Myfitnesspal

Message Boards General Health, Fitness and Diet
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Pork tenderloin, a good alternative to chicken?

1246710

Replies

  • NobodyPutsAmyInTheCornerNobodyPutsAmyInTheCorner Member Posts: 1,018 Member Member Posts: 1,018 Member
    Do not undercook pork and poultry! Bacteria loves pork and poultry, but will be killed when the meat is no longer pink.
    Pink pork isn't undercooked, though.

    If the juice doesn't run clear... It's undercooked. If the juice is clear... Off you go lol
  • WinoGelatoWinoGelato Member Posts: 13,458 Member Member Posts: 13,458 Member
    Pork tenderloin is one of the leanest cuts of meat, absorbs marinades really well, tastes delicious, and (IMO) is a little more upscale than chicken.

    The rule used to be that it needed to be cooked well done but a few years ago the recommendations were revised and I believe anything above an internal temp of 135 is safe to eat.

    We grill it often and it is very important to let the tenderloin rest before slicing it so that it stays juicy.

    Sesame ginger pork tenderloin with Thai noodles and edamame is on my menu plan for this week!
  • RodaRoseRodaRose Member Posts: 9,574 Member Member Posts: 9,574 Member
    If you want you can buy a meat thermometer for five dollars at any grocery store.
    ========
    6t80x46jwiho.png

  • cw106cw106 Member Posts: 940 Member Member Posts: 940 Member
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    So I live in Canada and chicken is very expensive while pork is significantly less expensive. I'm just wondering if it's safe to eat pork everyday?

    I hear you should only eat red meat twice a week, but in the context of a mostly plant-based diet is it safe?

    great question,with a suprising outcome...

    i also considered it a white,lean meat, but the NHS (uk) clearly states it is considered a red meat and cautions intake to a max 70g daily or 500g weekly Including processed meat too,in that amount.
    clear studies linking red/processed meat over consumption to greater risk of bowel cancer in over 60s.

    have already swapped out processed meat for fish/ cheese, looks like pork is a max twice a week meal.
    aldi + lidl here in uk have regular half price weekend sales where i stock up on months supplies of chicken/ turkey breast.cost abouts £1.30 for 375g.(less than $2).
  • kommodevarankommodevaran Member Posts: 17,891 Member Member Posts: 17,891 Member
    In the US, pork is considered white meat since 1977:



    This was supposed to start playing at around 17 minutes in, but - it's worth watching in its entirety.
    edited June 2015
  • atypicalsmithatypicalsmith Member Posts: 2,742 Member Member Posts: 2,742 Member
    Orphia wrote: »
    Australia's health department recommends a maximum of 455 grams of lean red meat per week for adults.

    http://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/the_guidelines/n55g_adult_brochure.pdf

    yikes! I have steak a couple times a week, and they're definitely not lean or lightweight..
    rabbitjb wrote: »
    But pork isn't red meat

    It's white

    On this I am pretty sure ...cos colours

    plus, the slogan is:

    "Pork, the other white meat"

    Am most cofussdeded right now!

    It's red. Duck and chicken and fish and other seafood are white.
  • angelexperimentangelexperiment Member Posts: 1,904 Member Member Posts: 1,904 Member
    It is bc red meat tis harder to digest and sits longer in the bowel. White meat is easier to digest and has a quicker exit time. And something to do with protein ash. Especially if you have digestive issues or gastric diseases you are advised to avoid red meat.
  • TheDevastatorTheDevastator Member Posts: 1,629 Member Member Posts: 1,629 Member
    Pork is higher in a few vitamins than beef and poultry.
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,373 Member Member Posts: 24,373 Member
    In the US, pork is considered white meat since 1977:



    This was supposed to start playing at around 17 minutes in, but - it's worth watching in its entirety.

    Not really. It was promoted as "new white meat" (by the pork industry) but isn't classified as that by the FDA - the whole white/red debate is ridiculous. Does it suddenly become more or less evil depending on the meat color? How silly. It's just maketing. Pork is relatively lean and tasty. No reason not to eat it.

    Thanks for posting the video, he's an enjoyable speaker. Unfortunately - while I agree with a lot of his starting point analysis I find it's unfortunate that his "rules" just reinforce the nutritionism he rails against. The "anti-processed" bandwagon that he speaks and writes for tends to come across as reactionary.

    Minor arguments - perhaps he is a necessary voice to his American audience and making food manufacturing and processing the debil is *an* answer to eating 'better' as it influences attidudes to eating.

    It's also interesting that he doesn't have a monolithic response to the QA session - I prefer that to his "rules" proposed in his books which frankly often have me shaking my head. His journalism is clearly colored by his personal agenda, if you agree with him - great - but I'm a bit more critical.
    edited June 2015
  • KANGOOJUMPSKANGOOJUMPS Member Posts: 6,488 Member Member Posts: 6,488 Member
    I am in Canada,, we marinate in hoisin sauce and put it on the BBQ,,, everyone asks for the recipe/ so so yummy.mix with hoisin with a bit of soya sauce.
  • brendak76brendak76 Member Posts: 241 Member Member Posts: 241 Member
    I bought 4 whole boneless pork loins on sale at Jewel Osco this week for $1.29/pound. My receipt said I saved $170. We will be having lots of pork at our house!!
  • pennydreadful270pennydreadful270 Member Posts: 266 Member Member Posts: 266 Member

    Not really. It was promoted as "new white meat" (by the pork industry) but isn't classified as that by the FDA - the whole white/red debate is ridiculous. Does it suddenly become more or less evil depending on the meat color? How silly. It's just maketing. Pork is relatively lean and tasty. No reason not to eat it.

    Good study http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/63

    Supposedly it's the Iron content that makes it red- and also- causes bowel cancer. I think you can do something to mitigate the risks by eating a diet that otherwise is plant-rich, including cruciferous vegetables and has a fast transit through your system.

    The study shows that those who eat a small amount of red meat have a better outcome than those who eat none. Probably because of the iron and vitamins in red meat.

    Processed in unequivocally bad though. Statistically you lose an hour of your life over every bacon sandwich. :'(
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,373 Member Member Posts: 24,373 Member

    Not really. It was promoted as "new white meat" (by the pork industry) but isn't classified as that by the FDA - the whole white/red debate is ridiculous. Does it suddenly become more or less evil depending on the meat color? How silly. It's just maketing. Pork is relatively lean and tasty. No reason not to eat it.

    Good study http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/63

    Supposedly it's the Iron content that makes it red- and also- causes bowel cancer. I think you can do something to mitigate the risks by eating a diet that otherwise is plant-rich, including cruciferous vegetables and has a fast transit through your system.

    The study shows that those who eat a small amount of red meat have a better outcome than those who eat none. Probably because of the iron and vitamins in red meat.

    Processed in unequivocally bad though. Statistically you lose an hour of your life over every bacon sandwich. :'(

    You think so?
    After correction for measurement error, higher all-cause mortality remained significant only for processed meat (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.25, per 50 g/d).

    Unequivocally?

    It's an 18% relative risk ratio increase -that's small- I'm pretty certain that is significantly three orders of magnitude lower than being obese. These questionnaire-based studies need to be taken with a large grain of salt - I'd even guess that meat consumption rates a large marker for over-consuming calories.

    The studies on processed meat do suggest issues but the upper quintiles are significantly higher than average consumption.

    ETA Also :
    The EPIC results do not show the lowest relative risks (RRs) for subjects in the lowest meat intake category, but a slight J-shaped association with the lowest risk among subjects with low-to-moderate meat consumption. This was observed for red meat and poultry. Also, taking into account the results from the studies that evaluated vegetarian and low-meat diets, it appears that a low - but not a zero - consumption of meat might be beneficial for health. This is understandable as meat is an important source of nutrients, such as protein, iron, zinc, several B-vitamins as well as vitamin A and essential fatty acids (linoleic acid and to a minor extent eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids also...

    I dint read anything in that study suggesting it was iron. They, and the U.S. Studies focus more on saturated fats and nitrates.
    edited June 2015
  • pennydreadful270pennydreadful270 Member Posts: 266 Member Member Posts: 266 Member
    I agree, I think there are people who could easily have bacon for breakfast, ham for lunch, and hot dogs for tea. Latest advice says they are the ones who need to cut down to the average.
    edited June 2015
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Member Posts: 24,373 Member Member Posts: 24,373 Member
    I agree, I think there are people who could easily have bacon for breakfast, ham for lunch, and hot dogs for tea. Latest advice says they are the ones who need to cut down to the average.

    Most likely. I've yet to see a diary like that here, though.
  • unrelentingminxunrelentingminx Member Posts: 233 Member Member Posts: 233 Member
    I love pork tenderloin. I dislike cuts that have large chunks of visible, gelatinous fat on them so tenderloin is perfect for me as it is no lean. Once it's stuffed or marinated it's lovely, and in the UK it is so much cheaper than chicken.
  • temazurtemazur Member Posts: 76 Member Member Posts: 76 Member
    Pork is white meat to me. Pork like chicken has a massive risk of food poisoning if not cooked properly. Unlike beef and lamb which you can pretty much eat still mooing if you so chose.

    Absolutely not true.

    Poultry is a high-risk for salmonella, all other meats carry a risk, but lower than poultry.

    The biggest boogie man for pork was trichinosis, which dies in 6 minutes when exposed to 131 degrees Fahrenheit, so hitting 145 will eliminate all issues, but still leave it delicious, juicy and probably a touch pink. And, it isn't nearly as big a deal as it used to be 50+ years ago. Chances of running into trichinosis are about 1 in 154 million in a commercial store in the US.

    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/trichinae/docs/fact_sheet.htm <-- good source of info.
    http://www.porkcares.org/our-practices/food-safety/the-truth-about-trichinosis-in-pork

    Now, if you're cooking wild game, all this goes out the window. Wild game has a higher chance of infection, so I'd definitely make sure I hit the 145, or higher, mark with it just to make sure.

    Oh, and you can eat beef "still mooing", but you will have a risk of e. coli, depending on how the meat was handled. Meat packed in a plant, even a larger cut, has a chance of it, so cook the surface well. Meat slaughtered and processed in a smaller setting should have a decreased chance (less poo flying around than in a large scale, modern slaughtering facility), but you still eat rare beef at your own risk.*

    When it comes to meat risk and sickness, I, personally, consider pork no riskier than beef, then chicken, then many seafoods. (this is my personal scale of "I'm about to fly/go to an interview/be on a long car ride, so how much risk do I want to take on this suspect hotel food?").

    *for the record, I freaking love rare and medium rare steak and eat it that way whenever I can. As much as I like a nice, medium or medium well burger, I don't take the chance unless I'm in an establishment where I know they grind their own meat on premises.
  • SLLRunnerSLLRunner Member Posts: 12,943 Member Member Posts: 12,943 Member
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    So I live in Canada and chicken is very expensive while pork is significantly less expensive. I'm just wondering if it's safe to eat pork everyday?

    I hear you should only eat red meat twice a week, but in the context of a mostly plant-based diet is it safe?

    You can eat whatever you want each day. I eat meat every single day for the protein.
  • juggernaut1974juggernaut1974 Member Posts: 6,212 Member Member Posts: 6,212 Member
    As a native Iowan (highest pork producing state in the US) it is my duty to say "EAT MOR PORK"
  • bbonthebbbontheb Member Posts: 718 Member Member Posts: 718 Member
    Kruggeri wrote: »
    Pork tenderloin is one of the leanest cuts of meat, absorbs marinades really well, tastes delicious, and (IMO) is a little more upscale than chicken.

    The rule used to be that it needed to be cooked well done but a few years ago the recommendations were revised and I believe anything above an internal temp of 135 is safe to eat.

    We grill it often and it is very important to let the tenderloin rest before slicing it so that it stays juicy.

    Sesame ginger pork tenderloin with Thai noodles and edamame is on my menu plan for this week!

    May I have your recipe? Sounds so good.
Sign In or Register to comment.