Easiest way to start lifting??

sistrsprkl
sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
I'm joining a gym again so I can really start to lift heavy like the rest of y'all. I have no idea what I'm doing. I've seen the names of the programs that are popular here, but what's the simplest way to start? I don't even know how to use some of the equipment. I'd rather not hire a trainer. TIA

Replies

  • hill8570
    hill8570 Posts: 1,466 Member
    edited March 2015
    Read through the intro stuff on the Stronglifts website. Buy the book Starting Strength (Kindle format is quite cheap) and read up on the mechanics of the various lifts. Practice the forms with a broomstick.

    At the gym, ask gym management to show you where the various barbell stuff is (if you're not particularly strong, definitely find out where the women's bars are). Practice form with the bar.

    After all that, you should have plenty of other questions :smile:
  • sistrsprkl
    sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
    Thank you! That's helpful!
  • rckeeper22
    rckeeper22 Posts: 103 Member
    You may want to hire a trainer for just one session too, if you're at all uncertain about the form for any of the lifts. That way they can teach you form and what to look for so that you get the most out of your lifts without causing injury.

    Or invest time watching videos/reading articles about your lifts so that you know what to look for; they're not difficult to get right especially if you start with the right habits.
  • sistrsprkl
    sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
    Thank you, yeah, I'll spend some time on Youtube but may also hire a trainer to show me the ropes. Hiring a trainer once is cheaper than medical bills if I hurt myself ;)
  • SilverRose89
    SilverRose89 Posts: 447 Member
    Hey! I'm exactly the same as you. I had my first session lifting with a friend who knows what he is doing last Friday. It's great!

    Definitely recommend going with a trainer, or someone who knows what they are doing, so they can show you and check your form and stuff. I do plan on going on my own but will probably do a good few more sessions with my friend so I can be sure I'm not going to hurt myself before I do that.
  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,575 Member
    sistrsprkl wrote: »
    Thank you, yeah, I'll spend some time on Youtube but may also hire a trainer to show me the ropes. Hiring a trainer once is cheaper than medical bills if I hurt myself ;)

    I spent a few hundred on a trainer when I first started. Don't regret it one bit. It definitely made my financial life sticky but now I have a new healthy lifestyle, a new body, and more knowledge. I'm not missing that money now.
  • lngrunert
    lngrunert Posts: 204 Member
    I used a trainer to teach me to lift properly and I think it's one of the best investments I've ever made. I'm one of those people who can't really learn effectively by just watching or reading something; I really need a person there to look at what I'm doing and correct it on the spot or its easy for me to get into bad habits that are hard to break.

    A good trainer should be able to show you the ropes in a session or two at most, so if you can swing it financially I'd recommend it highly.
  • lishie_rebooted
    lishie_rebooted Posts: 2,973 Member
    hill8570 wrote: »
    Read through the intro stuff on the Stronglifts website. Buy the book Starting Strength (Kindle format is quite cheap) and read up on the mechanics of the various lifts. Practice the forms with a broomstick.

    At the gym, ask gym management to show you where the various barbell stuff is (if you're not particularly strong, definitely find out where the women's bars are). Practice form with the bar.

    After all that, you should have plenty of other questions :smile:

    This but also read through the group here "Stronglifts 5x5 for Women", they've taken the time to explain the program in a less douchey way than Medhi plus you'll have a group of others doing the program as well if you do have any questions
  • TCO76
    TCO76 Posts: 242 Member
    hill8570 wrote: »
    Read through the intro stuff on the Stronglifts website. Buy the book Starting Strength (Kindle format is quite cheap) and read up on the mechanics of the various lifts. Practice the forms with a broomstick.

    At the gym, ask gym management to show you where the various barbell stuff is (if you're not particularly strong, definitely find out where the women's bars are). Practice form with the bar.

    After all that, you should have plenty of other questions :smile:

    This....

    It's like the bible of training. Form and positioning are THE most important thing to grasp before doing any regimen.

    Good luck
  • SideSteel
    SideSteel Posts: 11,068 Member
    If you do hire a trainer AND if your goal is to learn how to perform squats/deads/bench/presses/rows/etc so that you can do SL properly (or another barbell program) then I'd be sure to take your time finding a trainer that understands how to do those movements and I'd also be VERY clear (I can't stress this enough) that your goal is to learn how to do these movements.

  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,575 Member
    SideSteel wrote: »
    If you do hire a trainer AND if your goal is to learn how to perform squats/deads/bench/presses/rows/etc so that you can do SL properly (or another barbell program) then I'd be sure to take your time finding a trainer that understands how to do those movements and I'd also be VERY clear (I can't stress this enough) that your goal is to learn how to do these movements.

    This. I know there are some trainers at my gym who do not even lift. Not a thing.
  • sistrsprkl
    sistrsprkl Posts: 1,013 Member
    Ok, thanks so much guys! Sounds like I really need in-person guidance to get started. I have a family member who's an expert so I'll get help from him before hiring a trainer who may/or may not know what they're doing. Family member is out of town so that's why I didn't just go to him before posting this, but seeing him soon.
  • foursirius
    foursirius Posts: 321 Member
    Starting strength is a good one and then just start reading as much info on the topic as you can.
  • kandeye
    kandeye Posts: 216 Member
    Also film yourself doing the lifts each session. It has helped me a lot being able to review my videos and compare my form with the videos on the 5x5 app.
  • rainbowbow
    rainbowbow Posts: 7,490 Member
    edited March 2015
    What i did was hire a trainer for 3 sessions only (he was a trainer at the gym but i approached him on the side, NOT through the gym). I had seen him training people in the gym doing the exact type of things i wanted to learn and he himself was JACKED like none other. I asked him to just check my form and give me pointers on my 3 day a week workout and whether anything needed to be improved or anything added.

    He and i actually became really good friends and would workout after his day was over and push each other. He left to join the marines, but man he was cool...

    Anyways, my point is, you can watch videos online, read about it, etc. But it's really much easier to have someone just be like "nope, you're dropping your chest" or "hey, make sure you squeeze here", etc.