Sometimes I wish my appetite would disappear

I'm an ex-smoker/ex-weed smoker (recent quit, 12-18 months for the weed, 3-4 months for tobacco) and in the last 4-5 months I've increased from 62-63kg to 68kg. Now I'm 160cms tall (female) and until recently I was lightly to moderately active, averaging 5-10000 steps on a work day before exercise. I got a new full-time job (coinciding with the quit smoking) and I am luck if I can average 2000-3000 steps a day - my exercises are only just getting me close to or above 10000 steps.

I know that I am only just on/over the BMI healthy/overweight line, but the combination in quitting, new job, reduced movement has me 5kgs up and I feel hungry quite a bit which I know is boredom, and not having something to do with my hands.

I am at that point in quitting where I am thinking I should have kept smoking (yeah, I realise I am technically healthier).

I don't really know why I am posting this, except to bemoan the increase (which seems huge to me even though it isn't really huge) in size; and also sometimes I miss smoking weed so much (no, I'm not in a legal country/state).

My food diary is all over the place, some days I manage to log everything and others I get to 5pm and have no energy left to log - despite that I have managed to maintain at 68 for a month.

I keep repeating CICO and I am enjoying my walks/runs (ok, jogs) with my dog, but today I just feel disheartened, I guess.

Woe is me? Who wants to be first to give me a boot up the bum?

Replies

  • sheahughes
    sheahughes Posts: 130 Member
    Thank you!
  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 4,051 Member
    I'm not much of a boot up backside kind of person 🙂

    Just staying at your current weight for a month sounds like an accomplishment, given the circumstances. Change is hard, giving up smoking is hard, transitioning to a new job is hard, both at the same time is hard.

    It can take some time to find a new equilibrium after change happens. Staying at the same weight while you figure things out is fatty from the worst thing.
    If boredom is an issue, look for an activity to distract yourself.
    If your decreased activity level is an issue, try to find small ways to be more active? There is a thread somewhere on how to increase your non exercise activity (I'm typing this on my phone, I hope someone else can link to it).
    If logging is an issue, how about pre-planning and pre-logging your meals more (for example by batch cooking during the weekend)?

    You're allowed to have a 'sucky' period, just try and hang on while you look for solutions 🙂
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,859 Member
    Lietchi wrote: »
    I'm not much of a boot up backside kind of person 🙂

    Just staying at your current weight for a month sounds like an accomplishment, given the circumstances. Change is hard, giving up smoking is hard, transitioning to a new job is hard, both at the same time is hard.

    It can take some time to find a new equilibrium after change happens. Staying at the same weight while you figure things out is fatty from the worst thing.
    If boredom is an issue, look for an activity to distract yourself.
    If your decreased activity level is an issue, try to find small ways to be more active? There is a thread somewhere on how to increase your non exercise activity (I'm typing this on my phone, I hope someone else can link to it).
    If logging is an issue, how about pre-planning and pre-logging your meals more (for example by batch cooking during the weekend)?

    You're allowed to have a 'sucky' period, just try and hang on while you look for solutions 🙂

    Thread might be this one:

    http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10610953/neat-improvement-strategies-to-improve-weight-loss/p1

    OP, if you're bored, need something to do with your hands, some good hobbies in this scenario are things that either require clean hands (such as sketching (even doodling or coloring), needlework, playing a musical instrument, etc.) or create dirty hands (painting, gardening, carpentry, etc.). No need to be good at the thing, if you can get absorbed in doing it, distracted, then it will pay off . . . and you'll get better at it with practice.
  • sheahughes
    sheahughes Posts: 130 Member
    Thank you, I have checked out that thread and implemented some of the suggestions found there.

    The boredom is mostly an issue when I am at work 9-5 and required to be at my desk as much as possible, even when there isn't "work" to be done. The building is one storey so no stairs, the toilets are close by as is the kitchenette and I have one other co-worker so there are some things that won't work but I have ordered a stand up desk to go on my workstation to at least give me the ability to stand instead of sitting.

    When I am home I have lots of stuff to do and a variety of hobbies so I can keep busy most of the time and distract myself. It's just so easy to sit and munch away my day at work.

    Thinking of also getting a couple fidget spinners to keep my hands occupied.

    I freely admit to feeling down the other day and having a pity party but today I am much better.
  • yweight2020
    yweight2020 Posts: 591 Member
    Congratulations on taking those first steps to a healthier life, this takes alot for most to give up and I know a few of them. My granny had 8 kids 7 of them smoked just like her inclu my mother who has lived with asthma since childhood and bronchitis and Copd as an adult which she takes 3 differwnt treatments 3 ti.es a day. Hopefully you don't have any of those and luckily avoided any health complications. You're literally saving yourself and those around you. You can do this all one step at a time. My friend mother stopped smoking after decades using a smoking program and patches through her doctor and meeting support group.. exercise, nutrition and support were here for you at MFP.🤗❤
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,859 Member
    sheahughes wrote: »
    Thank you, I have checked out that thread and implemented some of the suggestions found there.

    The boredom is mostly an issue when I am at work 9-5 and required to be at my desk as much as possible, even when there isn't "work" to be done. The building is one storey so no stairs, the toilets are close by as is the kitchenette and I have one other co-worker so there are some things that won't work but I have ordered a stand up desk to go on my workstation to at least give me the ability to stand instead of sitting.

    When I am home I have lots of stuff to do and a variety of hobbies so I can keep busy most of the time and distract myself. It's just so easy to sit and munch away my day at work.

    Thinking of also getting a couple fidget spinners to keep my hands occupied.

    I freely admit to feeling down the other day and having a pity party but today I am much better.

    What can you get away with doing at your desk, if there's not actual work to do? There are things like those squeezy hand exercisers that can be a good fidget, there are exercises for finger dexterity, can you do earbuds or other low-key audio for podcasts or something? Sketching/doodling (consider Zentangles)? Drawing lower case and upper case alphabets with one's foot is good for ankle mobility, and only requires subtle movements.

    I can understand having some down days; that's frustrating. Hang in there!
  • Venus_1
    Venus_1 Posts: 59 Member
    There is some sort of a mini treadmill that you can walk while you’re at your desk. Since you have a stand up one that might be an option to do all your steps during the work day.
    I drink tea to cut appetite. After a warm cup of tea the hunger gets quieter. Also try to surround yourself with healthy low cal snacks.
    I also sit a lot during the work day so I try to stay active at my free time without any excuses. And if I don’t have much to do at work I read books.
    Don’t restart smoking 3-4 months is a great streak!
  • Skyler103
    Skyler103 Posts: 112 Member
    The 20th of this month will be my one year anniversary of quitting smoking cigarettes. Never thought I'd be able to do it. It's been hard for me. Once I got over the initial couple of months of wanting to eat everything in sight, I've been trying to lose weight. It isn't the same since I quit. Nicotine obviously really amps up the metabolism since it's a stimulant. It's been a year and I feel like I'm coming out of a fog, finally. Quitting really messes with your endorphins. I urge you to look up what the chemicals in cigarettes do and how your body reacts when you take it away. It will at least help you understand why you're feeling the way you feel.
  • curwhibbles
    curwhibbles Posts: 138 Member
    I think you’re doing great. Boot in the bum: Just keep going.
  • plattef71
    plattef71 Posts: 22 Member
    My mom had the same issue and gained 50lbs after she quit smoking. You should be proud though that you had the willpower to get it done. I find I am seriously hungry too after working at my desk all day. The Vitamin Shoppe has a natural supplement called Glucomannan. It promotes satiety and digestive support. You take it before a meal and I am good for a while after. It's really hard to distract from sitting there but I find now that I read these forums, meal plan and even sometimes do squats while holding my work chair lol.
    You got this and you know it, just have to convince the rest of you.
  • MargaretYakoda
    MargaretYakoda Posts: 1,944 Member
    sheahughes wrote: »
    Thank you, I have checked out that thread and implemented some of the suggestions found there.

    The boredom is mostly an issue when I am at work 9-5 and required to be at my desk as much as possible, even when there isn't "work" to be done. The building is one storey so no stairs, the toilets are close by as is the kitchenette and I have one other co-worker so there are some things that won't work but I have ordered a stand up desk to go on my workstation to at least give me the ability to stand instead of sitting.

    When I am home I have lots of stuff to do and a variety of hobbies so I can keep busy most of the time and distract myself. It's just so easy to sit and munch away my day at work.

    Thinking of also getting a couple fidget spinners to keep my hands occupied.

    I freely admit to feeling down the other day and having a pity party but today I am much better.

    I can recommend knitting for this.
    Fidget spinners are good. But most people find them interesting for a limited amount of time.

    You can start knitting or crocheting cotton washcloths. They’re easy enough to carry around. No one cares if you’re a beginner and they’re a bit crooked. And you eventually get good at knitting. Which is a big plus.

    Also? Everyone loves cotton washcloths. I would knit them during political party meetings and just give them away to someone at the meeting. Kept my hands from getting my mouth in trouble. Most of the time. ;)
  • ponycyndi
    ponycyndi Posts: 858 Member
    You've done a great job quiting smoking, and maintaining your weight for a month!
    You've done those 2 hard things, I know you can do so much more!