Fatigue from depression or depression from fatigue

ChelzFit
ChelzFit Posts: 288 Member
For the past three months I have noticed way more fatigue and due to this I have a loss of interest in most things. The thought of doing things just sounds exhausting. I am still forcing myself to do things even though I don't want to. Come the weekend I usually crash and take a 2 hour nap on Saturday and Sunday. I have been to the doctor-thyroid and iron levels all normal-really has no answer for me. I even took a week off from exercise and no improvement.
I currently get up at 4:50 and workout 4 days a week for a hour-40 minutes of moderate cardio and twenty minutes weights. The other three days I walk lightly on the treadmill for about 50 minutes. On the weekends I sleep in until 6:45. I am ALWAYS in bed by 9:00. I am a kindergarten teacher and have two little ones that I am rushing to activities all the time-but I have been doing this for years. I eat around 2,400 cals and weight 130 and I am 5'7.
I do have a history of anxiety and I have been taking Lexapro for well over 10 years. Last year I upped it to 20mg. I don't like the feeling of not wanting to do anything and I have no motivation and I know that can be a sign of depression, but I am not sure if it is because I am so tired that it is making me depressed.
**I did have COVID back in November, but the fatigue really did not start until the end of February beginning of March.

Replies

  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,298 Member
    edited May 15
    So many things...

    I might ask my doctor for a different anti-depressant, sometimes they stop working or were not the right one to start with.

    I never felt "right" on any prescription drugs. Not saying that's the problem, but 10 years on one anti-depressant seems like a really long time.
  • sollyn23l2
    sollyn23l2 Posts: 221 Member
    I agree with cmriverside. 10 years seems like a long time. But I'm not a doctor. In any way. However, I have been on Lexapro, and I know it made me feel like a zombie. No exaggeration. So, since you say you upped your dosage this past year, it may be a good conversation to have with your psychiatrist (I hope you're seeing one if your on psych meds, because regular doctors know almost zero about depression, anxiety, and psych meds. Also, keep in mind many doctors will tend to basically just "set it and forget it" with psych meds. Unless you bring it up, they often won't even think about the fact that they have you on antidepressants.
  • ChelzFit
    ChelzFit Posts: 288 Member
    Thank you-I don't have a psychiatrist but I do have a therapist that I see every so often-she just cant prescribe meds. I always hesitate to tell my gp my loss of interest because he always wants to jump to medicating me. I have thought for sometime that I might need to switch to a different anti-depressant, I just wish I knew what the cause of the fatigue is.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,636 Member
    If you take a training break, or at least a very significant reduction in training stress (intensity and volume), to resolve any physical fatigue then you may get closer to finding your answer.
    Good luck.
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,449 Member
    ChelzFit wrote: »
    Thank you-I don't have a psychiatrist but I do have a therapist that I see every so often-she just cant prescribe meds. I always hesitate to tell my gp my loss of interest because he always wants to jump to medicating me. I have thought for sometime that I might need to switch to a different anti-depressant, I just wish I knew what the cause of the fatigue is.

    Then who prescribed your meds?
  • glassyo
    glassyo Posts: 6,449 Member
    Did you know you can't edit a post if there's only 1 minute left and you're already in it?

    Anyway, nevermind. I reread the first post.:)
  • healingmysticmelody
    healingmysticmelody Posts: 38 Member
    I am not in the same Universe as your fitness level. I do know about anxiety and depression. You probably eat fruits and vegetables all day long but I felt a world of difference when I started eating frozen mixed vegetables and frozen berries. I was missing something my body needed. I also had a vitamin D deficiency which shocked me because I had spent the previous two summers at our campground sitting outside on the deck. But it was shady so no vitamin D. We also went south for a couple weeks in the winter and got some more sun. But I am not a big milk drinker so I didn’t get supplemented that way. You probably run outside so get plenty. Also added a quality multi-vitamin and primrose oil supplement to help with the female hormones.
    I don’t know if any of these will be any help in your situation but in case one of them could help, I wanted to share what helped me. :)
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,626 Member
    ChelzFit wrote: »
    For the past three months I have noticed way more fatigue and due to this I have a loss of interest in most things. The thought of doing things just sounds exhausting. I am still forcing myself to do things even though I don't want to. Come the weekend I usually crash and take a 2 hour nap on Saturday and Sunday. I have been to the doctor-thyroid and iron levels all normal-really has no answer for me. I even took a week off from exercise and no improvement.
    I currently get up at 4:50 and workout 4 days a week for a hour-40 minutes of moderate cardio and twenty minutes weights. The other three days I walk lightly on the treadmill for about 50 minutes. On the weekends I sleep in until 6:45. I am ALWAYS in bed by 9:00. I am a kindergarten teacher and have two little ones that I am rushing to activities all the time-but I have been doing this for years. I eat around 2,400 cals and weight 130 and I am 5'7.
    I do have a history of anxiety and I have been taking Lexapro for well over 10 years. Last year I upped it to 20mg. I don't like the feeling of not wanting to do anything and I have no motivation and I know that can be a sign of depression, but I am not sure if it is because I am so tired that it is making me depressed.
    **I did have COVID back in November, but the fatigue really did not start until the end of February beginning of March.

    I took Wellbutrin for about 20 years. It stopped working last summer. We tried a few different meds. You're supposed to give them a month or so but I only gave them a few days. I settled on Cymbalta, which made a huge difference in my mood and energy level. I tend to be sensitive to meds so she started me on the lowest dose, 20 mg. Last month I noticed I was wanting to nap all the time and had some other things going on that led me to discussing upping my dose with my psychiatrist. (I'm with the VA and have to get mental health meds from a psychiatrist - I was fine getting them from a GP prior to starting health care with the VA.) I felt a little speedy the first few days on 30 mg, but then settled in and am enjoying my improved mood and energy level.

    Cymbalta warning - I go into withdrawal 45 minutes after a missed dose so set two alarms to make sure I take it the same time every day. I am aware that discontinuing it completely will be painful, should the need ever arise.
  • Millicent3015
    Millicent3015 Posts: 373 Member
    Are you getting enough sleep? It could be that you're doing too much, and you're depleting your energy bank and not putting enough back in by taking time to just relax, and that tiredness might be contributing to the depression, which is tiring to have and manage, so you find yourself locked in a circle of fatigue >> depression >>fatigue >> depression ad infinitum, and each makes the other worse. Is it depression or is it stress? Is it possible for you to get up an hour later and do 30 minutes less exercising? Could you get up a bit later on the weekends? You don't have to be on the go all the time. You could even try gentler exercises. It might be an idea to talk with your doctor or therapist about Long Covid, because side effects can manifest months after you've recovered from the virus. If you still feel depressed, fatigued or stressed after altering your routine, go back to your doctor and/or therapist and maybe you can figure out other things to try that would make things easier for you to manage.
  • Kiwi2mfp
    Kiwi2mfp Posts: 87 Member
    There is a chance this is still covid related. Covid has the ability to flare up every single virus laying dormant in your body that you may have encountered. People have had the cold sore virus flare up. Epstein barr...I have fibromyalgia so that flared up horribly. I had Covid in October and had an unexplained drop in my kidney function suddenly. This was found as they did my annual blood work. But kidney issues can cause exhaustion also. All around I was exhausted for months after covid. Is there any viruses you have laying dormant in your body that is known to cause fatigue when it's active? You don't have to answer that publically...just something to think about.
  • parkerpowerlift
    parkerpowerlift Posts: 190 Member
    Kiwi2mfp wrote: »
    There is a chance this is still covid related. Covid has the ability to flare up every single virus laying dormant in your body that you may have encountered. People have had the cold sore virus flare up. Epstein barr...I have fibromyalgia so that flared up horribly. I had Covid in October and had an unexplained drop in my kidney function suddenly. This was found as they did my annual blood work. But kidney issues can cause exhaustion also. All around I was exhausted for months after covid. Is there any viruses you have laying dormant in your body that is known to cause fatigue when it's active? You don't have to answer that publically...just something to think about.

    Glad you mentioned this. OP is wayyyy more active than I ever could be. That being said, I had COVID in January, followed by mono in March (Epstein-Barr for others that don't know). Between those two illnesses, already being immunocompromised, AND having chronic fatigue issues anyways, I'd bet money on this being a big factor for OP if they experienced COVID or anything similar.

    That being said, OP, I hope you can grant yourself some grace. You're doing the best that you can and you're balancing so much. I hope you can find some relief soon.
  • Sinisterbarbie1
    Sinisterbarbie1 Posts: 293 Member
    Iagree with what everyone has said about easing up and giving yourself some down time and space to rest. But please also talk to your primary care physician about the fatigue and the timing of it and any other symptoms. Many things can cause fatigue whivh we can;t even begin to comprehensively guess at here - nutritional deficiencies including vitamin D which is common post winter in the north east and mid atlantic US, iron or various B vitamin deficiencies which can cause anemia, lyme disease if you exercise outside would not be crazy to check for, and the list goes on. You should be able to check most things with blood tests. Don’t try to address nutritional deficiencies on your own because if you have some imbalance at a level that is causing fatigue then you would typically need prescription strength doses of vitamins to get back to the right levels, and doses at those levels can be dangerous if not actually needed. Also ask your partner if you are snoring or have interrupted breathing at night/gasping for air. Some people suffer from sleep apnea and wake up hundreds of times a night without realizing it themselves. There are a variety of possibilities, some with fairly straightforward remedies - others more complex, but fatigue is such a nonspecific symptom and you have such a busy life and schedule it is important to get a dr to see past that and understand that you are saying you aare feeling something physically different than normal fatigue associated with your level of busy/strain.
  • ChelzFit
    ChelzFit Posts: 288 Member
    Thank you everyone for the great advice! I did reach out to my PC again and he is going to do some more extensive blood work. I did have mono when I was 25 and I have never felt the same ever since having it-always suspected CFS. My PC mentioned that as well this time when I met with him. I am officially on summer break so I am really going to work on slowing down and hoping that I will see some improvement in my fatigue. I am also considering working with someone other than my PC to talk to me about the possible depression.
  • Kiwi2mfp
    Kiwi2mfp Posts: 87 Member
    ChelzFit wrote: »
    Thank you everyone for the great advice! I did reach out to my PC again and he is going to do some more extensive blood work. I did have mono when I was 25 and I have never felt the same ever since having it-always suspected CFS. My PC mentioned that as well this time when I met with him. I am officially on summer break so I am really going to work on slowing down and hoping that I will see some improvement in my fatigue. I am also considering working with someone other than my PC to talk to me about the possible depression.

    CFS and Fibromyalgia have a lot of similarities. Long covid is a lot like both of these too. That being said, you can get tired from being depressed AND depressed from being tired. Having CFS and/or Fibromyalgia can be depressing for some. I have days I'm depressed because the pain and exhaustion seems to rob me of my day. Having the Epstein barr virus at some point in your life does seem to be a risk factor for getting CFS or Fibro, though doctors are still sketchy on how solid this link is...shoot they are sketchy on just about everything CFS and Fibro related. Anyway, knowing the cause of why you feel like you do is such a relief to a lot of people. Eventually you will learn what causes your body to flare up and start to learn how to avoid these things...be it diet or behavior related. Anyway, I hope you find answers soon. Just know, it's okay to feel that way. It's okay to be tired. It's okay to be sad. Beating yourself up isn't going to help either. Hang in there.
  • Kiwi2mfp
    Kiwi2mfp Posts: 87 Member
    Kiwi2mfp wrote: »
    There is a chance this is still covid related. Covid has the ability to flare up every single virus laying dormant in your body that you may have encountered. People have had the cold sore virus flare up. Epstein barr...I have fibromyalgia so that flared up horribly. I had Covid in October and had an unexplained drop in my kidney function suddenly. This was found as they did my annual blood work. But kidney issues can cause exhaustion also. All around I was exhausted for months after covid. Is there any viruses you have laying dormant in your body that is known to cause fatigue when it's active? You don't have to answer that publically...just something to think about.

    Glad you mentioned this. OP is wayyyy more active than I ever could be. That being said, I had COVID in January, followed by mono in March (Epstein-Barr for others that don't know). Between those two illnesses, already being immunocompromised, AND having chronic fatigue issues anyways, I'd bet money on this being a big factor for OP if they experienced COVID or anything similar.

    That being said, OP, I hope you can grant yourself some grace. You're doing the best that you can and you're balancing so much. I hope you can find some relief soon.

    My flare ups started 2 or 3 months after I had Covid too. I thought I was all good to go and then my body just flipped out. It felt like I was being attacked on so many levels. At first I didn't know what was going on until I Googled my issues and found all kinds of studies showing these dormant viruses popping up after you think you're done with Covid! Well technically you are done with Covid but the hit on your immune system is what allows these viruses to resurface. Suddenly it made sense why I was such a mess. I wasn't even hospitalized with Covid. I told my doc about these flare ups and she said Covid has that ability also...so it wasn't just Dr. Google that told me that. The after effects of Covid can sometimes be as bad as the initial sickness. I'm still not the same 7 months later.
  • girlwithcurls2
    girlwithcurls2 Posts: 2,237 Member
    I'm so sorry for those of you experiencing all of these other symptoms after thinking you'd recovered from Covid. A friend said to me that "Covid had the key that unlocked my Epstein-Barr." :( We just don't know enough yet. I hope you all get answers and relief. Covid is bad enough. Lasting issues just doesn't seem fair.