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Fiber as a carb in relation to water retention

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TheStephil
TheStephil Posts: 858 Member
Hello!

From my limited research on the matter, carbs retain water. Cutting carbs lowers water retention. Hence why people that switch to Adkins or South beach Diet tend to see a large decrease in weight the first few weeks.

In order to look in prime condition for an upcoming convention, I am trying my luck at reducing carbs in order to lose some water weight and bloat I've been experiencing. I'm also increasing water and lowering sodium.

I usually average about 175g/carbs a day. I have three weeks before the convention so I planned to move carbs to 120g/day for the next two weeks then drop it down to 100g/day the last week. I know for optimal water weight loss going as low as 30g is ideal but I'd be miserable. I've already noticed a different lowering my carbs down from 175g to an average of 125g the last week or so.

My question: Does fiber count towards carb count in the terms of water retention? Fiber is mentioned as a way to lose bloat, water weight, etc. Fiber is pushed through the body and not absorbed the same way as other carbs (limited research) and is not counted towards "active carb" counts.

I eat at least one Quest bar daily so the difference would be 20g vs 3-4g depending on if fiber should be counted.

Replies

  • yarwell
    yarwell Posts: 10,477 Member
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    Atkins (with a "T") results in water loss due to lower insulin levels and carbohydrate intake leading to more loss of sodium and hence water in urine. Fibre wouldn't do that. Fibre does add bulk to stools and feed gut bacteria so may increase the weight of bowel contents.

    At the levels of carbohydrate you're discussing I wouldn't be confident of seeing this effect.