Early summer heat kicking my *kitten*!

Jthanmyfitnesspal
Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,242 Member
edited June 2022 in Fitness and Exercise
I had a harder time working out this spring due to COVID in April and a big move in May. I gained a little weight, too. Now the weather is warming up a but (still only in the low 80s), and running/cycling workouts are kicking my *kitten*. Plus, I'm trying to cut the pounds, which also makes my normal workouts a little bit harder. In general, I'm struggling, but not giving up. :#

(My swim workouts are about the same, however. Gotta love that water on a hot day. B) )

I know that I need to hydrate regularly before 1hr workouts, but it can be hard. I find I like to chug up to 16oz right before I go so it's more likely to come out the pores than via the bladder-- ideally with electrolyte drink. Also, it can help to eat a banana or something. It takes just a little planning and I haven't been getting it right lately.

What do y'all do to beat the heat?

Replies

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,304 Member
    As I've aged, the heat bothers me more and more...it didn't used to bother me at all to go for an afternoon ride in the summer with temps around 100* (which is the norm right now), but these days I just can't do it. I'm good to about 90*, but after that it's a no go. I run on Mondays and Wednesdays during my lunch break (11:30AM) where I still find it comfortable enough to run outdoors as temps are generally 85-90*.

    For cycling in the summer I either drag my butt out of bed early to ride or Zwift in the afternoon...rides are typically Tuesday, Thursday, and Sunday...on Sundays I just go mid morning around 9:30/10 AM when it's still very pleasant to be outdoors. I've also been doing more trail riding than road and my trails tend to have a good bit of shade since they run through the Bosque along the Rio Grande...but the shade isn't much help in the late afternoon/early evening when it's 102*. At least we don't have humidity here.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,979 Member
    I've never handled heat well, and that may've been extra true while I was still obese but active in an outdoor sport.

    I do find that I become more conditioned to heat if I take it gradually. Some years, the weather here cooperates, by mostly warming gradually. This year the weather didn't help, went quickly from freakin' cold to hot/humid quite rapidly. Under those conditions, I keep the outdoor exercise much lower intensity and/or lower volume at first, build back gradually.

    In addition to the good practices you have with hydration and electrolytes, FWIW some things that have helped me at one time or another are:

    * Dumping water on myself at the start of a workout, or during if practical, for more evaporative cooling. At races, I used to take two bottles of water in the boat, one to dump over my body at the start line, the other to drink after the finish. (Rowing lends itself to this more than most other sports, I know.)

    * Being extra-careful about all other recovery factors (things I'm already pretty conscious of as a li'l ol' lady) like sleep, nutrition, stress management, activity mix (type, intensity, frequency, duration, etc.).

    * Hats. (Matters for me, may not for you. Type also matters. On the river, I like cotton ball caps vs. synthetics because I can dunk them in the river to wet them.) For me, there are some subjective aspects to feeling hot that can vary depending on how the hat shades me.

    * Figuring out the right balance of clothing that covers (loosely) vs. minimalist clothing with more bare skin. It can matter how sunny it is, how windy, how humid . . . not just raw temp, IME.

    * Not keeping the house ultra-cold with A/C. Summer or Winter, I do better outside if I keep the typical house temp inside at the seasonally-similar end of the comfort range, i.e., warmer end in summer, cooler end in Winter. Here, too, YMMV.

    * Presented with an opportunity when really hot, I run cold water on my wrists until I feel cooler. (On the river, I'll trail a hand in the water when we're taking a break, to that level.)

    * Those neck ties that have gel granules inside, that you soak in water and maybe keep in the fridge besides (when not using them), really can help. It puts some cooling right near the large blood vessels in the neck, where it's more helpful.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,968 Member
    I'm jealous. It's 57F. We're not getting summer this year.
  • Lxxy30
    Lxxy30 Posts: 12 Member
    I live in the desert where the heat goes up to 125 F. Right now its 111 and even driving is unbearable. I have fallen off the wagon due to a couple factors the heat being a major one , been maintaining my weight loss last couple weeks . I think mentally I need to just suck it up and suffer 😂 make sure hydrate a lot like you said
  • LemonMarmalade
    LemonMarmalade Posts: 227 Member
    @NorthCascades I will trade!!! It’s over 100 with the heat index here. I really hate summer.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,898 Member
    edited June 2022
    When riding/running in the heat, I use an electrolyte drink. Since I do my long rides/runs on weekends, I use and follow the Precision Hydration recommendations: One 16-20oz drink the night before, then another upon waking before the ride on Sat am. That way, I'm topped off and hydrated, yet haven't consumed so much water that I'll lose it all in the restroom before riding. Then, during the workout I consume 1-2 bottles per hour depending on conditions. So I'd typically consume about 4 bottles during a ride lasting 3 hours. I continue that process on Saturday night and Sunday am if I'm planning a swim/long run on Sunday.

    ETA: This is for hydration only. I also consume calories, but from a separate source.
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,859 Member
    Mini heatwave here in England......

    Before yesterday's 54 mile ride I made sure I was fully hydrated well before I started out.
    Went out a bit earlier than I would normally to avoid the highest afternoon temperatures.
    I chugged half a pint of fluid very last thing before setting out, using my stomach as an extra bottle in addition to the two insulated bottles on the bike.

    Wore a white close fitting but wicking cycle shirt, carrying absolute minimum of things in the pockets as I wanted maximum cooling. Bandana to keep sweat out of my eyes.
    Plotted a route to take in some woods and shade.
    Also plotted a stop where I could refill my bottles (and have an ice cream as a reward for a PB on a hard climb!).
    Checked hydration level at the refill stop. If you can't pee you probably aren't drinking enough.

    I have half hourly reminders programmed into my Wahoo bike computer to keep on top of hydration.
    Consumed 4 bottles in total in 3hrs 40mins, two carbs and electrolytes and two plain water.

    Needed about two pints after the ride, one recovery drink and another plain water.
    Bit of a salt craving later probably showed I was under on my electrolytes - or do I just really like savoury snacks? :wink:

  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,242 Member
    Given the really high temperatures in parts of the country, I will not complain about the New England weather! It was 60degF, sunny, and warming this morning-- pretty incredible. The problem is with me. I'm getting more sensitive and need to plan better or I suffer even in 80-90degF conditions, which didn't used to bother me at all!

    I try to do exactly what @Djproulx suggests by drinking a full bottle before starting. I just need to plan for that, because I need to drink it right before I go and I prefer electrolyte (e.g., Nuun) to plain water. Sometimes, I'm running at work or out of my car. It hit me real bad a couple of times in the past few days and I suffered. Gotta remember to bring and chug the pre-exercise drink. Gotta remember to bring the Gu and water even on shorter runs/rides just in case.

    I might not drink a whole 20oz of water the night before, however. (Depends on how long before bed.) ;)

    @AnnPT77 is also right on. Dousing with water can really work, particularly when cycling.
  • pridesabtch
    pridesabtch Posts: 1,932 Member
    edited June 2022
    Been struggling as well. Thanks for the tips and reminders.

    I routed my last walk for a water stop mid way, but I didn't really think it through well (96F @ 60% humidity). Didn't carry water figuring I was just walking (~15m/m) and I'd hit the gas station in about 30 minutes. Thought the loop was my old 4 mile loop, it was actually my 10k training loop (oops). That day was a total fail... but boy the ice cold water at the gas station was nice even though I think the gal behind the counter thought I was dying. It was a long slow walk back with almost no shade.

    Today I will do better. Drinking at work, taking water with me, whether I walk or ride, refilling stations along the way...

  • x_stephisaur_x
    x_stephisaur_x Posts: 146 Member
    When are you exercising? When it's hot here, I try and get out for a run as early as possible to try and beat the heat a little! Not unusual for me to be out before 6am on a hot day.
  • westrich20940
    westrich20940 Posts: 643 Member
    Well --- I am there with you. I do not work in June/July...so I am lucky that I can just get up at 7am if needed to beat the heat and do a run. It's still very humid but at least it's not 100F.

    I use Nuun tablets and (maybe TMI) I try to keep an eye on my urine color - especially the day before a planned run and make sure I'm not setting myself up to be miserable. Also my running route has a more shady half/side of it. It's an 8 mile loop but one side is more grassland-y and one side is more forest. So if I'm planning on doing 6 miles or shorter, I just do an out/back on the shady side and avoid the open, sunny side all together. If I'm doing 8 I start on the sunny side so that the temp is cooler during that part and when it's warmer later in my run I'm in the shady side.

    Now that school is back again though...if I am planning on running on a weekday, I have to do it right when I get home (I'm not going to become a 5am runner, LOL) to beat what will eventually be a really early sunset. So it'll be hot. =/ I know that my body will be really mad and think I'm betraying it..but it'll get easier right? Right? pls tell me it'll get easier. XD.


  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,269 Member
    edited August 2022
    I live in Tucson and workout in my garage all Summer with an Evap Cooler next to me. It's typically, even with the cooler, 90 to 95 degrees when I do.

    You adapt to it. Just have to be very cautious with paces and HR. Drink a lot and take electrolytes. I do tend to get one or two dehydration migraines every Summer, so the electrolytes are a very important component.

    I use it as a training aid of sorts. If you can train or even do intervals or supersets in extreme heat, it's pretty easy work come the cooler months. The human body is pretty amazing. I followed a guy named Harvey Lewis for years, a Cincy native (my hometown). He's won Badwater twice (the famous ultra in the CA desert). Back in the day, he would wear a Winter coat in Cincinnati during the Summer (typically low 90s and unbearable humidity) and pull truck tires up the largest hills he could find. Of course, you have to be fairly smart with it, but if you're well trained, you can do it.

    I had a friend recently take his rower to Death Valley and row a 7:30 2K. He's over 60 and has cancer (not technically in remission but he's doing well). IDK why in the heck he would do that, but he does that type of stuff. He was preparing for a climb up a mountain (which he didn't quite make).

    Similar thing with the competitors at the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii. It gets well up over 100 there during the competition. Can't imagine all the heat they train in to get ready for that.

    Just like those that train at higher elevations and adapt, you can adapt to a certain level of heat, as long as you listen well to your body.
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,242 Member
    @Djproulx : I give you a hug for that, but actually, maybe it's more inspiring. Coke is an interesting choice for a bike event, but it sounds like it worked!
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,898 Member
    @Djproulx : I give you a hug for that, but actually, maybe it's more inspiring. Coke is an interesting choice for a bike event, but it sounds like it worked!

    Regular Coke is a staple along the run course at ironman events. Lots of sugar, salt and caffeine in one package.
    My training partner uses Coke as his main fuel on the run course as well as in his special needs bag that is available at the halfway point on the bike course during Ironman races.
  • MikePfirrman
    MikePfirrman Posts: 3,269 Member
    Djproulx wrote: »
    @Djproulx : I give you a hug for that, but actually, maybe it's more inspiring. Coke is an interesting choice for a bike event, but it sounds like it worked!

    Regular Coke is a staple along the run course at ironman events. Lots of sugar, salt and caffeine in one package.
    My training partner uses Coke as his main fuel on the run course as well as in his special needs bag that is available at the halfway point on the bike course during Ironman races.

    I've heard about Coke for a long time among ultra-endurance athletes (of which I definitely am not one!). I know Harvey Lewis has mentioned it a lot.
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,242 Member
    I don't think I could drink Coke while exercising. The carbonation would kill me. I'd prefer to have a sports drink of some kind.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,898 Member
    I don't think I could drink Coke while exercising. The carbonation would kill me. I'd prefer to have a sports drink of some kind.
    I don't think I could drink Coke while exercising. The carbonation would kill me. I'd prefer to have a sports drink of some kind.

    My friend consumes Coke during the second half of the bike split and on the run. He uses Coke as his fuel, (plus water or tailwinds for hydration) so mostly he drinks it while walking through the aid stations. He consumes the water/tailwinds during his running stretches between aid stations.