... stuck to a “gentle” intermittent fasting window of consuming all meals between 7am and 7pm each day for two months.

    ...Try not to eat outside a 7am-to-7pm window, which will also help to stabilise blood sugar.

    Thanks for posting!

    Interesting to see the part about "fasting" - I have been saying jokingly that I do 12:12, but here they are serious about it!

    My window is more like 11AM-11PM though...
  • NVintageNVintage Member Posts: 1,228 Member Member Posts: 1,228 Member
    I eat greens, pecans or almonds, and eggs a lot. I used to eat liver and onions at a restaurant sometimes, but don't want to cook it! My mother's side of the family all look younger than normal (some strikingly so, like 30 years younger than they are) even though some seem to live on bologna sandwiches and have diabetes. They lived on commodities and garden food growing up in rural Oklahoma. Even though I look more like my dad, I seem to be aging a little slower than my cousins on that side of the family. I think aging, at least the appearance of it, is more genetic than diet related. This subject so interesting to me, more for the science rather than to prevent aging. I agree about people being way too worried about that!
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 961 Member Member Posts: 961 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Interesting, but based on my family history and genetics, I should get to 90 years old no problem (since I'm in physically in better health than both my parents ever were). Dad's still alive at almost 88 years old. Mom passed at 93. My family tree is even the unhealthy non active members got to their 90's.
    I get pegged for being in my forties all the time (I'm 57) and physically, I can still play like a 35 year old average male who plays in a sport.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    My mom is 87 and has smoked for close to 70 years (still smokes a pack a day) and could easily go through half a bottle of rye daily up until 3 years ago - never exercised or did anything active really. My father died at age 33 so I have already outlived him by 23 years.

    If I get my mom's genetics coupled with my lifestyle I should live to be 150. :smiley:

    I'm 56 and I think I look around my age. I used to get told I looked younger but not lately.
    edited June 23
  • NVintageNVintage Member Posts: 1,228 Member Member Posts: 1,228 Member
    "Vitamin D3 at a dose of 4,000 IU/d for 16 weeks has previously been shown to decrease the DNAmAge clock measurement by 1.85 years in overweight/obese African Americans with a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)d] <50 nmol/L [31]. Subsequently, a one-year regimen of daily injection of growth hormone plus one prescription drug and three nutritional supplements was shown to set back the DNAmAge clock by 1.5 years in 9 middle-aged men (plus the 1-year study duration = 2.5 years) [29]. More recently, a 1-year non controlled pilot trial involving 120 participants aged 65-79 years (including 60 Italians, 60 Poles) drawn from the larger NU-AGE cohort found a non-significant trend towards reversal of the DNAmAge clock after 1 year of a Mediterranean diet plus 400IU of vitamin D3 [30]. However, subgroup analysis did reveal a significant 1.47-year age decreases in female Polish participants (n=36) and in individuals with a baseline higher epigenetic age."
    " Also relevant is the demonstration, albeit in a small study, adding dietary supplements of folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 to a vitamin D plus calcium intervention increased biological aging (sex-adjusted odds ratio 5.26 vs vitamin D plus calcium alone) during a 1-year intervention [42]."
    ?????Interesting!
    Thanks for finding the research!!!
    MaltedTea wrote: »
    Do you too want to avoid the registration/paywall? Or do you just want to see the original clinical study with 43 old extra-educated guys? Mmmmk, voila...

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8064200/

    ETA: Scroll down to "Table 2" to see a list of the interventions aka "The Good Stuff"

  • claireychn074claireychn074 Member, Premium Posts: 568 Member Member, Premium Posts: 568 Member
    I haven’t read the research so I don’t know if they specify what type of liver, but I’ve got to say that home made chicken liver pate is just awesome. Honestly, I could eat vats of that stuff. On toast. With loads of butter 🤤
  • Alyssa_Is_LosingItAlyssa_Is_LosingIt Member Posts: 4,696 Member Member Posts: 4,696 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    I can only get the first paragraph - is there anything else of note other than berries, leafy greens and cruciferous veggies?

    Three servings of liver per week …. nope. 😬

    I like fried chicken liver quite a lot. But something tells me that 3 trips to Popeye's per week is not what they're suggesting 😆
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,651 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,651 Member
    yirara wrote: »
    i think the biggest effects on looking younger are: don't smoke, don't get too much sun/get sunburned.

    Oh, man, yes.

    My arms, at this moment, traverse decades. I'm good with sunscreen, but I wear short sleeves (varying amounts above elbow) to row, cycle, do yard work, etc., in warm weather; long sleeves to row in cool weather but rarely gloves; I favor 3/4 or bracelet length sleeves, maybe pushed-up long ones in daily errand/social life if it's cool.

    My hands are brown, quite wrinkly, looking *at least* my 65 years. As my gaze goes up my arm, the skin gets "younger": Light to no wrinkles just above/below the elbow, but lots of freckles; my inherent skim-milk white by the shoulder zone, no freckles or visible wrinkles at all. You can see some of that in my profile photo, though that was at age 60, so things have progressed some age-wise.

    I do some of the things the study supports, like veggie-heavy eating, exercise, etc.; but not other things, like good sleep and near-complete alcohol avoidance. My Garmin estimates my fitness age (based on walking metrics) at 28 right now, though it was down at 20 around a month ago when the weather was cooler (😆 to all of that!).

    My biased perception, augmented by feedback from disinterested others, suggests that my body looks quite a bit younger than the average 65-year-old woman, but my face (which gets less sun than my lower arms) looks every bit of my age (probably helped to that by undyed gray hair, plus some effects of weight loss).
  • springlering62springlering62 Member, Premium Posts: 3,808 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,808 Member
    You’ll be thrilled to know that the same newspaper followed up today with a new article touting oxygenation as the route backwards to youth.

    This one studied both lifelong athletes and couch potatoes and had them do a sort of HIIT routine every five days, making the athletes slow down their usual routines. All showed some sort of improvement in something or other. And when they tested the couch potatoes, who had returned to potato habits, a year later, they still had residual improved oxygen levels.

    I’m starting to believe any study can be manipulated to return pretty much any result you want. My husband was a market research analyst, and he told me years ago you could easily manipulate how people perceived results simply by the type size and portion of the graph or chart you presented.

    He ruined the weight loss smoothing apps for me before I ever even had a chance to need one. *sigh*
  • ythannahythannah Member Posts: 3,922 Member Member Posts: 3,922 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    I can only get the first paragraph - is there anything else of note other than berries, leafy greens and cruciferous veggies?

    Three servings of liver per week …. nope. 😬

    Ewwww no.

    However, mention of liver has made me realize that I am ever so grateful my dad (whose grocery shopping I do) has never asked me to pick some up for him. I know he eats it, he eats all organ meats.

    Maybe it's a generational thing - my mom likes it too.

    You couldn't pay me to eat one piece of liver - ever - never mind three times a week. I mean I don't eat meat anyway but even when I did - never liver.

    I'd rather be old and shriveled. :)

    I think of it more as a Brit thing, the land of steak and kidney pie and haggis and all that. I grew up eating things like kidney, tongue, heart, although I drew the line at tripe. This may have contributed to the fact that I gave up eating meat quite young!
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,651 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,651 Member
    You’ll be thrilled to know that the same newspaper followed up today with a new article touting oxygenation as the route backwards to youth.

    This one studied both lifelong athletes and couch potatoes and had them do a sort of HIIT routine every five days, making the athletes slow down their usual routines. All showed some sort of improvement in something or other. And when they tested the couch potatoes, who had returned to potato habits, a year later, they still had residual improved oxygen levels.

    I’m starting to believe any study can be manipulated to return pretty much any result you want. My husband was a market research analyst, and he told me years ago you could easily manipulate how people perceived results simply by the type size and portion of the graph or chart you presented.

    He ruined the weight loss smoothing apps for me before I ever even had a chance to need one. *sigh*

    This is a tangent, but if anyone is interested in this sort of thing, there's a delightful little book by Darrell Huff, "How to Lie With Statistics", first published in 1954, but some things are timeless. It's aimed at us non-statistician people, to help us understand (without a lot of technical mumbo-jumbo) how to recognize when someone's deploying statistics to mislead, and how that works.

    It's still in print. Amazon has it, and I'll link that below for more information, but I'm betting your library system has it. Fun *and* informative!

    https://www.amazon.com/How-Lie-Statistics-Darrell-Huff/dp/0393310728

  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 961 Member Member Posts: 961 Member
    ythannah wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    I can only get the first paragraph - is there anything else of note other than berries, leafy greens and cruciferous veggies?

    Three servings of liver per week …. nope. 😬

    Ewwww no.

    However, mention of liver has made me realize that I am ever so grateful my dad (whose grocery shopping I do) has never asked me to pick some up for him. I know he eats it, he eats all organ meats.

    Maybe it's a generational thing - my mom likes it too.

    You couldn't pay me to eat one piece of liver - ever - never mind three times a week. I mean I don't eat meat anyway but even when I did - never liver.

    I'd rather be old and shriveled. :)

    I think of it more as a Brit thing, the land of steak and kidney pie and haggis and all that. I grew up eating things like kidney, tongue, heart, although I drew the line at tripe. This may have contributed to the fact that I gave up eating meat quite young!

    Probably! I was born here but my parents came from Scotland in the late 50's. For us it was mostly blood pudding, tatties and mince, and stovies. And beans on toast. :smiley:
    (My dad died when I was a baby so steak pie and liver and such might have been out of our price range.)
    edited June 23
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,651 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,651 Member
    I’m sorry, I can only think of all those checkout magazines covers that I used to see in the 90’s.

    I’m sure every one sported a different ‘superfood’. I did think of making a list of the foods as I saw them, then try to eat it all in one day. I was too disinterested to follow through. A lot of things listed in the article were promoted in those mags at one point or another. I’m still not going to try and eat it all, nevermind give up alcohol.

    Yup I look my age.

    I’ve had a life with lots of fun and a fair share of hardship, it shows. (even with good overall nutrition throughout my adulthood)


    Cheers, h.

    Hmm, I dunno. I've seen your recomp photos. You may look your age, but then a lot of people your age must look older than their age, methinks.

    (Even the linked study suggests a little red wine is good for a person now and then, and we wouldn't want to discriminate against other beverages and make them feel bad, would we? 😉)
  • ythannahythannah Member Posts: 3,922 Member Member Posts: 3,922 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    I can only get the first paragraph - is there anything else of note other than berries, leafy greens and cruciferous veggies?

    Three servings of liver per week …. nope. 😬

    Ewwww no.

    However, mention of liver has made me realize that I am ever so grateful my dad (whose grocery shopping I do) has never asked me to pick some up for him. I know he eats it, he eats all organ meats.

    Maybe it's a generational thing - my mom likes it too.

    You couldn't pay me to eat one piece of liver - ever - never mind three times a week. I mean I don't eat meat anyway but even when I did - never liver.

    I'd rather be old and shriveled. :)

    I think of it more as a Brit thing, the land of steak and kidney pie and haggis and all that. I grew up eating things like kidney, tongue, heart, although I drew the line at tripe. This may have contributed to the fact that I gave up eating meat quite young!

    Probably! I was born here but my parents came from Scotland in the late 50's. For us it was mostly blood pudding, tatties and mince, and stovies. And beans on toast. :smiley:
    (My dad died when I was a baby so steak pie and liver and such might have been out of our price range.)

    We came from Scotland in 68 :D

    There was a little old deli here that used to bring in Scottish foods and I'd pick up black pudding and the like for him (at a horrific markup). He texted me the other day that he was making mince and tatties... and skirlie. My mother made the best steak and kidney pie on the face of the earth. I have her recipe but I've never attempted to duplicate it. However, I could turn out stovies from memory, even now.

    Anyway, there was a reason they used male subjects for this study, I don't think there's any magic food that will turn back the clock for women once our hormones nosedive aka menopause.
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