Can someone explain Macro nutrition to me?

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fairy2b
fairy2b Posts: 126 Member
I understand that weight loss occurs when you create a calorie deficit.

What I am confused on are the macros of daily nutrition. Is it really as simple as a calorie is a calorie, weather it is from carb, protein, sugar or fat?

If I go over MFP recommendation for daily fat intake but am under my overall daily calorie goal, is a calorie still a calorie still a calorie???

Can you eat more carbs and fat than is recommended daily, but be under calories and still lose weight at the same rate? Why is it important to balance these calories out...or is it?

I think this is a simple concept but I'm trying to wrap my brain around it and it's giving me a massive mind f # % k today! :s

Replies

  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    I just underwent extreme weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery. My first task after surgery was to achieve a 1,200 calorie a day diet, with minimum grams of protein. Without enough protein, bad things happen like muscle loss and hair loss. I think all three macros are important for their own reasons.

    I think you can mess with the ratios and you will be fine, but don't try and cut one.

    The fat provides long lasting energy, fatty vitamins and probably helps with cognitive function (you avoid becoming a stupid dieter).

    The protein, building blocks for life.

    The carbohydrates, energy to move.

    Add them all up and if you keep to your target calories for the day, you'll lose weight.
  • fairy2b
    fairy2b Posts: 126 Member
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    Right, I'm not talking about taking anything away. I'm just wondering if you can go over your fat allowance but be UNDER calories and how that affects (if it does) weight loss.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    You can go over your fat allowance but be under calories and still lose weight.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    Measure carefully. Fats are slippery stuff.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,868 Member
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    A calorie is just a unit of energy. Your macros are what is going to make up your nutritional profile. There is not magical macro ratio...my settings aren't remotely close to the MFP default which I found to be far too low on protein. Also, people follow a variety of different diets and eating plans...low carb/high fat for example will have you eating far fewer carbs than MFP's default and way more dietary fat.

    Macro ratios are a very personal thing and tend to have a more significant impact on performance than weight loss. They are a good thing to be aware of, especially if you're trying to balance out your diet...but where weight loss is concerned, calories are overwhelmingly what matters most...with stress regulation and rest being close seconds.
  • nancyjay__
    nancyjay__ Posts: 310 Member
    edited April 2015
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    You can go over your fat allowance but be under calories and still lose weight.
    Nvm agreed
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,868 Member
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    nancyjay__ wrote: »
    jgnatca wrote: »
    You can go over your fat allowance but be under calories and still lose weight.

    Why not?

    she say "you can"..
  • nancyjay__
    nancyjay__ Posts: 310 Member
    edited April 2015
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    Macronutrients constitute the bulk of the diet and supply energy and many essential nutrients. Carbohydrates, proteins (including essential amino acids), fats (including essential fatty acids), macrominerals, and water are macronutrients. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are interchangeable as sources of energy; fats yield 9 kcal/g (37.8 kJ/g); proteins and carbohydrates yield 4 kcal/g (16.8 kJ/g).

    http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional-disorders/nutrition-general-considerations/overview-of-nutrition?qt=&sc=&alt=
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    @nancyjay__ you'll have to help me out here because your question is a double negative.

    Are you asking, "Why will you lose weight if you go under calories?" which is what you wrote, or do you mean, "Why not lose weight if you are under calories but over fat for the day?" I agree with the latter.
  • nancyjay__
    nancyjay__ Posts: 310 Member
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    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    nancyjay__ wrote: »
    jgnatca wrote: »
    You can go over your fat allowance but be under calories and still lose weight.

    Why not?

    she say "you can"..

    That's why I edited and said nvm :| I thought I saw a no but didn't
  • nancyjay__
    nancyjay__ Posts: 310 Member
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    jgnatca wrote: »
    @nancyjay__ you'll have to help me out here because your question is a double negative.

    Are you asking, "Why will you lose weight if you go under calories?" which is what you wrote, or do you mean, "Why not lose weight if you are under calories but over fat for the day?" I agree with the latter.

    I said nvm I agreeeeeee geez lol
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,868 Member
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    nancyjay__ wrote: »
    jgnatca wrote: »
    @nancyjay__ you'll have to help me out here because your question is a double negative.

    Are you asking, "Why will you lose weight if you go under calories?" which is what you wrote, or do you mean, "Why not lose weight if you are under calories but over fat for the day?" I agree with the latter.

    I said nvm I agreeeeeee geez lol

    LOL...I think you were editing while we were responding.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    Yup! I'll take your edit with a dose of sweetness and light.
  • snowflake954
    snowflake954 Posts: 8,399 Member
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    I'm no expert, but can only tell you my experience. I started on here 2 yrs ago, and have lost 20lbs, with about 10 to go. I'm older--60yrs. Losing weight slowly, watching my macros, and excercising regularly all contributed to a nice loss, with a real difference in body comp. The whole package gives you the correct energy to excercise without feeling weak. Watching calories is first and foremost, but watching your macros is the frosting on the cake. Best. B)