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Weight lifting for weight loss

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Hi, all. I am looking for some advice. I have 65-70 pounds to lose and I have recently started weight lifting using Stronglifts 5x5, which is basically 5 sets of 5 reps of bench, deadlifts, overhead press, squats, barbell row, etc. using progressively heavy weights. I was recently told by someone in the fitness industry that I should keep my weights lighter (not light) and do more reps. Maybe something like a 3x12 regimen, in order to lose weight. I am also eating at a deficit 1200-1500 calories daily (5'2/ female), with 100g protein and 75-100g carbs, fat varies, but I probably usually end of between 40-50g. I also try to get some pretty good HIIT workouts in 3 times per week, plus walking and some occasional dancing (Zumba or Dailyburn Move). I am really struggling to get this weight off and I don't want to do anything counterproductive. Weight loss is my most imoortant goal, but I want strength and good muscle tone, too.

Replies

  • IsaackGMOON
    IsaackGMOON Posts: 3,358 Member
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    The person in the fitness industry has told you misinformed information, disregard what he/she said.

    A 3x12 regimen is a hypertrophy based rep range, I don't think this is needed at all during weight loss.

    OP, what are your stats? I see that you're eating at a 1200-1500 calorie deficit which is quite high, are you sure you're not eating 1200-1500 calories instead?

    It doesn't matter what exercise you do, because weight loss comes from a caloric deficit. The gym is only there for improving physical fitness.
  • Mr_Stabbems
    Mr_Stabbems Posts: 4,771 Member
    edited July 2015
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    HIIT 3 times a week? HIIT is hard work, are you sure you're pushing yourself enough?

    Keep the deficit, workout and/or do cardio but most importantly be consistent with your diet.

    If you hit a plateau then switch it up a bit, i switched from my basic routine to a variation of GVT. Worked a treat
  • lynpcooper
    lynpcooper Posts: 44 Member
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    The person in the fitness industry has told you misinformed information, disregard what he/she said.

    A 3x12 regimen is a hypertrophy based rep range, I don't think this is needed at all during weight loss.

    OP, what are your stats? I see that you're eating at a 1200-1500 calorie deficit which is quite high, are you sure you're not eating 1200-1500 calories instead?

    It doesn't matter what exercise you do, because weight loss comes from a caloric deficit. The gym is only there for improving physical fitness.

    I am eating 1200-1500 calories daily, not a 1200-1500 calorie daily. I apologize for the confusion. Thank you for the advice. And if higher reps are for hypertrophy, what are the low and moderate range for?
  • Faithful_Chosen
    Faithful_Chosen Posts: 401 Member
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    A few basics:

    - weight loss happens in the kitchen: calories in vs. calories out. If you eat less than your body burns, you loose weight (if you don't have a medical condition that prevents it)
    - weight lifting encourages your body not to 'eat' muscle to make up for the food deficit you are creating, so you maintain (and maybe even grow a bit in the beginning) muscle mass
    - cardio, in general, burns more calories than weight lifting
    - weight lifting is primarily used to grow muscles
    - to grow muscles, you need to eat a surplus
    - ...so weight loss and strength training don't tend to go together.

    That said, you said the primary goal is to loose weight through strength training, not gain muscle mass. As such, if you eat a deficit, yes, you will be helped by strength training because it will give you a bit more of a calorie burn, thus increase your deficit (do try to eat back some of your exercise calories!). You are not going to build a lot of muscle mass, though, because you're not fueling your body enough. There is a technique called 'body recompositioning' you might want to look into (blog.myfitnesspal.com/the-basics-of-body-recomposition-how-to-lose-fat-gain-muscle-at-the-same-time/) as well.

    Good luck!
  • lynpcooper
    lynpcooper Posts: 44 Member
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    HIIT 3 times a week? HIIT is hard work, are you sure you're pushing yourself enough?

    Keep the deficit, workout and/or do cardio but most importantly be consistent with your diet.

    If you hit a plateau then switch it up a bit, i switched from my basic routine to a variation of GVT. Worked a treat

    What is GVT?
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,248 Member
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    It's a caloric deficit that will result in weight loss whether or not you do any type of exercise, measure, weigh & log every crumb that crosses your lips......

    Having said that your person in the fitness industry was mistaken. Typically someone like me will lift lighter weights more reps as I'm a runner and my goal are not hypertrophy but a combination of strength / injury resistance (and I'm not lifting to failure). Recent research has also suggested that weight lifters can achieve similar results with either high weight / low rep or lower weight / high reps if both are lifting to failure.

    If wight loss is your main goal you may want to add more cardio (don't forgo the strength) for the simple reason that it typically burns more calories. (but, again....it's 80% what you eat....)
  • IsaackGMOON
    IsaackGMOON Posts: 3,358 Member
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    lynpcooper wrote: »
    The person in the fitness industry has told you misinformed information, disregard what he/she said.

    A 3x12 regimen is a hypertrophy based rep range, I don't think this is needed at all during weight loss.

    OP, what are your stats? I see that you're eating at a 1200-1500 calorie deficit which is quite high, are you sure you're not eating 1200-1500 calories instead?

    It doesn't matter what exercise you do, because weight loss comes from a caloric deficit. The gym is only there for improving physical fitness.

    I am eating 1200-1500 calories daily, not a 1200-1500 calorie daily. I apologize for the confusion. Thank you for the advice. And if higher reps are for hypertrophy, what are the low and moderate range for?

    Generally, 5x5 is a strength range. Hypertrophy reps range from 8-12.
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,261 Member
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    Either range is fine. There is certainly overlap between them. If you go the 8-12 rep route you will get stronger, assuming progressive overload. And with 5 reps, muscle building can/will happen with the right nutrition. It's just that different ranges are seen as most efficient for different goals.

    That being said, if you like SL 5x5, stick with it and don't change the rep scheme. In other words, just do the program as written. If, on the other hand, you'd like to try the other rep scheme, AlPro's simple beginner routine is one option.
  • 47Jacqueline
    47Jacqueline Posts: 6,993 Member
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    Weight lifting is great, as is cardio, but what will have you lose weight is eating at a deficit.