question for female heavy lifters....

perdie7
perdie7 Posts: 278 Member
I had a hysterectomy last week...they also had to do some repair, because my bladder and vagina were prolapsed. My Dr said no heavy lift ever or it would happen again...When I went bugged eyed on him, and asked for clarification and said I lifted weights, as part of my workout and weight loss, and I was squatting 200 lbs, as well as dead-lifts, etc. (to which he looked a litter surprised of disbelief) He then said that was fine, since I was doing it for my health, I just could do repetitive lifting all day if it was my job.

I'm a little confused now, I don't want it to happen again, I also don't want to quit lifting, altogether, but I really don't see the difference between doing it for my health, and someone who does it for a job.

anyone have experience with any of this?

Replies

  • perdie7
    perdie7 Posts: 278 Member
    bump
  • Jugie12
    Jugie12 Posts: 289
    Don't ask us, ask your doctor. You're paying him for his service and advise - get your money's worth.
  • dad106
    dad106 Posts: 4,875 Member
    I'd ask your Doctor for some more clarification.

    Some one who lifts for health reasons is constantly changing the weight.. and thus putting more/new strain on the body.

    Some one who lifts for a job though most likely lifts the same amount over and over all day.. and their body is used to that. So as long as that amount doesn't change, then they can go on lifting for their work.

    I think thats what your doctor was trying to get at... but you really should ask him.
  • wareagle8706
    wareagle8706 Posts: 1,091 Member
    I'm not him, but the way it reads to me is he is saying if you do it ALL DAY LONG for your job then that's not good. But if you're only doing it for a couple hours or so a few times a week that's fine. Anyone else reading it like this?
  • sarah44254
    sarah44254 Posts: 3,078 Member
    I'm not him, but the way it reads to me is he is saying if you do it ALL DAY LONG for your job then that's not good. But if you're only doing it for a couple hours or so a few times a week that's fine. Anyone else reading it like this?

    I'm getting that jist too. I'm also wondering if he thinks you have better form and you lift things with a goal during exercise is safer than monotonous lifting large boxes just because your job tells you to. I know I use sloppy form lifting stuff at work but I'm very particular during lifting sessions.

    be sure - call him again :)
  • secretlobster
    secretlobster Posts: 3,568 Member
    I know you're looking for general "anyone else been there?" advice but you really should go back and talk to him... And definitely ask to be referred to a physical therapist! Returning to your life in weight lifting will require transition, and you should do it under the guidance of someone who has a degree in sports medicine.
  • mathjulz
    mathjulz Posts: 5,526 Member
    Maybe he is thinking that, for your health means its a shorter amount of time than "for your job" (all day long). And maybe that if you're doing is as weight training, you're using more proper form and possibly protecting yourself against repeating the injury.

    But I'm with the others. I would ask him for clarification. There will be another follow-up, right? I might be a good idea to give yourself a month off to recover (I don't know how long - I have no experience with this kind of surgery!) And if the doctor can't give you anything more specific about what is okay and what to avoid (and a bit of why), maybe you can find a doctor who can. Someone in sports medicine may be able to.
  • Easywider
    Easywider Posts: 434 Member
    I would take it easy and let your body recover from such an invasive procedure...

    Squats, deadlifts, bench...all heavy compounds should be toned down if not discontinued. If I were you..I'd focus more on low-impact cardio and just try to maintain while you recover.

    You can play hurt but you can't play injured...Not worth the risk, IMO.
  • 1SlimShaylee
    1SlimShaylee Posts: 204
    I know you're looking for general "anyone else been there?" advice but you really should go back and talk to him... And definitely ask to be referred to a physical therapist! Returning to your life in weight lifting will require transition, and you should do it under the guidance of someone who has a degree in sports medicine.


    agreed!!
  • hesn92
    hesn92 Posts: 5,971 Member
    I don't know, you should talk to your doctor about it more. I know a women who had a hysterectomy and she had to quit lifting altogether.
  • MissyMissy18
    MissyMissy18 Posts: 317 Member
    I'd ask a couple different doctors. Yours seems a little unclear...
  • PicNic00
    PicNic00 Posts: 269 Member
    My mom had the same thing.....

    Her doctor told her... "women's bodies were not designed to do really heavy lifting"
    It puts way too much pressure on our delicate female organs.
  • HeidiMightyRawr
    HeidiMightyRawr Posts: 3,345 Member
    To be honest, his response really confused me. One minute you can't, then you can :/
    Maybe he means only heavy lifting that you are used to / is part of your regular activity. For example, stick to your lifting but don't push to failure, so it's maintaining the lifting amounts, not increasing much.

    If I were you I'd get a second opinion though, from another doctor. Don't go trusting people's judgements on here, as nobody is qualified for that. Even the doctors here won't know your specific case.
  • ncashman
    ncashman Posts: 14 Member
    You should be talking to a professional but perhaps not this doctor. MD's (and especially if it was your surgeon) aren't trained in everything especially things along the lines of exercise and nutrition (those topics aren't part of their focus and can usually only give general guidelines that apply to everyone not individuals). You need to ask for a referral for someone who can help you and work with you towards your weight lifting goals. Or they might say heavy lifting is out for you and then they can help you come up with a workout plan that you can do.
  • Bonniejacks
    Bonniejacks Posts: 2 Member
    I had similar surgery in Jan. I had to lay off ALL exercise for twelve weeks then I could start walking and gradually building back up to a jog. The lifting didn't come into play until around sixteen weeks and then light weights to start. I am not a heavy lifter. The most I squat is 50lb because it is hard to get it over my head. I have a fitness room at home but no spotter. It is true that the prolaspe can return and I like you WOULD NOT like to have that surgery again but am not willing to give up lifting. My doctor told me that I could continue with my life as before. Just practice good form and being careful to contract the muscles while lifting or doing cardio. Now I don't know if she would have said the same about lifting as heavy as you do.
  • JNick77
    JNick77 Posts: 3,797 Member
    Take time to recover. After I had that disc protrusion my doctor told me I would never Squat again and that I should never do Good Mornings, ever. Well, I do both and my back is stronger than ever. Take your time and work back into it but I can't see how having a hysterectomy would prevent you from lifting again, maximally for that matter.
  • meshashesha2012
    meshashesha2012 Posts: 8,344 Member
    there's a huge difference between lifting a weight that close to your 1RM (heavy lifting) and lifting lighter weights. lifting heavy puts different stresses on your body than lifting lighter. we all know that right? i think that's all he's saying.

    just continue working at less than half your current weights maybe and dont worry about lifting heavy until you get your doc's OK