Heavy Lifting Question

LenGray
LenGray Posts: 842 Member
Hey friends! I'd like some advice, if anyone has any to give. I've been going to the gym and lifting heavy for a while now and I've shared my PR's with my dad, both to get support and to (hopefully) encourage his own fitness efforts. I started seriously lifting about 2 months ago and have been casually lifting for about a year before that. I'm following the StrongLifts program, which has 1 set for deadlifts once per week.

Today, I hit a really great PR. I was able to DL 100 lbs! It's the first time I've ever hit the triple digits and I felt SO happy about it. I had good form, felt strong, and was looking forward to 'clearing' the rack I'm on during my next DL day (the rack has barbells that go up to 110)

But when I told my dad about it, he told me I needed to scale down and that he's seen so many people blow their knees, backs, or ankles out doing DL, even with good form. He's also alarmed at the weight I'm putting on my other lifts (OP- 40, Bench- 60, Squat- 70, Machine Row- 125) I know he doesn't want to see me get hurt, but it kind of deflated all the good feelings I had from this accomplishment.

So, does anyone have any thoughts or insight to share? Am I increasing too much, too fast? Should I scale back and focus on more reps instead of more weight? I feel strong and like I'm making great progress with a sensible plan, but...well...I also don't want to worry my dad?

Also, a note: I know I have the option to just not tell my dad about my lifts, but we are very close and I understand why he's worried. I also know he's proud of me for the progress I've made so far. This is just something I've never encountered and am not sure how to approach on a personal level and don't know if something actually does need to change on a training level.

Replies

  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 746 Member
    Well done on the PR.

    I have no idea if you are going too fast. There does come a time when it is wise to spend some time scaling back and doing more volume, just to allow tendons, ligaments etc to catch up with your strength gains.

    Do you video your lifts and review your form? That's always a good thing to do. If your dad is worried maybe he could fund a session or two with a trainer as your next birthday or Christmas gift?

    But how does the 100lb match up to your body weight? It was my ambition to DL my bodyweight and has taken me about 8 months to get there (so from 30kg to 75kg for 3 reps). I have a pretty conservative trainer who makes me take things slow and build strength gradually. I don't think it's at all unreasonable to DL at least body weight.

    Maybe the standards on the website below will be of use.

    https://strengthlevel.com/strength-standards
  • barefootbridgey
    barefootbridgey Posts: 81 Member
    Congrats also on the PRs

    By no stretch of the imagination am I an expert - but those do not seem like alarming weights to me? Granted I know nothing about your fitness, build, height/weight, etc...so, I mean, who knows.

    Do they feel like reasonably hard yet doable weights? Because if so, you're probably good. I've been mostly a cardio person forever, but have been lifting since January. My starting DL and Squat were both about 60 lbs and I'm at 144 for both now - so your numbers seem reasonable. I'm not small, by any means, or in amazing shape (not by a long shot) but I'm generally pretty active think the thing for new lifters (like us!) is that the initial strength gains come much faster than the later ones.
  • deputy_randolph
    deputy_randolph Posts: 940 Member
    edited July 2021
    My personal feeling is that if you are capable of completing your reps with good form...then NO the weight is not too much too fast.

    I benched 160lbs at 135lbs...and at 40 years old. I didn't injure myself. Keep in mind, I started benching years before with an empty 45lb bar.

    No offense to your dad, but if you are following a structured plan, using good form, not overextending yourself and then training in pain....well, you can lift whatever amount you want to lift.
  • Cherimoose
    Cherimoose Posts: 5,210 Member
    Blown out knees and ankles from deadlifts? I suppose it's theoretically possible, but i've never heard of anyone doing that. Back injuries do happen sometimes, although that's usually avoided with proper abdominal bracing and a sensible progression in training volume. I agree about checking your form using video for deadlifts & squats, and consider posting them for the trainers here to give feedback.

    BTW, the deadlift is an important enough lift to do twice per week, and more than one set per workout.. although each set doesn't need to be near-maximal effort. One set per week doesn't make much sense.
  • I2k4
    I2k4 Posts: 179 Member
    edited July 2021
    My youth, coming out of college was spent using machines, currently on resistance bands and bells, but if you're committing to the current regime of heavy barbell squats, deadlifts, and presses I'd suggest you look into professional programming rather than Dad's dinner table advice. I've started watching the Mind Pump Podcast crew and, setting aside their colorful and entertaining opinions on anything else, they are sound and sensible about the variety of fitness goals and how to achieve them with resistance training, and they offer a series of three month packages to guide progress, several of which are implemented by local PTs who form their audience. They're obviously not the only game in town but as good a place to start thinking about what to do as I know of.

  • LenGray
    LenGray Posts: 842 Member
    Thanks for the replies everyone!

    @Snifterpug, Thanks :) It was a pretty exciting moment! 100 lbs is a little less than 1/2 my bodyweight. I haven't videoed my lifts, but I've checked them in the mirrors at the gym and check out form videos pretty regularly.

    And I'll definitely bring up the trainer idea with my dad! Right now, I've nearly got him convinced to fund a few sessions of rock-climbing so a few sessions with a personal trainer wouldn't surprise him lol Also, thanks for the site! It looks like I'm pretty on-track for a novice lifter.

    @barefootbridgey, Thanks! And yeah, they feel challenging but not difficult. I had a talk with my dad and showed him my training logs, which I think helped a bit. I also explained that I'm starting to fail reps, which means I'll be forced to slow down weight-wise pretty soon.

    @deputy_randolph, I think he just worries.

    @Cherimoose, I'm running through the StrongLifts program. From my understanding, it focuses less on DLs because you're squatting every session. It's been a pretty nice program for increasing my strength. I'll definitely consider recording videos of my form!

    @l2k4, I'm doing a professional program called StrongLifts.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,097 Member
    edited July 2021
    To be blunt, your dad is fibbing. Deadlifts don't blowout knees, backs, or ankles.

    Evidence shows that deadlifts are not inherently dangerous more than any other lift and those who state so, simply are misinformed.

    Also "good form" is not reality. It can't be defined universally so it doesn't exist.

    I have lifters who deadlift with one arm, one leg, scoliosis, etc...anywhere from age 11-77 currently with no issues.

    I myself have deformed joints from a progressive disease. Hands, hips, feet, knees, ankles, wrists, elbows, shoulders are all effected by the disease. Yet I don't magically blow our my knees or back because my programming is appropriate.

    The key is proper load management. Accounting for all stress both useful & useful and dispersing it throughout training.

    Using appropriate weight with adequate volume will lower injury risk for all lifts.

    SL is a linear program. Used for a novice or somewhat possible for someone who took a small hiatus depending on their volume. It has zero load management and usually only last a few months before inappropriate intensity and grinding of reps are apparent throwing off any chance of adequate recovery.

    My suggestion is to begin seeking appropriate programming that includes proper load management. It is single handedly the best thing you can do for long term progress.

    If you like, you can post a vid in my "form check" thread and I can cue some technique advice.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,454 Member
    I2k4 wrote: »
    My youth, coming out of college was spent using machines, currently on resistance bands and bells, but if you're committing to the current regime of heavy barbell squats, deadlifts, and presses I'd suggest you look into professional programming rather than Dad's dinner table advice. I've started watching the Mind Pump Podcast crew and, setting aside their colorful and entertaining opinions on anything else, they are sound and sensible about the variety of fitness goals and how to achieve them with resistance training, and they offer a series of three month packages to guide progress, several of which are implemented by local PTs who form their audience. They're obviously not the only game in town but as good a place to start thinking about what to do as I know of.


    I wasn't familiar with the Mind Pump Podcast so looked it up. Of the 4 guys on it only one has an exercise related degree. I'm pretty sure there are better resources out there.
  • I2k4
    I2k4 Posts: 179 Member
    edited July 2021
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I2k4 wrote: »
    My youth, coming out of college was spent using machines, currently on resistance bands and bells, but if you're committing to the current regime of heavy barbell squats, deadlifts, and presses I'd suggest you look into professional programming rather than Dad's dinner table advice. I've started watching the Mind Pump Podcast crew and, setting aside their colorful and entertaining opinions on anything else, they are sound and sensible about the variety of fitness goals and how to achieve them with resistance training, and they offer a series of three month packages to guide progress, several of which are implemented by local PTs who form their audience. They're obviously not the only game in town but as good a place to start thinking about what to do as I know of.

    ...

    I wasn't familiar with the Mind Pump Podcast so looked it up. Of the 4 guys on it only one has an exercise related degree. I'm pretty sure there are better resources out there.

    Not saying they're be all end all but they're packing a half-century combined training and performance experience, have expert interviews, are fun to watch off topic and make good sense when on it. There's no end of paper chase academics with one bee in their bonnets with much less to say about many fewer things. The OP advised of being on a professionally developed program already, and considering a PT - the original point of steering to this source.
  • JBanx256
    JBanx256 Posts: 1,471 Member
    Anytime I bring up riding a motorcycle to someone who doesn't ride, I hear horror stories about how their college roommate's best friend's neighbor's uncle's coworker was in some freak tragic wreck and therefore riding a motorcycle is stupid/dangerous/you should never ever do it because what is your kid going to do without their parent when you die in a giant fireball...

    ...oddly enough, I never hear that *kitten* from people who actually ride.

    What I'm saying here is, your dad is making horribly inaccurate statements based on his own bias & ignorance on the subject matter.

    Deadlifts don't "cause" blown-out ankles, knees, hips, spines, or anything else.
  • alexmose2
    alexmose2 Posts: 208 Member
    Take a peak at "Squat university" on instagram ;)