Exercises for prolapse

I have organ prolapse and being told no heavy lifting or jumping .. etc. I guess this is pretty common with older ladies who have had multiple children on top of a hysterectomy.
Normally I swim 4-5 times a week but with the weather changing it's almost time to put the cover on the pool. Now I have to find something that will be productive but not leave me vulnerable to another prolapse (bladder and rectum). It's super embarrassing but I am stuck on what to do.

Replies

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,626 Member
    Are you able to walk, meaning both physically capable and your doctors say it's OK? That may not be as feasible as we get deeper into winter (or maybe it will, who knows, it's been a record-setting year for high temperatures), but walking is perfectly cromulent exercise. Cycling is also good, if that's something you're able to do. Really, you should consult with your doctor and maybe ask for a referral to a specialist (like a PT or similar) who can help build programming that is both safe and worthwhile for you.

    With the right gear, assuming one doesn't also have a medical condition such as Raynaud's, winter is no deterrent for walking ;)

    For example, save a larger pair of jeans and add a layer of pajamas or leggings underneath. My biggest expense was boots. Everything else is layers of ordinary clothes, a thrift store parka, and gloves and a ski mask from a close-out style store.

    When I was in the military working outside in upstate NY, the problem was not staying warm, but keeping from getting too hot, as the gear they gave us was TOO good, lol.
  • MargaretYakoda
    MargaretYakoda Posts: 1,944 Member
    edited September 2021
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Are you able to walk, meaning both physically capable and your doctors say it's OK? That may not be as feasible as we get deeper into winter (or maybe it will, who knows, it's been a record-setting year for high temperatures), but walking is perfectly cromulent exercise. Cycling is also good, if that's something you're able to do. Really, you should consult with your doctor and maybe ask for a referral to a specialist (like a PT or similar) who can help build programming that is both safe and worthwhile for you.

    With the right gear, assuming one doesn't also have a medical condition such as Raynaud's, winter is no deterrent for walking ;)

    For example, save a larger pair of jeans and add a layer of pajamas or leggings underneath. My biggest expense was boots. Everything else is layers of ordinary clothes, a thrift store parka, and gloves and a ski mask from a close-out style store.

    When I was in the military working outside in upstate NY, the problem was not staying warm, but keeping from getting too hot, as the gear they gave us was TOO good, lol.

    Adding to your list yaktrax or similar, to keep fall risk to a minimum.

    Yaktrax Walk Traction Cleats for Walking on Snow and Ice Yaktrax Walk Traction Cleats for Walking on Snow and Ice (1 Pair) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0094GO9DA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_CY2EV4XGETMPXR7FCQYB
  • I like the program MommaStrong (https://mommastrong.com/) for exercises that are focused on strengthening that area. I do walking and MommaStrong for my exercise. I also second the recommendation for PT - pelvic floor focused PT - to help you get better.
  • plattef71
    plattef71 Posts: 22 Member
    I can walk without an issue. They gave me a ring to insert but it's uncomfortable ! So since my post I have seen my foot doctor and I have a tear starting in my Achilles so I get to add that right in the mix.
    I may try the stationary bike and see how that goes.