Exercise after work...

I'm a 42 year old Carpenter. My job is very labor intensive i hit 10000 steps by noon every day. I find it hard to stay motivated when I get home.
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Replies

  • musicfan68
    musicfan68 Posts: 1,033 Member
    I think as a carpenter, you get enough exercise through your job that you probably don't need extra exercise. My dad was a general contractor for 40 years, and was constantly moving, climbing ladders with bundles of shingles, etc. That was his exercise.
  • PAV8888
    PAV8888 Posts: 12,077 Member
    Are you thinking that I order to manage your current weight you have to increase your exercise?

    Having said that, I would caution you that for the purposes of MFP definitions of non exercise activity, a 10k step day is active; very active would start (for most people, not everyone, of course) closer to 12-13k steps and most people would be moving to above very active at above 15.5k steps per day.

    You can manage your weight without an iota of exercise by the way. And moving towards a more personally appropriate weight often gives people an extra spring in their step.
  • tilic9980
    tilic9980 Posts: 4 Member
    Just feel lethargic. And I know I need to maintain cardio to stay healthy.
  • snowflake954
    snowflake954 Posts: 8,163 Member
    I, too, wouldn't worry about exercising when you have an active job. Do you want to lose weight? If so, then you need to control your calorie intake and, since you're active, eat enough and especially enough protein. Do not cut calories drastically--a small deficit would be best. If you don't want to lose, then watch your macros.

    If you do want to do some other type of exercise, it should be something you like doing--recreational exercise. If you're married or have a significant other you could take them dancing.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 28,236 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    tilic9980 wrote: »
    Just feel lethargic. And I know I need to maintain cardio to stay healthy.

    In your position I would say deliberate exercise would be very much optional and something you would want to consider in conjunction with very specific fitness related goals. If you are getting over 10K steps by noon, you are getting plenty of cardiovascular work...your heart doesn't have to be going 100 MPH to be getting good cardiovascular work in...you're getting way more cardiovascular work than the average desk jocky does doing deliberate cardio exercise for 30-60 minutes per day, and well in excess of what most health bodies recommend. In that regard, I think you're fine.

    Having a labor intensive job it a lot of exercise. The whole concept of "regular exercise" and health body recommendations of 150 minutes per week, etc came about as the population transitioned from a largely labor intensive workforce to a more sedentary, desk ridden workforce. It is highly important for desk jockeys to get out there and deliberately move and exercise...because sitting around all day can be very bad health wise...this is much less of a factor for individuals with very active and labor intensive jobs.

    As to your lethargy, is your activity level set appropriately to your very active job? Are you consuming enough calories (energy)? If not, that could be part of the problem. On the other hand, I used to work landscape construction...I was always friggin' tired...because I was literally "exercising" all stinkin' day. Drove my wife (then girlfriend) crazy, because I was always in bed by 9 PM, if not earlier. The only deliberate exercise I did then was walk my dog...that wasn't for me, that was for the benefit of my dog.

    Coincidentally, I just read the US government version of those guidelines.** While they don't talk much about people with active jobs, the list of "moderate intensity activities" includes "general yard work and home repair work". Seems like a job as a carpenter would have quite a bit of time in the day that would meet the "moderate intensity activities" threshold.

    ** https://health.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf
  • tilic9980
    tilic9980 Posts: 4 Member
    Thank you for the suggestion. I'm 5' 9" about 175 I'm ideal weight is 160. Diet is new to me as my metabolism has began to slow. I used to run 3 to five miles 5 times a week. Due to injury I'm unable to continue this activity. I'm looking for an alternative. I need to maintain stamina and don't want to get winded climbing or walking several stories of stairs
  • JBanx256
    JBanx256 Posts: 1,457 Member
    tilic9980 wrote: »
    my metabolism has began to slow

    what leads you to believe this?

  • Lietchi
    Lietchi Posts: 5,151 Member
    edited April 2022
    I'm going to be pragmatic.
    You are tired after work, not motivated to work out.
    -> your options, IMHO, are:
    - work out after work anyway. Might require willpower, but if you can make it a habit, it will become easier. Start with a goal of 10 minutes 3 times a week, for example, mentally this will probably be easier than immediately aiming for a longer duration and higher frequency. Also, what helps me is to change into my workout clothes as soon as I get home and not 'soir down and rest' first. I work out at home, but if you want to work out at a gym, I would recommend keeping workout clothes in your car, for example, so you can go straight from work to the gym. Personally, I need to work out before dinner, after dinner or becomes too tempting to just chill on the couch.
    - work out on the weekends (presuming you have days when you don't work)
    - work out before going to work (this is not an option for me, I am not a morning person, but it works for others)

    The thing is, motivation really isn't what should be driving you, unless perhaps that deeper motivation of wanting to stay fit. If you find it important, you will find a way. The best strategy, IMHO, is to build your exercise routine on habit, not motivation. So find a time that works for you, perhaps find little tricks (e.g. laying out your workout clothes beforehand, changing into workout clothes as soon as possible, etc.), find exercise you enjoy and start small. If you find it important, you'll find a way 😉
  • JBanx256
    JBanx256 Posts: 1,457 Member
    To build on what @Lietchi said

    I work 12-hour rotating shifts. When I get home and am exhausted and cranky, ALL I want to do is get a shower, eat, and see my family for a bit before I crash out. If you tried to MAKE me go to the gym, I'd fight you (joking...halfway). I mean, SOMETIMES I could probably make myself go, but most of the time, just nope, and if/when I DID go, it'd be the most half-arsed pathetic excuse for training it'd just be a waste of time and energy (then I'd get frustrated making no progress and the whole thing would just spiral downhill). And besides that, that's my family time. It would not be fair to them for me to be gone all day for work and then turn right back around and head out to the gym.

    So I go before work. On dayshift that means I'm at the gym no later than 2am. Is that absolutely mental? Yes. But it gets done. Everyone else in the house is asleep, so I'm not stealing quality time that I could be spending with them. It also helps me get my head right for the rest of the day. Am I burning the candle at both ends? Sure. I play a mad game of catch-up on sleep on my days off, but that's a choice I make and it works for me (and my family).
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 26,519 Member
    tilic9980 wrote: »
    Thank you for the suggestion. I'm 5' 9" about 175 I'm ideal weight is 160. Diet is new to me as my metabolism has began to slow. I used to run 3 to five miles 5 times a week. Due to injury I'm unable to continue this activity. I'm looking for an alternative. I need to maintain stamina and don't want to get winded climbing or walking several stories of stairs

    With only 15 pounds to lose, weight loss will be slow and you should choose the least aggressive rate of loss, a half pound per week.

    If you choose a more aggressive rate, you'd be undereating, which can lead to lethargy by itself, let alone your active job.

    9kjwnia17qv9.jpg

    Like others have said, you get plenty of cardio at work. Perhaps hit the weights on the weekend?
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 28,236 Member
    tilic9980 wrote: »
    Thank you for the suggestion. I'm 5' 9" about 175 I'm ideal weight is 160. Diet is new to me as my metabolism has began to slow. I used to run 3 to five miles 5 times a week. Due to injury I'm unable to continue this activity. I'm looking for an alternative. I need to maintain stamina and don't want to get winded climbing or walking several stories of stairs

    You may've begun to slow, but it's highly unlikely that your metabolism has, at 42.** For sure, if you were at a steady weight, stopped running 5 times a week because of that injury, and changed nothing else, you'll be gaining weight. You can go back to maintaining via replacement exercise, or by eating less.

    I get why you might want to continue exercise, though. Motivation is less an issue if you find the activity fun (or at least mildly tolerable to vaguely enjoyable). What do you enjoy? When you were running, what motivated you to do that 5 times a week?

    You say you can't run. What's the nature of the injury? Example: I have OA and a torn meniscus, can't run. I row (boats when I can, machines when I must), and bike. That works fine, for me. Swimming might be an option for you, or some kind of active VR game, or . . . lots of things. It depends on the injury.

    If your injury may heal, taking a break to allow that is not long-term doom, either. If you think you can recover and run again, then taking the time to heal/rehab might be a worthwhile investment.

    ** Said from the perspective of age 66, plus this:
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34385400/
  • wilson10102018
    wilson10102018 Posts: 1,306 Member
    You're a carpenter. you don't need any exercise. you can only hurt yourself or get repetitive motion injuries. Meet the ladies at church instead.
  • PAV8888
    PAV8888 Posts: 12,077 Member
    edited April 2022
    Between needing additional exercise to meet recommended minimum levels of activity (probably none required in this case given the active job) and hurting yourself, or getting repetitive motion injuries by exercising (no reason to believe this to be true)... there is a bit of a gap.

    If you mean that a carpentry job has some risk of repetitive motion injury, you are correct in that the job probably does carry some such risk as do many many many other jobs.

    If you mean that a construction job has a higher risk of physical injury than an office job, probably you would be right again.

    Not sure how the job risks would affect post job exercise risks...

    In general activities such as exercise and crossing the street do have risks that people should mitigate.

    I've actually injured myself sneezing but I'm not sure that I would recommend against sneezing when the urge strikes! Best to maybe suggest that one should sneeze cautiously if one has reason to be concerned!🤷🏻‍♂️
  • wilson10102018
    wilson10102018 Posts: 1,306 Member
    On average, a casual three times per week jogger has two injuries per year. An injury is defined as missed work or medical treatment. they range from stubbed toes to killed in traffic. That makes jogging about 1000 times more dangerous than working in a sheet metal factory where a million injury free work hours is the norm, not an exception.

    Gym exercise injuries from lifting are worse.

    Contact sports like pickup basketball take home the injury trophy.
  • MissAtomicBomb238
    MissAtomicBomb238 Posts: 61 Member
    tilic9980 wrote: »
    Thank you for the suggestion. I'm 5' 9" about 175 I'm ideal weight is 160. Diet is new to me as my metabolism has began to slow. I used to run 3 to five miles 5 times a week. Due to injury I'm unable to continue this activity. I'm looking for an alternative. I need to maintain stamina and don't want to get winded climbing or walking several stories of stairs

    An alternative could be stair climbing, battle ropes, swimming, etc. If you don’t mind me asking, what’s the injury? I’m a runner (who hasn’t been injured in 15 years of running as opposed to what a previous poster wrote…) and sometimes injury doesn’t always mean the end to running…just a thought.

    Also, cardio based exercise may up your energy levels. Maybe reframe your language from motivation to consistency or habit. I’m not motivated, but I am disciplined.

    Also, are you drinking enough water? That contributes to lethargy for me.
  • wilson10102018
    wilson10102018 Posts: 1,306 Member
    tilic9980 wrote: »
    Thank you for the suggestion. I'm 5' 9" about 175 I'm ideal weight is 160. Diet is new to me as my metabolism has began to slow. I used to run 3 to five miles 5 times a week. Due to injury I'm unable to continue this activity. I'm looking for an alternative. I need to maintain stamina and don't want to get winded climbing or walking several stories of stairs

    An alternative could be stair climbing, battle ropes, swimming, etc. If you don’t mind me asking, what’s the injury? I’m a runner (who hasn’t been injured in 15 years of running as opposed to what a previous poster wrote…) and sometimes injury doesn’t always mean the end to running…just a thought.

    Also, cardio based exercise may up your energy levels. Maybe reframe your language from motivation to consistency or habit. I’m not motivated, but I am disciplined.

    Also, are you drinking enough water? That contributes to lethargy for me.

    I certainly did not say that you got injured each year, but I assume you do not dispute the statistics? If you said it was on average one injury per year or one injury every two years, I would disagree but it would still be too many.
  • Redordeadhead
    Redordeadhead Posts: 1,188 Member
    On average, a casual three times per week jogger has two injuries per year. An injury is defined as missed work or medical treatment. they range from stubbed toes to killed in traffic. That makes jogging about 1000 times more dangerous than working in a sheet metal factory where a million injury free work hours is the norm, not an exception.

    Gym exercise injuries from lifting are worse.

    Contact sports like pickup basketball take home the injury trophy.

    Who misses work or gets medical treatment for a stubbed toe?
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 7,238 Member
    On average, a casual three times per week jogger has two injuries per year. An injury is defined as missed work or medical treatment. they range from stubbed toes to killed in traffic. That makes jogging about 1000 times more dangerous than working in a sheet metal factory where a million injury free work hours is the norm, not an exception.

    Gym exercise injuries from lifting are worse.

    Contact sports like pickup basketball take home the injury trophy.

    Who misses work or gets medical treatment for a stubbed toe?

    Maybe he means when a toe's cut off? :)
  • JBanx256
    JBanx256 Posts: 1,457 Member
    Hmm.

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